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  • 23
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  • Sherlock Holmes

  • By: Arthur Conan Doyle, Stephen Fry - introductions
  • Narrated by: Stephen Fry
  • Length: 62 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 6,459
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 6,039
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 6,001

Ever since he made his first appearance in A Study In Scarlet, Sherlock Holmes has enthralled and delighted millions of fans throughout the world. Now Audible is proud to present Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes, read by Stephen Fry. A lifelong fan of Doyle's detective fiction, Fry has narrated the definitive collection of Sherlock Holmes - four novels and four collections of short stories. And, exclusively for Audible, Stephen has written and narrated eight insightful introductions, one for each title.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Chapter Guide!

  • By Katya Rice on 05-25-18

Holy Mackeral!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-25-17

What did you love best about Sherlock Holmes?

I'm a long-term Holmes fan, but it's been a while since I revisited the original stories. Fry's performance was absolutely over the top. In many ways better than a visual medium, because so much is left to the imagination, but aided again by Fry's performance. And his personal introductions parallel mine as well.

What other book might you compare Sherlock Holmes to and why?

Don't have a parallel. Wish there were.

What does Stephen Fry bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

Bringing separate characters to life through accents, patterns and the like. Absolutely brings the experience to life and makes it unique/

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

Holmes done right

  • True Porn Clerk Stories

  • By: Ali Davis
  • Narrated by: Ali Davis
  • Length: 3 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 585
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 545
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 543

Queue up these hilarious real-life stories from the video clerking trenches. You'll laugh. You'll cry. You'll wash your hands. No rewinding required!

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Sad has never been so hilarious

  • By RMB on 10-07-14

Great insight and stories

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-12-17

Where does True Porn Clerk Stories rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

This is one of the better conversions from print to audio (I suspect). Ali's voice adds to both the plusses and minuses of the job, characters and the industry as a whole.

  • Team of Teams by General Stanley McChrystal

  • Key Takeaways & Analysis: New Rules of Engagement for a Complex World
  • By: Instaread
  • Narrated by: Michael Gilboe
  • Length: 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 44
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 40
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 37

Team of Teams by General Stanley McChrystal is an examination of the process he began of restructuring the Joint Special Operations Command management style, from a rigid command structure to a cooperative team comprised of smaller specialized teams. While fighting Al-Qaeda in Iraq (AQI), General McChrystal noted how the United States and coalition militaries were efficient war-fighting machines, but they were not adaptable or effective against the seemingly disordered AQI.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Kind of awful audio version of a fascinating book

  • By Athena L. on 05-13-18

Use for deciding to read the entire book or not

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-06-16

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

If you're considering reading "Team of Teams" this summary is worthwhile. If you're looking to gain the same value as reading the whole thing, forget it. I had the chance to hear McChrystal last week and was pleasantly surprised. Instead of hearing a review of his leadership and military experience (interesting but not terribly useful) he gave what I considered valuable insight into some of the changes many organizations (including terrorist and military organizations) are going through.

  • Small Data

  • The Tiny Clues That Uncover Huge Trends
  • By: Martin Lindstrom
  • Narrated by: Ricco Fajardo
  • Length: 8 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 531
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 487
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 483

Martin Lindstrom, a modern-day Sherlock Holmes, harnesses the power of "small data" in his quest to discover the next big thing. Hired by the world's leading brands to find out what makes their customers tick, Martin Lindstrom spends 300 nights a year in strangers' homes, carefully observing every detail in order to uncover their hidden desires and, ultimately, the clues to a multimillion-dollar product.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fascinating!!

  • By Fact addict on 03-08-16

A great alternative perspective from Big Data

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-02-16

What did you love best about Small Data?

Good narrative. Introduced a different perspective and stuck with it throughout the book.

Any additional comments?

Ok, if you’re anywhere near the IT world, you’ve heard the term “Big Data.” The concept is actually rather simple. Gather as much data (from as many sources) as possible on a huge scale. Use the data to measure performance (ie, KPI’s or Key Performance Indicators). But also use it to ask questions (data analytics), and to help guide the offerings to your customers (think Amazon’s “People who bought XYZ also bought ABC”).
But is there an alternative? Can we get so caught up in that Big Data concept that we’re missing what’s right under our noses?
Enter Martin Lindstrom. Part Marketing gent, part Sherlock Holmes. His approach is different. To actually observe people on an individual level and look for behavioral clues that might offer insight. As an example, what the layout of magnets on refrigerators imply in terms of customer needs.
It’s an interesting concept. And one that actually goes beyond (in my humble opinion) beyond the marketing research questions proposed by the author. Cold hard analytics are only as good as the questions from the analysts and how they organize the data. A simple example: If you looked at the sales figures for a retail store specializing in Christmas good without taking the seasonal aspects into account, you’d have trouble understanding the figures.
That’s not to say that from one observation all conclusions fall immediately into place. It’s more complicated than that.
But when you look at Big Data, the goal is to take that macroscopic view and work it down so it has a positive impact on both the organization and customers. The same is true for Small Data. Looking at small behavioral patterns and from that build up to understanding how segments of society consume both product and marketing messages.
It’s a great read, even if it serves to show another perspective to gathering and analyzing data.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

Sapiens audiobook cover art
  • Sapiens

  • A Brief History of Humankind
  • By: Yuval Noah Harari
  • Narrated by: Derek Perkins
  • Length: 15 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17,639
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15,699
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15,608

One hundred thousand years ago, at least six human species inhabited the Earth. Today there is just one. Us. Homo sapiens. How did our species succeed in the battle for dominance? Why did our foraging ancestors come together to create cities and kingdoms? How did we come to believe in gods, nations, and human rights; to trust money, books, and laws; and to be enslaved by bureaucracy, timetables, and consumerism?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Sums it up nicely

  • By Mark on 05-15-15

Great read

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-30-16

Any additional comments?

Recently I’ve been interested (not consciously) with sociology…actually developing a greater respect for the science (I was going to put quotes around science, but nope!). It’s actually an interesting journey.

Why Homo Sapiens? Why not Neanderthal, or any of the half dozen or so human species that existed on this planet only one hundred thousand years ago? And how does the answer to that question permeate much of how society has evolved?

Human beings can only handle a “tribe” or collection of about 150 people. That’s one of the concepts that’s been drilled into my head over the past year from several sources. Beyond that, we can’t keep track. So we’ve created logical constructs (cities, states, countries, religions, political parties, etc) that help us work on larger scales.

And that, the ability to work with these constructs, is what makes us different. By using constructs we’re able to mentally handle larger, different, and in some cases non-existent issues. “Let’s make 325 million people great again!” Sounds impossible. “Let’s make America great again!” Ok, now it’s a bumper sticker.

When you think about it, the only reason we’re able to make this work is we all buy into the make-believe stuff. I own a company. I live in my house. My credit card allows me to acquire goods and services easily. Millennia of development of these invented concepts such as “company,” “ownership,” “money” and “credit.” And they only work today because we all believe in them.

The author is decidedly slanted in his perspective on some aspects of these concepts, most notably religion (the word “myths” comes up frequently). It’s not a slam on the concept, but many might find it either offensive or a little disconcerting (I found it neither).

All told, great book. Interesting perspective on how we as a species developed.

  • Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World

  • By: Jack Weatherford
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Davis, Jack Weatherford
  • Length: 14 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,773
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,555
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,571

The Mongol army led by Genghis Khan subjugated more lands and people in 25 years than the Romans did in 400. In nearly every country the Mongols conquered, they brought an unprecedented rise in cultural communication, expanded trade, and a blossoming of civilization.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliant, insightful, intriguing.

  • By Peter on 03-05-10

I'm ashamed of what I didn't know about this guy..

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-31-15

Would you listen to Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World again? Why?

I'm not much in the repeat reading/listening, so I'm the wrong person to ask.

What was one of the most memorable moments of Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World?

sections dealing with the non-military aspects of this guy. Fascinating.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

close.

Any additional comments?

A great book. I read a lot of history, and am embarrassed to confess my ignorance to what this guy (and *some* of his descendants) were able to do and how in some ways they implemented a more "just" and "humane" society than what we have today.

  • The Silo Effect

  • The Peril of Expertise and the Promise of Breaking Down Barriers
  • By: Gillian Tett
  • Narrated by: Fiona Hardingham
  • Length: 10 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 103
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 86
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 82

From award-winning columnist and journalist Gillian Tett comes a brilliant examination of how our tendency to create functional departments - silos - hinders our work and how some people and organizations can break those silos down to unleash innovation.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Mediocre reader and weakly supported thesis

  • By John Bailey on 10-28-15

Good, not great

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-31-15

What did you love best about The Silo Effect?

First section (introduction to Silos and links to Anthropology) were actually interesting and a perspective I hadn't had before.

Who was your favorite character and why?

I liked the commas

Have you listened to any of Fiona Hardingham’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

I could listen to her read a phone book. Seriously I thought it was good. A couple of the IT words were mispronounced, but no big deal.

Any additional comments?

Starts strong but gets a little bogged down with final couple of chapters. Felt like filler.

  • Black Earth

  • The Holocaust as History and Warning
  • By: Timothy Snyder
  • Narrated by: Mark Bramhall
  • Length: 16 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 299
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 263
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 263

In this epic history of extermination and survival, Timothy Snyder presents a new explanation of the great atrocity of the 20th century and reveals the risks that we face in the 21st. Based on new sources from Eastern Europe and forgotten testimonies from Jewish survivors, Black Earth recounts the mass murder of the Jews as an event that is still close to us, more comprehensible than we would like to think and thus all the more terrifying.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Tough book but worth it!

  • By Amazon customer on 11-20-15

Tough book but worth it!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-20-15

What did you like best about this story?

completely new perspective

What about Mark Bramhall’s performance did you like?

good pacing

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

Wow. Just…wow. I completely misunderstood what this book was going to be about. I first heard the author as a participant in a discussion of some of the current ISIL/Syria/Iraq issues on the radio. The references to the book intrigued me, so I picked it up. I thought it was going to be using facts and details behind the Holocaust as a parallel to better understand todays fun.

Wrong. Absototalutely freaking wrong. Black Earth is a deep dive into the political maneuverings that went on in Europe leading up to (and including, although not in as much detail) World War II, specifically dealing with the Holocaust. Yup, fun reading.

Any additional comments?

This was unlike any reading I’ve discovered on the topic. First of all, I actually almost understand (yeah, that sounds freaky) where some of the delusional mindsets of Hitler came from. And why it resonated so successfully with so many people who could still (I can only assume) look themselves in the mirror each day.

Also the details behind the concepts of states and statelessness. In the case of countries that were conquered (but the “state” survived), the numbers of people killed, though tragic by any rational measure, were relatively low. But in countries where the “state” was completely destroyed (Poland for all purposes as a state ceased to exist for much of the war) almost all Jews were put to death. The author makes an interesting case that the removal of the “state” removes some of the restrictions of our base instincts. The number of people put to death within Germany itself, as an example, is significantly lower than Poland. And the number of non-Germans directly involved with the killing cannot be ignored (though I think we try).

We also tend to think of Nazis (and Hitler) as absolutely planned to a T, with his “Final Solution” in place from day one. On this topic the author points out many times where the plans of Hitler were of smaller “solutions” or conquests, but was driven in different directions by fate and miscalculation.

We all love to claim we would never do these things. We’d never turn neighbors into the police so we can claim their apartments. We’d never trick people into gathering so they can be shot. We’d never turn children away from our door when they were hiding from certain death.

But if the government was gone…completely gone? And food was scarce? And what passes for security can arrest, convict and imprison you (or worse) at the drop of a hat?

But the fact is, given the right circumstances, I suspect most of us would.
Many of us Americans (and sadly I have to include myself) love to talk a good talk. We’d never…we wouldn’t let…there’s no way we could…

But if we honestly look at how we rise to the occasion when there’s little or no risk? I dunno.
The book is split into really 4 sections. The rise of the Nazi party (and the concepts that rose with), the early years of the war, some anecdotal stories of courage, and some parallels for today. By far and away the strength of the book lies in the first two parts, although the rest was useful as well. The final section was a bit on the opinionated side, but not overly so.

All told, a difficult, disturbing and brilliant read.

13 of 13 people found this review helpful

  • Saving Capitalism

  • For the Many, Not the Few
  • By: Robert B. Reich
  • Narrated by: Robert B. Reich
  • Length: 8 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,323
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,183
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,177

In Saving Capitalism, Robert Reich reveals the entrenched cycles of power and influence that have damaged American capitalism, perpetuating a new oligarchy in which the 1 percent get ever richer and the rest - middle and working class alike - lose ever more economic agency, making for the greatest income inequality and wealth disparity since World War II.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A riveting economics book! Mind. Blown.

  • By Nothing really matters on 04-18-16

Heady topics, well explained

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-01-15

What did you love best about Saving Capitalism?

Didn't get overly political in describing things that transcend the politics of the day

What did you like best about this story?

not all blame the other guys

What does Robert B. Reich bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

He's got a delivery that's great along with the message

What’s the most interesting tidbit you’ve picked up from this book?

data behind the trends

  • The Quartet

  • Orchestrating the Second American Revolution, 1783-1789
  • By: Joseph J. Ellis
  • Narrated by: Robertson Dean
  • Length: 8 hrs and 25 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 518
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 479
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 478

From Pulitzer Prize-winning American historian Joseph J. Ellis, the unexpected story of why the 13 colonies, having just fought off the imposition of a distant centralized governing power, would decide to subordinate themselves anew.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Wonderful Gem

  • By Mike From Mesa on 10-20-15

Great perspective on a little understood period

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-05-15

If you could sum up The Quartet in three words, what would they be?

A Great listen

Who was your favorite character and why?

Amuricah. There was no individual character

Any additional comments?

In 1776 we signed the Declaration of Independence. Then we won the Revolutionary War. Then we became a Democracy. Then the Civil War happened.
To a large degree I confess to being mostly ignorant of what happened immediately following the Revolutionary War. Like most folks, I bought into the Founding Fathers worked together and figured out how to create this new Democratic Republic pretty seamlessly.
Boy, was I wrong. This is actually one of the better history books I’ve ready in a while. I illustrates the disconnect between the ineffective national government (which was truly more of a Confederacy of States than a Federal Government) and the all-powerful State governments.
For those of you who think the Founding Fathers could do no wrong and had singular goals and objectives in mind, read this book. You’ll also realize that much of the mindset was based on compromise (especially dealing with Federal versus State powers). And that much happened not because it was what all parties wanted, but what was politically doable.
The book focuses primarily on what the author sees as the four men most responsible for the creation of the constitution. George Washington, John Jay, Alexander Hamilton and James Madison take up a good share of the narrative. But there’s a decent amount of attention spent on the political issues of the day as well.
A great read,

2 of 2 people found this review helpful