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The Ables audiobook cover art
  • The Ables

  • By: Jeremy Scott
  • Narrated by: Jeremy Scott
  • Length: 9 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,994
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,865
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,865

It wasn't the sex talk he expected. Phillip Sallinger's dad has told him he's a custodian - a guardian - and his genetically inherited power is telekinesis. He'll learn to move objects with his mind. Excited to begin superhero high school until he discovers he's assigned to a special-ed class for disabled empowered kids, he suddenly feels like an outsider.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • The reading was way too fast! I love this book.

  • By javion on 05-18-15

Impressions

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-28-17

I regularly watch the author's (Jeremy Scott) youtube channel CinemaSins. I figured I'd give this book a try. As far as I know this is his first and I think it was a admirable effort. He took a familiar premise that has been popularized ad nauseum in the last decade and gave it a fresh spin. He also avoided some of the pitfalls of bad writing he regularly calls out when doing reviews on CinemaSins. I thought it was a smart choice to have him narrate his own book, it emphasizes his brand of humor.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Brothers Karamazov [Naxos AudioBooks Edition]

  • By: Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Constance Garnett - translator
  • Narrated by: Constantine Gregory
  • Length: 37 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,673
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,489
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,490

Fyodor Dostoyevsky is a titanic figure among the world's great authors, and The Brothers Karamazov is often hailed as his finest novel. A masterpiece on many levels, it transcends the boundaries of a gripping murder mystery to become a moving account of the battle between love and hate, faith and despair, compassion and cruelty, good and evil.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Spiritual and Philosophical Tour-de-Force

  • By Rich on 02-27-16

The Brothers Karamazov - Winnie the Pooh version

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-25-16

I understand that Dostoevksy is considered among the best novelist of his time, but the plot is dragging. The narrator has a great voice but I can't help it when he has a certain tone that makes me think of the one who narrated Winnie the Pooh. Then I start imagining this book as the Russian version of that show where Pooh is making a stink over his existential crisis and bemoaning the philosophical and religious quandries of honey while roasting Piglet over a fire as Tigger drinks himself into a bottle of vodka and Rabbit counts how many AK-47 bullets he has left. And then I'm a chapter further into the book and don't remember a thing.

3 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • Kafka on the Shore

  • By: Haruki Murakami
  • Narrated by: Sean Barrett, Oliver Le Sueur
  • Length: 19 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,384
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,168
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,161

With Kafka on the Shore, Haruki Murakami gives us a novel every bit as ambitious and expansive as The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle, which has been acclaimed both here and around the world for its uncommon ambition and achievement, and whose still-growing popularity suggests that it will be read and admired for decades to come.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Love it!

  • By bleadof on 10-04-16

I'm finally done. Finally.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-06-16

Good narrator. Hard to recommend this book for a couple reasons.

On the low ground: The story drags. Conflict resolution is about the quality of vending machine food. Some parts lack any feeling, while others are overbearing with emotions. Complete randomness and poor plot devices.

On the middle ground: There are some taboo moral and social ideals present that are not commonly approached in writing. Some parts are left void of detail for you to draw your own conclusions.

On the high ground: Back stories are executed with skill. There are some great tie-ins to philosophy and art that strengthen the story. There is a scattering of moments that feel genuinely life-like.

Overall, the misgivings of the story cause it to constantly toe the line between introspection and exhaustion. This book may simply not be my type and could be yours, but I believe I've given an honest opinion of it here.

12 of 14 people found this review helpful