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E. R. Øyre

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  • reviews
  • 0
  • helpful votes
  • 8
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  • Death in Venice

  • By: Thomas Mann
  • Narrated by: Peter Batchelor
  • Length: 3 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 126
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 112
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 113

A stunningly beautiful youth and the city of Venice set the stage for Thomas Mann’s introspective examination of erotic love and philosophical wisdom.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A problem with the narration

  • By Erez on 03-19-12

This book changed my life.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-10-18

Where do I even begin.
The story is haunting, both disturbing and beautiful. Although the plot drags on pretty slowly, it will suck you in. It will suck you into a shocking, beautiful vision of a scary, paedofiliac psycosis. And still it is all pure. There are no crimes commited, no thaughts omitted, and it is all descriptions of thoughts that both makes you sympathize with, and despice the book's main character, Herr von Aschenbach. The work hasen't left my mind since the days i first listened to is, read it, and studied it, always coming back to the book I learned to recognize as a masterpiece. Give it a try, and study it, if not, you are missing out on some great lectures on the suprising ways of the human mind.

  • Beware of Pity

  • By: Stefan Zweig
  • Narrated by: Nicholas Boulton
  • Length: 14 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 41
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 37
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 36

In the twilight of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, a young cavalry officer is invited to a dance at the home of a rich landowner. There - with a small act of attempted charity - he commits a simple faux pas. But from this seemingly insignificant blunder comes a tale of catastrophe arising from kindness and of honour poisoned by self-regard. Beware of Pity has all the intensity and the formidable sense of torment and of character of the very best of Zweig's work. Definitive translation by the award-winning Anthea Bell.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • One of my favorite authors

  • By Zaubermond on 03-21-18

You beautiful, nervous wreck!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-10-18

Zweig's story is a beautiful one, yet one i cannot relate to.


Why then do I stil like this book?
It tells the story of a young officer in an austrian cavallery regiment located in Hungary, and his ever more complicated relations with the family " Von Kékesfalva", and subsequently his many and sometimes almost childish and desperate ways of trying to escape these same complications. I hate to spoil a good plot, so I will leave it at that.
I guess much of what denies this book greatness in my eyes, it really a sign of greatness in itself, as it is the frustration and anger I feel towards the story's main character that left me with compicated feelings about the work.
But even when I was frustrated with the plot of the story, other parts of the book would always hold me, and keep me from stopping to listen.
It was, among other things, the allure of the fascinating and mysterious culture and daily life of the Austro-Hungarian empire. I had first listened to The World of Yesterday by Zweig, and wanted to hear all I could about this part of european history that I knew so little of. Zweig truly brought me enjoyment through this work, and it is one that I am sure to revisit.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • A Moveable Feast

  • By: Ernest Hemingway
  • Narrated by: James Naughton
  • Length: 4 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,498
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,158
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,162

Published posthumously in 1964, A Moveable Feast remains one of Ernest Hemingway's most beloved works. It is his classic memoir of Paris in the 1920s, filled with irreverent portraits of other expatriate luminaries such as F. Scott Fitzgerald and Gertrude Stein; tender memories of his first wife, Hadley; and insightful recollections of his own early experiments with his craft.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Hemingway without being TOO Hemingway

  • By Cathy Dopp on 09-20-06

A moveable daydreamer's feast!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-10-18

What other book might you compare A Moveable Feast to and why?

As I listened to this very enjoyable book, I came to think of The World of Yesterday, by Stefan Zweig, equally a memoir of a lost and ever longed for time in the early years of 20th century europe. But the memoirs of Hemingway do not contain as much nostalgia and emotion, and therefore has more invigourating and refreshing effects than Zweigs work, allthough I of course find T.W.O.Y beatiful as well.

What does James Naughton bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

The narrator's deep, calm and manly voice makes you believe that i could aactually be the author himself recalling his past café-frequenting days directly to you. I couldn't imagine a better voice to read Hemingway!

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

And it does make you want to travel, so badly! The book has stayed with me, and as i walk past the river Tiber, I can't help myself from thinking of Hemingway walking along the Seine with f. ex. F. Scott. Fitzgerald by his side.

Any additional comments?

What I learned from the book was with which seriousness Hemingway treated his writing, his work. He got up out of bed early in the morning and laboured like he would have done at his previous job as a journalist. To hear him talk about the methods by which his books were written, is reason enough to want to listen to this book. And it is far from the only one.