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David

Dunedin, FL, United States
  • 14
  • reviews
  • 43
  • helpful votes
  • 24
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  • Outland

  • By: Dennis E. Taylor
  • Narrated by: Ray Porter
  • Length: 10 hrs and 29 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,824
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 4,564
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,549

When an experiment to study quantum uncertainty goes spectacularly wrong, physics student Bill Rustad and his friends find that they have accidentally created an inter-dimensional portal. They connect to Outland - an alternate Earth with identical geology, but where humans never evolved. The group races to establish control of the portal before the government, the military, or evildoers can take it away. Then everything changes when the Yellowstone supervolcano erupts in an explosion large enough to destroy civilization and kill half the planet.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Just plain fun and never dull.

  • By Kenneth Wieland on 05-19-19

Looks To Be Another Fun and Interesting Series

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-27-19

I got introduced to Ray Porter's work through the Bobiverse series which I thought of as an entertaining storyline with a very creative premise based on explainable and understandable science. This series looks to be much the same. The best thing about his writing is that he doesn't appear to care as much about creating a big time science fiction epic that takes itself too seriously. He fills his stories with characters you can easily identify with due to their normal, everyday human qualities very much like people you've probably met or have known. It's just that they're placed into unusual and sometimes difficult situations that often require creative solutions, both scientific and otherwise.

The problem some people might have with this book is it might not be serious enough for them. It's very light-hearted and entertaining. But in my opinion, there's nothing wrong with that. Clearly the idea that a bunch of graduate level college students in a variety of disciplines could come up with a way of creating the technology that allows people to easily walk through a portal into another version of Earth challenges credibility. But on the other hand it's a very fun "what if" exercise that keeps you captivated. And what on Earth...or any other version of Earth, is wrong with being entertained, as long as the scientific basis appears to be solid.

2 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • What Happened That Night

  • A Novel
  • By: Sandra Block
  • Narrated by: Joel Richards, Karissa Vacker
  • Length: 11 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 83
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 80
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 80

She doesn't remember that night. But she will never be the same. One moment, Dahlia is a successful Harvard student; the next, she wakes up from a party, the victim of a brutal assault. Her life veers into a tailspin, and what's worse - her memory of the attack has been ripped away, leaving a cold rage in its wake. Now, years later, Dahlia is a tattooed paralegal suffering from PTSD and still haunted by that night. Until one day, a video surfaces online, and Dahlia sees her attack for the first time. Now she knows what happened to her. And she knows who is to blame.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • My favourite so far this year!

  • By Yikes on 07-08-18

Decent Idea...But Poorly Executed

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-31-18

This was my first book by this author, and I doubt I'll read any more from her after this. I was able to get through the book, but it wasn't due to the story itself nudging me forward. The further I got into the book was like sludging through mud to the inevitable ending I had predicted before I even got to the halfway point in the story.

First, the good. I found the idea behind the story was pretty interesting. There are all sorts of revenge type stories, but this has a bit smarter and more (seamingly) modern take on the idea. It was intriguing enough that it kept me going once the pace fell off and got sluggish. Secondly the narration was above average, just not exceptional. I found the concept of first person storytelling from different points of view to be creative and different, and the changes between different narrators didn't really bother me. The weakness in the narration was the female narrator's Boston accent for the character specified to have a heavy Boston accent was really weak. Other than that, narration was well done.

Unfortunately, now you have the bad and there's plenty of it. The author uses flashback sequences throughout the book to fill in details about the core conflict that happened 5 years prior to the telling of this story. The intermittent breaks in the storyline were fine in the beginning, but she carries these flashback chapters on for far too long in the book until they're no longer adding anything to the story and are just slowing down the pace...and creating more sludge to wade through for little payback. This results in these extra chapters taking away from the main process in the revenge story leaving very little left for the details involved in the execution of and response to the different revenge plans, so it becomes more fantasy requiring the reader to suspend belief in how the real world actually works in order to just accept things and move forward with the story. It's more like a deep idea with very naive and shallow storytelling.

My major complaint with this author was the overall shallowness of her story telling. I thought Harvard educated people with A-type competitive personalities were supposed to be intelligent people with a broad understanding of how things in the world work, but you couldn't prove that by the characters she created in this book. She totally missed the opportunity to have very smart and inventive protagonists and antagonists squaring off with each other in surprising and creative ways reflective of their intelligence and cunning. Believe me...none of that was happening here.

The most pitiful aspect of the book was her inclusion of adequately politically correct characters...I'm supposing to add to the "coolness" factor in today's media world. I could have accepted the idea of a gay best friend. That could happen even though it's a totally overused gimmick in much of the schlock stories you see used in cable TV series, but then to add another character with gender identity problems was just taking it a bit too far for no substantial reason especially given the focus of what the main story was supposed to be about. She would have been better off focusing on the execution of the plot by intelligent people than these sort of gimmicks that added nothing of real substance. You don't have to have a degree in mathematics to understand the very low probability of both of those type of characters playing a substantial part in one person's life given the rather tiny ratio of those people in society as a whole.

I will freely admit that I may have had too high an expectation for this book given that most of my reading comes from much more well developed authors of thrillers and mysteries...but believe me when I say this author is no Nelson DeMille or Michael Connelly, so don't go in with that kind of expectation and you might be okay.

  • The Outsider

  • By: Stephen King
  • Narrated by: Will Patton
  • Length: 18 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 41,427
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 37,914
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 37,743

An 11-year-old boy's violated corpse is found in a town park. Eyewitnesses and fingerprints point unmistakably to one of Flint City's most popular citizens. He is Terry Maitland, Little League coach, English teacher, husband, and father of two girls. Detective Ralph Anderson, whose son Maitland once coached, orders a quick and very public arrest. Maitland has an alibi, but Anderson and the district attorney soon add DNA evidence to go with the fingerprints and witnesses. Their case seems ironclad.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Will Patton great - story so so

  • By Randall on 06-19-18

Stop Whispering!!!!!

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-30-18

This is the first book I've ever had to return in over 4 years with Audible. To be honest the story showed promise but the narrator was so bad as to literally be unlistenable. The longer I listened the more aggravated I got until about halfway through I couldn't take his ridiculous whispering and yelling. Bear in mind I have never once had a problem with a narrator. Some have been better than others, but I've never had one so bad I had to return the book. The swings in volume were such that in some cases I could barely make out what he was saying through his mumbled whispering...even at full volume. He mumbled and whispers during normal everyday conversations. Not for effect...just to be whispering and mumbling for no reason. To make matters worse he'll go from a quiet whisper direct into yelling. Try managing that with your volume control. This guy is an absolute pain and amateur and it's a shame I have to miss out on this Stephen King book all because of him. I just couldn't take the torture any longer

25 of 33 people found this review helpful

  • Infinite

  • By: Jeremy Robinson
  • Narrated by: R.C. Bray
  • Length: 10 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,313
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,617
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 11,606

The Galahad, a faster-than-light spacecraft, carries 50 scientists and engineers on a mission to prepare Kepler 452b, Earth's nearest habitable neighbor at 1400 light years away. With Earth no longer habitable and the Mars colony slowly failing, they are humanity's best hope. After 10 years in a failed cryogenic bed - body asleep, mind awake - William Chanokh's torture comes to an end as the fog clears, the hatch opens, and his friend and fellow hacker, Tom, greets him...by stabbing a screwdriver into his heart. This is the first time William dies.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • a rather complex science fiction story

  • By AudioBook Reviewer on 12-26-17

Some Interesting Concepts That Don't Go Anywhere

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-05-18

This was my first book by Jeremy Robinson. I've been a long time science fiction reader, but lost interest in the genre over the last couple of decades until recently trying out a few of the more popular books. For the most part I haven't been disappointed, until this one.

I bit on it due to the reviews of this book as well as some of his other books so I figured it might be a good bet. To be honest the publisher's summary didn't build a lot of excitement so it took a while before I went ahead and spent the credit. I have to say this author has an engaging writing style and is pretty easy to listen to, but the storyline wasn't up to par with the quality of other science fiction books I've been reading recently.

The first half of the book shows great promise even if it's premised on something of an overused cliche' of finding a prospective new home planet so humans won't become extinct from abuses brought on by their own human shortsightedness and character flaws. In that regard it has some of the problem solving aspects of 'The Martian', but without the hard science. It still flows pretty well, and has a couple of surprises but at the halfway point the major conflict is generally resolved. From that point on it becomes somewhat of a tired space opera of encountering a conflict, life and death struggle, all appears lost, then a last minute save...then onto the next space opera sequence. Then it finally fizzles out with a nothing ending.

The sad part of all of this is the first half of the book is actually interesting and results in a somewhat startling discovery. But there's no real investigation of that discovery to find out the truth behind it which would have lent itself to maybe a much more creative and intriguing plotline. Instead it just space jumps around into a couple of new adventures and then fizzles.

Maybe it's just me and my expectations were too high from having been a sci-fi reader for 5 decades having been exposed to hall of fame authors like Phillip K Dick, Felipe Jose Farmer, Asimov, Harlan Ellison and others. But this book doesn't live up to that level of storytelling, and it's probably going to be hard to convince me to give this author another try.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Two Kinds of Truth

  • By: Michael Connelly
  • Narrated by: Titus Welliver
  • Length: 9 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,655
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,705
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,646

Harry Bosch is back as a volunteer working cold cases for the San Fernando Police Department and is called out to a local drugstore where a young pharmacist has been murdered. Bosch and the town's three-person detective squad sift through the clues, which lead into the dangerous, big business world of pill mills and prescription drug abuse.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Bosch Survives Two Career Ending Threats

  • By Russell on 11-20-17

Good...but not up to my normal expectations

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-02-17

I bought this on the day it came out and finished it in two days. Obviously I'm a big fan of Michael Connelly and both his Bosch character and Mickey Haller. Actually I love all of the characters Connelly creates, but Bosch will always be number 1 for me.

But he tried something a bit different this time in combining a couple of different story lines into one book. I understand the purpose of it in that the book is almost half Bosch and half Haller, and it's not a bad combination. The story flows along well as is evidence by my finishing it in two days. The problems I have with it is that the culmination of both stories ends up being somewhat rushed and less believable than most of his stories. All of the good stuff is still there in terms of evidence and procedure, but the climax in both cases is not up to his normal standards on either of the plot lines.

Other than that, the book was entertaining and Titus Wlliver does an EXCELLENT job on both Bosch and Haller. In fact, in some cases you can hear a little bit of Matthew McConaughy seeping through which was quite entertaining.

One other small problem I have with this book. I've recently seen a trend among some of my favorite writers throwing in a bit of national political narrative or barbs at one side of the aisle or the other. It's getting very tiresome. First, I see this author is a very fine fiction author, but there's nothing in his background that would suggest to me he has any great insight into politics other than to follow along with the talking points and rhetoric of one side or the other. No original thoughts or insights. So why subject me as a reader to it? Especially when I came to read a crime mystery novel and it has nothing to do with the story. You accomplish nothing by it other than to alienate readers..so what's the point?

I came here for a good mystery story and I couldn't care less about your (or any other author, actor, or generally famous person's) political orientation.

3 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • The Late Show

  • By: Michael Connelly
  • Narrated by: Katherine Moennig
  • Length: 9 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,863
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 9,077
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,037

Renée Ballard works the night shift in Hollywood, beginning many investigations but finishing none, as each morning she turns her cases over to day shift detectives. A once up-and-coming detective, she's been given this beat as punishment after filing a sexual harassment complaint against a supervisor. But one night she catches two cases she doesn't want to part with: the brutal beating of a prostitute left for dead in a parking lot and the killing of a young woman in a nightclub shooting. Ballard is determined not to give up at dawn.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Oh, the narration!

  • By Destry on 07-20-17

A Fitting Character to Carry On the Bosch Legacy

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-22-17

Any additional comments?

I've been a huge Harry Bosch fan for years now and have followed all of the great characters created by Michael Connelly. He never ceases to amaze me as a great storyteller and character creator, and Rene'e Ballard is certainly no exception. Although a detective with the LAPD and somewhat of a lone wolf, the comparison with Harry Bosch pretty much ends there. She has her own family dynamic, her own distinctive life and her own driven motivations, but different from those of Harry. I still love all the Harry Bosch stories, but it's getting harder and harder to find ways to keep him actively involved in detective work as he gets older. So I truly believe Rene'e will carry all of us fans into the future for many, many years to come.

The storyline is classic Michael Connelly with all the great pacing, investigation, intrigue, twists and turns, and of course, the politics and drama involved in the LAPD. Ballard is just a driven as Bosch, but has a deeper sense of ethics and integrity in the way she approaches things. She bends the rules a bit, but stops short of the Godzilla versus Tokyo approach Bosch uses sometimes. I like that, because it causes a lot more internal struggles for her which makes her a more interesting person. She still can get into some trouble, but is always ultimately in the right. It's also nice that she's a woman as it gives us a greater sense of the struggles a woman might have in dealing with a predominantly male environment.

There's been a lot of negative comments made about the narrator. Some of it I agree with, some of it is way overstated. She's not the best, nor is she the worst. She kept me involved in the story which is all that really matters. The only time I was ever confused was when there is a conversation between two characters. Because she doesn't really change the tone of her voice in any way it sometimes was confusing who was speaking during an interchange. That would be the one thing I hope she does better in the future if she continues to narrate this series.

In short, if you want to catch the next wave after Harry Bosch, this is where it all starts (that statement will be more meaningful to you once you read the book).

  • The Crossing

  • By: Michael Connelly
  • Narrated by: Titus Welliver
  • Length: 9 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13,852
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,621
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,567

Detective Harry Bosch has retired from the LAPD, but his half-brother, defense attorney Mickey Haller, needs his help. The murder rap against his client seems ironclad, but Mickey is sure it's a setup. Though it goes against all his instincts, Bosch takes the case. With the secret help of his former LAPD partner, Lucia Soto, he turns the investigation inside the police department. But as Bosch gets closer to discovering the truth, he makes himself a target.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I just loved this book; every last bit of it

  • By Michele B on 11-10-15

Michael Connelly Returns to Great Form

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-16-15

Any additional comments?

I was a bit concerned about what I would get with this book. I've read all of Connelly's work and out of everything his last Bosch book "The Burnin Room" was probably my least favorite. I was concerned that the link-up with his Lincoln Lawyer half-brother might be more of a gimmick than a true procedural investigative work like most of his earlier Bosch books. But I'm glad to report Connelly has returned to the basics most of his readers have loved about him from the beginning.

This is a real Harry Bosch story with Micky Haller playing a relatively small role, but an important one that helps crystalize the differences in the perspective of the two characters. Bosch is back to working the murder book procured by Haller through discovery and letting the clues and the overlooked details drive him toward the truth, and that's what makes this story so fascinating. It's not a story that has any real amazing twists and turns, but even that gets old after of few of these kind of books. This just plows ahead relentlessly uncovering the small details in the way you'd expect Bosch to do that eventually lead to uncovering and resolving the big, overall picture of what really happened. And that's important and realistic in this case because it ultimately has to be proven beyond a reasonable doubt in a court of law. Kuddos to Micheal Connelly for addressing the needs of both sides of the justice picture and doing it very elegantly.

The narrator, Titus Welliver who plays the screen version of Bosch, makes him all that much more familiar and comfortable to us because he is quickly becoming the voice and actor of the role. I personally could not be happier with the choice.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Blood Hollow

  • By: William Kent Krueger
  • Narrated by: David Chandler
  • Length: 11 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 942
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 805
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 803

After 17-year-old Charlotte Kane, the beautiful, brilliant, and brooding daughter of a rich widower, disappears on a drunken New Years' Eve snowmobile ride, a raging blizzard soon snuffs out all search efforts. When her body is found during the spring thaw four months later, preliminary evidence implicates her ex-boyfriend: Ojibwe bad-boy Solemn Winter Moon. But then a second Charlotte Kane turns up dead, and Cork isn't sure of anything any more.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Minnesota Mysteries Evolve

  • By Sara on 01-12-17

Kreuger is to Minnesota what Connelly is to LA

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-29-15

Any additional comments?

I've just finished the first 4 books of this series over the last two weeks. I'm a huge fan of crime mysteries and have read many of the more popular authors of this type of genre including Michael Connelly, CJ Box, Craig Johnson, Robert Crais, and Harlen Coben to mention a few. Up until now I've enjoyed them all, but didn't think any of them would ever compare to Micheal Connelly and the Harry Bosch series. Well I'm here to tell you there's some competition in town now.

Although William Kent Kreugar may not have the intricate and surprising plot twists like Connelly, he more than makes up for it with his cast of characters and a very believable and relatable protagonist and his family living in a very unique area. There is always some form of moral conflict at the center of each of his stories and Blood Hollow is no different.

Don't be put off by the few that have problems with the Christian or Catholic underpinnings of this story. There has always been a very predominant aspect of spirituality in all of the books in this series. Mostly it's been oriented around Native American spirituality with just a few references to Cork O'Conner and his family's Catholic heritage. That never bothered anyone until the Christian heritage became more predominant in this book. I guess for some people mentioning Christianity is akin to "preaching" whereas native american spirituality isn't...go figure.

At any rate, this is a top-notch story told in a powerful and believable way that allows one to feel a real connection to the events and the people involved. What draws me into this book as well as his previous books is enjoying how the characters grow and change from the things they experience. By the time I get to the end I feel nearly as exhausted as the characters because I've been on the ride with them. And I also take away little bits of wisdom I've absorbed during the process that I can take with me on my own personal journey. To me, that's a pretty good deal.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Scarecrow

  • By: Michael Connelly
  • Narrated by: Peter Giles
  • Length: 11 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,534
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,722
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,715

Forced out of the Los Angeles Times amid the latest budget cuts, newspaperman Jack McEvoy decides to go out with a bang, using his final days at the paper to write the definitive murder story of his career. He focuses on Alonzo Winslow, a 16-year-old drug dealer in jail after confessing to a brutal murder. But as he delves into the story, Jack realizes that Winslow's so-called confession is bogus. The kid might actually be innocent.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Great newsman fiction from Connelly

  • By Tony B. on 08-18-09

Connelly At His Best!!!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-17-13

Any additional comments?

This completes my collection of Micheal Connelly books, and it could not have been a better choice. After reading all of his other books, I turned to reading some other authors just to compare. After doing so and coming back for my final Connelly book I can say there is no comparison. Connelly simply sets the standard for this genre that others aspire to. And this book exemplifies why.

Over the years Connelly has created a universe of characters from Detective Harry Bosch, to FBI Agent Rachael Walling, to Defense Lawyer Mickey Haller (The Lincoln Lawyer), FBI Agent Terry Caleb (Bloodwork), to journalist Jack McEvoy. What makes him unique is how his stories interweave all of these characters and these character's awareness and interactions with each other. This book was probably the best at doing so with references to almost all the other characters he's created. This was particularly great for me reading this book after all the others. I think someone could easily enjoy this book without any prior knowledge of Connelly's universe of characters, but it's a plus if you've read his other books.

What really separates this book from most of his other work, and 90% of most other mystery/thrillers is we know who the bad guy is from the very start. Therefore it becomes a chess match between the bad guy and Jack McEvoy as he pursues the story (along with FBI Agent Rachael Walling). The fun is not in finding out who the bad guy is, but watching the story unfold into the ultimate collision you know is coming. This is perfect for Michael Connelly's style of writing as his true strong point is his relentless pacing. This proves you don't have to have a ton of characters with lots of twists and dead ends to keep track of to keep a story interesting. Having a limited number of characters each strategizing their moves in reaction to the others is even more exciting.

Although one might see some similarities in his plotline to the 1997 "Live Free or Die Hard" movie due to the similarities in the antagonists being cyber bad guys, this is a FAR more plausible scenario than the one in the Die Hard movie (Die Hard not believable??? Say it ain't so!!!). As a software engineer with over 40 years of experience, I can't say there was anything that jumped out at me as a glaring technical error. Clearly Connelly does a great job at researching his subject in order to make it believable.

There are many memorable stories I've read by Michael Connelly, and I'm a HUGE fan of his Harry Bosch series. But I think this book will always be the standout for me.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Rain Gods

  • A Novel
  • By: James Lee Burke
  • Narrated by: Will Patton
  • Length: 15 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,695
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 928
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 923

When Hackberry Holland became sheriff of a tiny Texas town near the Mexican border, he'd hoped to leave certain things behind: his checkered reputation, his haunted dreams, and his obsessive memories of the good life with his late wife, Rie. But the discovery of the bodies of nine illegal aliens, machine-gunned to death and buried in a shallow grave behind a church, soon makes it clear that he won't escape so easily.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Divided Loyalties and Sultry Prose

  • By Catherine on 07-25-09

Ehhh...Not So Much

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-21-13

Any additional comments?

This was my first book for this particular author. I took a chance on him due to his awards from the Mystery Writers of America. I guess I won't use that logic anymore.

The best part of this book was the narrator. Mr. Patton is very talented and is able to create clearly distinguishable voices for each of the characters. His weakness is in portraying a Texas accent similar to George Bush's, which is not your typical Texas accent. Most people won't notice this so much. I'm just a bit picky as a 6th generation Texan.

As for the storyline, I can't say i was terribly impressed at all with any level of creativity or imagination. As many previous reviewers have stated, there seems to be a lot of plot elements and characters "borrowed" from "No Country for Old Men". It's a bit broader than "No Country", but fundamentally the same ideas. In much the same way, don't look for any real "loose end" culminations. This story is similar in many ways to a greek drama with multiple threads spinning off of the main plot line, but each one just kind of languishes and ends at various points in the book rather than gravitating back toward each other with a grand resolution in the end.

My single greatest problem with this author is the same stylistic problems that ultimately lead me away from Stephen King books. Like Stephen King, this author takes a LOT of pages to tell a relatively simple story. Much of this is due to his extraordinarily verbose descriptions lavishly mixed in making it quite tedious to get to the point of what's actually occuring or is about to occur. How many ways are there to describe a sunset, or a person, or a room...according to this author, apparently there's never enough. Mix that in with constant backstory ruminations by each of the characters and this storyline could have just as easily been effectively told in half the time it actually took.Some people may like that type of writing, but as for me I get more pleasure out of using my own imagination to create these scenes rather than depending solely on the author. That's a big part of why I prefer books over movies. I get to decide on how I want to create the environment. As an author, he or she should only give me some basic hints of what things are like and let ME create the context in my own mind.

As things stand, I doubt I'll be coming back to this author for any other books. There are so many other mystery and thriller writers that suit my taste better than him.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful