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Diane Walter

  • 14
  • reviews
  • 26
  • helpful votes
  • 101
  • ratings
  • George Washington's Secret Six

  • The Spy Ring That Saved America
  • By: Brian Kilmeade, Don Yaeger
  • Narrated by: Brian Kilmeade
  • Length: 5 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,667
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,504
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,511

From the cohost of Fox & Friends, the true story of the anonymous spies who helped win the Revolutionary War. Among the pantheon of heroes of the American Revolution, six names are missing. First and foremost, Robert Townsend, an unassuming and respected businessman from Long Island, who spearheaded the spy ring that covertly brought down the British

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Good story, boring reader

  • By Mark on 06-04-15

Horrible narrator

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-03-18

I found the history fascinating but the story could not overcome the awful narration,. The narrator sounded like he was shouting- spitting words out with so much force that he had to stop to take a breath mid-sentence, causing odd breaks in the cadence of sentences. I had to keep backing up just to parse what he was trying to say. Get a native English speaker next time. This guy apparently learned to speak in a locker room.

  • The Lost Starship

  • By: Vaughn Heppner
  • Narrated by: David Stifel
  • Length: 13 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 3,577
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 3,300
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 3,301

Ten thousand years ago, a single alien super-ship survived a desperate battle. The vessel's dying crew set the AI on automatic to defend the smashed rubble of their planet. Legend has it the faithful ship continues to patrol the empty battlefield, obeying its last order throughout the lonely centuries.In the here and now, Earth needs a miracle. Out of the Beyond invade the New Men, stronger, faster and smarter than the old. Their superior warships and advanced technology destroy every fleet sent to stop them.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Old school-style scifi with dreary narration

  • By dtamayob on 03-18-16

Trite, silly

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-15-18

I couldn’t bear to finish this ridiculous story. It was so predictable and unimaginative. I can’t imagine how the reader could keep a straight face while performing the silly thing. Save your money.

  • The Infinity Puzzle

  • Quantum Field Theory and the Hunt for an Orderly Universe
  • By: Frank Close
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Cowley
  • Length: 12 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 107
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 88
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 81

The second half of the 20th century witnessed a scientific gold rush as physicists raced to chart the inner workings of the atom. The stakes were high, the questions were big, and there were Nobel Prizes and everlasting glory to be won. Many mysteries of the atom came unraveled, but one remained intractable-what Frank Close calls the "Infinity Puzzle."

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • As another reviewer notes...

  • By Douglas on 03-31-13

Terrific overview of QED, QCD, and QFD

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-02-17

Oxford physicist Frank Close carefully traces the advance of our understanding of matter and the forces they feel, from the ideas of Newton to the development of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. He describes in clear language the problems arising in the accepted physical models and how they were solved. He deftly explains complex ideas using easy to understand analogies. I've listened to several books that delve into these topics, and I think Close has done the best job of clarifying, at least for me, the bewildering concepts behind symmetry breaking, and gauge invariance. I thought this book was fascinating and I recommend it very highly to young physicists or oldsters like me who are interested in finding out more about the cosmos.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Dawn

  • Xenogenesis, Book 1
  • By: Octavia E. Butler
  • Narrated by: Aldrich Barrett
  • Length: 9 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 3,024
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,750
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,750

In a world devastated by nuclear war with humanity on the edge of extinction, aliens finally make contact. They rescue those humans they can, keeping most survivors in suspended animation while the aliens begin the slow process of rehabilitating the planet. When Lilith Iyapo is "awakened", she finds that she has been chosen to revive her fellow humans in small groups by first preparing them to meet the utterly terrifying aliens, then training them to survive on the wilderness that the planet has become. But the aliens cannot help humanity without altering it forever.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • I couldn't tell if I loved it or hated it.

  • By Lindsay on 01-31-16

Felt like a novel for teen girls

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-01-17

I was disappointed in just about everything in this book. The plot was full of inconsistencies, the characters were unrealistic, and their emotions and reactions gave the book a feeling of over dramatic teen angst. The narrator contributed to the feeling of a teenaged emotional roller coaster. I give this book four "Blahs".

4 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • North and South

  • By: Elizabeth Gaskell
  • Narrated by: Juliet Stevenson
  • Length: 18 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,078
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,669
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,686

Written at the request of Charles Dickens, North and South is a book about rebellion that poses fundamental questions about the nature of social authority and obedience. Gaskell expertly blends individual feeling with social concern and her heroine, Margaret Hale, is one of the most original creations of Victorian literature. When Margaret Hale's father leaves the Church in a crisis of conscience she is forced to leave her comfortable home in the tranquil countryside of Hampshire....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Delightful

  • By Sally on 01-04-10

Gloom, gloom, gloom

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-25-17

I read several reviewers making analogies between this story and those of Jane Austen. I beg to differ. I found the emotions of the characters in this story lacking in the complexity of Austen's. They seemed shallow, histrionic, and unlikable. The story itself dragged on far too long in the beginning chapters and was far too gloomy, and then ended too abruptly at the end. It was like the author spent months or years writing the first part and then dashed off the end because her publisher was threatening to take back her advance. At least five characters died but I felt no shock, no sorrowbecause it was impossible to get emotionally attached to anyone in this tale. I would not consider reading another book by this author. The narrator was phenomenal, but she couldn't rescue a bad tale.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Life’s Ratchet

  • How Molecular Machines Extract Order from Chaos
  • By: Peter M. Hoffman
  • Narrated by: Paul Hodgson
  • Length: 9 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 329
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 285
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 281

The cells in our bodies consist of molecules, made up of the same carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen atoms found in air and rocks. But molecules, such as water and sugar, are not alive. So how do our cells - assemblies of otherwise "dead" molecules - come to life, and together constitute a living being? In Life’s Ratchet, physicist Peter M. Hoffmann locates the answer to this age-old question at the nanoscale.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • For biologists to learn single molecule biophysics

  • By A Synthetic Biologist on 09-04-14

Very accessible book on molecular biology

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-05-16

I found this book to contain a fascinating and highly understandable explanation of how chance, chaos, and necessity work in concert to form life. I haven't taken a biology course since the 1960s, so that gives you an idea of how little I knew about the topic before. The author carefully walks the reader through his arguments using excellent but simple analogies. It helps to have some understanding of scientific terms like entropy, however. I found myself hopping on YouTobe to look at animations of kinesins, myosins, and other molecular machines as the narrator described their processes. The visual aids really helped me understand his descriptions. Beware, though, that many of the animations are hosted by Creationists, who use the beauty and complexity of molecular machines to argue for intelligent design, The author dismantles those arguments near the end of the book, Glad I bought this. I will definitely read it again.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Like a Mighty Army

  • Safehold, Book 7
  • By: David Weber
  • Narrated by: Oliver Wyman
  • Length: 27 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,562
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,425
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,430

For centuries, the world of Safehold, last redoubt of the human race, lay under the unchallenged rule of the Church of God Awaiting. The Church permitted nothing new - no new inventions, no new understandings of the world.What no one knew was that the Church was an elaborate fraud - a high-tech system established by a rebel faction of Safehold’s founders, meant to keep humanity hidden from the powerful alien race that had destroyed old Earth.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • A long suffering reader ploughs on

  • By Roy J. Meek on 03-08-14

Sloppy, but satisfying.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-25-16

The last few books in this series have felt like David Weber has been dashing them off as fast as he can. If one more character gives someone "a crooked smile", I'm going to scream. It's a relief to have Oliver Wyman back as narrator however, which makes "Like a Mighty Army" worth a listen. (Skip the audible version of "Midst Toil and Tribulation", because narrator Kevin Collins sounds like an over-acting junior high school drama student in his first role. Exhausting).The Safehold series is fun and the characters are engaging. This one is no exception. The plots of the 7 books have moved forward
glacially slowly, presumably because Weber spins so many technical details. I think that's part of his charm. But at this rate, Weber will have to be writing from a nursing home by the time he gets to the Gbaba.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • By Heresies Distressed

  • Safehold Series, Book 3
  • By: David Weber
  • Narrated by: Jason Culp
  • Length: 24 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,739
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,411
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,418

Now the battle for the soul of the planet Safehold has begun.The Kingdom of Charis and the Kingdom of Chisholm have joined together, pledged to stand against the tyranny of a corrupt Church. The youthful Queen Sharleyan of Chisholm has wed King Cayleb of Charis, forging a single dynasty, a single empire, dedicated to the defense of human freedom.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • I want Oliver Wyman back

  • By James on 07-14-09

Comes across as written too rapidly

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-27-16

I really enjoyed Armageddon Reef and I think the characters, the world and its dilemmas that Weber has invented are compelling. The writing of novels 2 and 3 is not up to that of the first book, however. If the author mentions a character giving a "crooked smile" one more time, I'm going to scream. He must have used that phrase at least 100 times in this book alone. The new narrator's choice of voices is not up to the standards of the voices used by the narrator of the first two books. He obviously didn't listen to the first narrator at all. The story is still compelling, but the overall feel of this book is that Weber is sloppily cranking the rest of the series out.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Never Too Late

  • By: Robyn Carr
  • Narrated by:  Therese Plummer
  • Length: 10 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,598
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,455
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,454

Clare Wilson is starting over. She's had it with her marriage to a charming serial cheater. Even her own son thinks she's given his father too many chances. With the support of her sisters, Maggie and Sarah, she's ready to move on. Facing her 40th birthday, Clare is finally feeling the rush of unadulterated freedom.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • 15 Years Too Late

  • By Rusty on 07-28-15

Trite Harlequin Romance

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-06-16

I bought this as an Audible Daily Deal, so fortunately I didn't waste a lot of money on it. The story is a middle aged woman fantasy tale, starring hard-bodied, sensitive, and responsible men and gorgeous women. It is silly and predictable. Enough said.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Scattered Suns

  • The Saga of Seven Suns, Book 4
  • By: Kevin J. Anderson
  • Narrated by: David Colacci
  • Length: 20 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,341
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 886
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 889

The war between the alien hydrogues and the faeros rages, reducing suns to blackened shells - including one of the fabled seven suns of the Ildiran Empire. Instead of protecting themselves, the Ildirans engage in bloody civil war and the many factions of humanity are bitterly divided. Can mankind and Ildirans overcome their own internal fighting to face a deadly new enemy that is ready to annihilate them?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • GREAT Series....Narrator change from Book 4 on

  • By Bowlie on 09-02-11

Loved the story, but narrator drove me crazy

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-02-15

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

The fourth novel in The Saga of the Seven Suns did not disappoint. The story started off with excitement and it continued throughout. Basil Wenceslas gets crazier, the Ildiran empire undergoes profound changes, and the Roamers are forced to become even more resourceful. Old questions are answered and new questions arise, setting the stage for continuation of the saga. I did not like the new narrator. He used a British accent for Ildirans, a lame Jersey accent for Rlinda Kett and BeBob, and a kind of Texas accent for Roamers. I couldn't tell who was supposed to be speaking during Ildiran dialogue because they all sounded like the same British aristocrat. The Jersey accent was just annoying.

What aspect of David Colacci’s performance would you have changed?

You would think that a professional who is narrating the fourth novel in a series which had a different narrator for the first three books would take the time to listen to how names were pronounced in the earlier books. Instead, Colacci had his own take on the names of several characters. My nerves grated every time he said Tasia Tamblyn's name. He was very inconsistent on the names of the compys. RU became "Roo", for instance, even though some of the other compys had two consonants for a name, which he couldn't run together. You think he'd get a clue. The narration greatly detracted from my enjoyment of the book.

Any additional comments?

I bought a hard copy of book 5 so I can enjoy the story without getting ticked off at the narrator.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful