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Charles

Winchester, KY, United States
  • 11
  • reviews
  • 53
  • helpful votes
  • 11
  • ratings
  • Moby Dick

  • By: Herman Melville
  • Narrated by: Anthony Heald
  • Length: 23 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,260
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 851
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 844

The outcast youth Ishmael, succumbing to wanderlust during a dreary New England autumn, signs up for passage aboard a whaling ship. The Pequod sails under the command of the one-legged Captain Ahab, who has set himself on a monomaniacal quest to capture the cunning white whale that robbed him of his leg: Moby-Dick. Capturing life on the sea with robust realism, Melville details the adventures of the colorful crew aboard the ship as Ahab pursues his crusade of revenge, heedless of all cost.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Gripping despite the minutiae

  • By Sarah on 06-06-08

Understandably a classic

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-04-18

Great story and Melville's use of the language to relay the sequence of events as well as reveal the characters is skillfully executed. The reader is a bit dramatic, but that aligns with the demands of the story. Fabulous audio book.

  • The Vanishing American Adult

  • Our Coming-of-Age Crisis - and How to Rebuild a Culture of Self-Reliance
  • By: Ben Sasse
  • Narrated by: Ben Sasse
  • Length: 11 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,390
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,233
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,226

In The Vanishing American Adult, Nebraska Senator Ben Sasse diagnoses the causes of a generation that can't grow up and offers a path for raising children to become active and engaged citizens. He identifies core formative experiences that all young people should pursue - hard work to appreciate the benefits of labor, travel to understand deprivation and want, the power of reading, the importance of nurturing your body - and explains how parents can encourage them.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A truly non-partisan essay on being an American

  • By Anne on 07-06-17

Spot on

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-12-17

As an educator in a professional degree program for several years, my observation is the entitlement mentality in our young people is continually worsening. Fewer students enter higher education having worked part-time or during summers. Many are, indeed, not remotely acquainted with being held accountable and actually producing. Young people need those work experiences and value lessons.
....

......... Sasse makes many good points throughout.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Whiskey Bottles and Brand-New Cars

  • The Fast Life and Sudden Death of Lynyrd Skynyrd
  • By: Mark Ribowsky
  • Narrated by: Jeremy Arthur
  • Length: 10 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 245
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 226
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 223

This intimate story of Lynyrd Skynyrd tells how a band of lost souls and self-destructive misfits, with uncertain artistic objectives, clawed their way to the top of the rock 'n' roll world. It also offers a greater appreciation for a band whose legacy, in the aftermath of their last plane ride, has since descended into self-caricature.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • What could have been...

  • By Charles on 07-12-15

What could have been...

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-12-15

I was a Skynyrd fan primarily during my high school and college years; the accident happened my senior year of high school. There was much I did not know about the group’s formation, development, and the sequelae since the plane crash. I thought this book could fill in many blanks and my curiosity led me to the purchase. Parts were enjoyable and parts were objectionable. The accuracy initially seemed to be there, but that may be in question. An attribute of hard copy books as opposed to audiobooks is being able to evaluate the author’s research and references. On this note, please look at those reviews on Amazon, which are written by those apparently having done this assessment in detail and boldly questioning many of the author’s claims. Additionally, I grew very tired of the author’s incessant need to inform the audience of his political beliefs. He never misses an opportunity to push his opinion on the reader/listener, even if it unrelated or only remotely related to topic of the book. Indeed, the author displays his arrogance by failing to subjugate his own views and sacrifices telling the intended story by this political ranting. How does his opinion of Ted Cruz even belong in a historical perspective of Lynyrd Skynyrd? Further, he cannot seem to differentiate between fiscal conservatism and racism, actually revealing his own lack of understanding of the issues about which he repeatedly drones. This could have been a good book, but the author apparently chose to take shortcuts and also use it as a political epistle instead.

30 of 31 people found this review helpful

  • How We Learn

  • The Surprising Truth About When, Where, and Why It Happens
  • By: Benedict Carey
  • Narrated by: Steve Kramer
  • Length: 7 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 579
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 489
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 484

From an early age, it is drilled into our heads: Restlessness, distraction, and ignorance are the enemies of success. We’re told that learning is all self-discipline, that we must confine ourselves to designated study areas, turn off the music, and maintain a strict ritual if we want to ace that test, memorize that presentation, or nail that piano recital. But what if almost everything we were told about learning is wrong?

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Mostly how we "remember", not how we "learn"

  • By NH Mama on 05-05-16

Interesting & Evidence Supported Perspectives

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-26-14

Benedict Carey offers some interesting insights of the learning process in some non-traditional but evidence supported methods. Even though I have studied learning and educational psychology some, I was not familiar with some of the research Carey offered. Some of the insights helped me to understand a few of the observations I had made in my professional degree program students over the years. Indeed, some of this content will be woven into recommendations for future courses. I rated everything as a 4-star for this book because of tending to be stingy with 5s. If available, 4.5s would have been perfect. If you are an educator at the secondary level or higher, I recommend this book. It could change the way you do things or the evidence presented therein could prove to be the impetus behind your own creative strategies for your students or even adult learners.

8 of 8 people found this review helpful

  • Outliers

  • The Story of Success
  • By: Malcolm Gladwell
  • Narrated by: Malcolm Gladwell
  • Length: 7 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 29,643
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 21,754
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 21,732

In this stunning new book, Malcolm Gladwell takes us on an intellectual journey through the world of "outliers" - the best and the brightest, the most famous and the most successful. He asks the question: what makes high achievers different? His answer is that we pay too much attention to what successful people are like and too little attention to where they are from: that is, their culture, their family, their generation, and the idiosyncratic experiences of their upbringing.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Captivating (if not an outlier)

  • By KHarrang on 11-21-08

Disappointed

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-07-14

Throughout the book, the author uses narratives of several famous Individuals to generalize to the population. In effect, he attempts to validate his perspective with scattered anecdotal evidence. I found this somewhat misrepresentative during the progression of the book and then it all made sense listening to the interview at the end. The author purposefully planned the book as an "assault on rugged individualism"--his description. He appears to do this to advance some sociopolitical perspective (again, listen to the interview). Sure, circumstances and opportunity play a role in all our lives, not only the rich or famous. The hockey team story is way overblown. Could 6 more months of physical and emotional maturity make a difference in adolescent athletes? Sure, but are not most sophomore athletes better than their freshman year? Yes, it is simply development, practice, and competitive play. That some are denied opportunity because of these factors and it is unfair is nonsense. The author also seems to discount all the other intra-individual characteristics that could be significant factors in the courses of these lives and the outcomes of the stories. If you have ever made something out of nothing by virtue of your determination, had insights and developed some innovative project, or creatively solved a dilemma, you may not like this book. According to the author's perspective, you just got lucky and then anyone could have done the rest. He magnifies one factor in the equation disproportionally and minimizes the other contributors. I enjoyed Blink, but he's off target here. These are interesting stories, which is why I suspect so many people rate the book so highly. Anecdotes do not equal evidence.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Endurance

  • Shackleton's Incredible Voyage
  • By: Alfred Lansing
  • Narrated by: Simon Prebble
  • Length: 10 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13,629
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,020
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,010

In August of 1914, the British ship Endurance set sail for the South Atlantic. In October, 1915, still half a continent away from its intended base, the ship was trapped, then crushed in the ice. For five months, Sir Ernest Shackleton and his men, drifting on ice packs, were castaways in one of the most savage regions of the world.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Superb in so many ways

  • By David on 01-19-14

Truly amazing story

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-21-13

As this began, I was not as enthralled as other reviewers. As the story continues and the voyagers managed one hardship after another, one might begin to ask, "could I have endured that?" Time after time they did and against tremendous odds. What astounding constitutional strength by so many! In the end, they accomplished so much more than they intended, albeit at quite a cost. By the end, it truly was gripping.
I did not realize until the notes at the end, the book was published that long ago. As others have commented, the reader does a great job. His pacing, tenor, emphasis, etc. are near perfect. He does a wonderful job projecting the emotions of the men and portraying the various characters in their voices.
After completing it today, I have already begun to listen to it again to absorb it all more fully again. Stories like this are exactly why non-fiction is so much more interesting.

  • Better

  • A Surgeon's Notes on Performance
  • By: Atul Gawande
  • Narrated by: John Bedford Lloyd
  • Length: 7 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,397
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,005
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,000

Atul Gawande explores how doctors strive for best performance in the face of seemingly insurmountable obstacles. His stories of diligence and ingenuity take us to battlefield surgical tents in Iraq, to labor and delivery rooms in Boston, to a polio outbreak in India, and to malpractice courtrooms around the country. He discusses the ethical dilemmas of doctors' participation in lethal injections, examines the influence of money on medicine, and recounts the astoundingly contentious history of hand washing.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Fascinating and Well Read

  • By L. M. Roberts on 05-23-10

From an outlying negative view...

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-07-13

I am baffled how people are rating this so high. It is a rambling, discontinuous stream of conscious kind of work. I have purchased approximately 40 books on Audible and this is the first one that simply did not warrant finishing. At 2/3rds of the way, I surrendered---no more. I, too, am in a medical field and so was particularly attracted to this about getting better in practice and teaching. Nothing in this collection of anecdotes provides a basis for self-study insights toward improvement. The narrator is fine. In fact, he has my admiration for doing his job on this one.

10 of 12 people found this review helpful

  • No Easy Day

  • The Firsthand Account of the Mission That Killed Osama Bin Laden
  • By: Mark Owen, Kevin Maurer
  • Narrated by: Holter Graham
  • Length: 6 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,250
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,474
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,504

From the streets of Iraq to the mountaintops of Afghanistan and to the third floor of Osama Bin Laden's compound, operator Mark Owen of the U.S. Naval Special Warfare Development Group - commonly known as SEAL Team Six - has been a part of some of the most memorable special operations in history, as well as countless missions that never made headlines. No Easy Day puts listeners alongside Owen and the other handpicked members of the 24-man team as they train for the biggest mission of their lives.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Gripping, first-hand narrative of Op Neptune Spear

  • By Darwin8u on 09-04-12

Importance of a first account of history

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-14-12

First, all the bluster about revealing operational secrets, etc.---it is not there. Nothing I heard in this narrative was particularly a surprise. If any adversary could gain some type of tactical advantage from this, they obviously have not done their homework elsewhere. I suspect some of that bluster is because the author is not particularly complimentary of Obama and his willingness to take credit for the operation. The author does not drone on about this, but simply makes an observation and moves on with the rest of the story.
To learn the inside story of what actually happened with the mission is very interesting, particularly how close it came to going horribly wrong. This book is mostly about the men who train relentlessly becoming professional operators and the work that goes on to allow them to succeed. If you have an interest in current events and like to know the intricacies of how this event actually occurred, this is recommended.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • When I Left Home

  • My Story
  • By: Buddy Guy, David Ritz
  • Narrated by: Mirron Willis
  • Length: 7 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 156
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 142
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 139

According to Eric Clapton, John Mayer, and the late Stevie Ray Vaughn, Buddy Guy is the greatest blues guitarist of all time. An enormous influence on these musicians as well as on Jimi Hendrix, Jimmy Page, and Jeff Beck, he is the living embodiment of Chicago blues.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent History and Respect for The Blues

  • By Rick R. on 08-05-12

A must for blues fans

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-31-12

This one is, indeed, a must for blues fans. Buddy Guy's story is compelling--from working in cotton as a child to being a world-wide acclaimed guitarist. The history he tells of other blues musicians over the decades, however, is priceless. After listening to this, you will probably be a greater fan of Buddy's and you will have loved all the stories he told along the way.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • My Cross to Bear

  • By: Gregg Allman, Alan Light
  • Narrated by: Will Patton
  • Length: 10 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 684
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 627
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 623

As one of the greatest rock icons of all time, Gregg Allman has lived it all and then some. For almost 50 years, he's been creating some of the most recognizable songs in American rock, but never before has he paused to reflect on the long road he's traveled. Now, he tells the unflinching story of his life, laying bare the unvarnished truth about his wild ride that has spanned across the years.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • my cross to bear was awesome

  • By the dude on 05-02-12

Lots of history---fascinating trip

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-21-12

If you are a fan of the ABB, you will love the story of how the band was formed. The group's struggles are well documented, but you will likely learn a few things along the way. Any discussion of the ABB invariably includes "what ifs" and we are again left to wonder what music could have been created had Duane lived longer. Gregg's personal account appears to hold nothing back. I confess to being a fan and have worn out multiple vinyl copies of Fillmore East before finally switching to CDs. It is still one of the finest sets every produced. The story behind the cover photos was interesting--and probably not what you might have imagined. This is but one of many nuggets along the way. Will Patton's reading is spot on. He seems to capture Allman's soulful expression from the text to match what Allman delivers in performance. Patton's delivery adds tremendously to the story, giving it great realism. I would have given this an overall of 4.5 had that option been available.