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Sandra Mizumoto Posey

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  • reviews
  • 23
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  • 4
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  • University of Nike

  • How Corporate Cash Bought American Higher Education
  • By: Joshua Hunt
  • Narrated by: Chris Andrew Ciulla
  • Length: 8 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 4
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 4
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 4

In the mid-1990s, facing severe cuts to its public funding, the University of Oregon - like so many colleges across the country - was desperate for cash. Luckily, the Oregon Ducks' 1995 Rose Bowl berth caught the attention of the school's wealthiest alumnus: Nike founder Phil Knight, who was seeking new marketing angles at the collegiate level. And so the University of Nike was born. But as journalist Joshua Hunt reveals in University of Nike, Oregon has paid dearly for the veneer of financial prosperity and athletic success that has come with this brand partnering.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A book about so much more than the title suggests

  • By Sandra Mizumoto Posey on 05-14-19

A book about so much more than the title suggests

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-14-19

Joshua Hunt’s book University of Nike is a must read. It is so much more than a book chronicling the rise of Nike as a company or how it then used both its seemingly infinite resources (and market recognition) to influence higher education at the University of Oregon. Further, it is also more than a book about how college sports have come to overshadow other aspects of the mission of public research universities throughout the U.S.. Stories of individuals at the center of the crisis who faced ethical choices with far-reaching impacts they possibly never anticipated are woven together with the larger historic arc of legislative and economic conditions that left public higher education vulnerable to exploitation, Hunt demonstrates in exhaustive detail the reason these institutions exist, how we as a society lost sight of their importance, and what they are now becoming. I initially hesitated to purchase this book because I have zero interest in collegiate athletics. I am glad I took the risk. While I was already suspicious of changes at universities brought on by the increasing importance of sports on college campuses, the story Hunt tells is much more comprehensive, fascinating and, sadly, much more dire than I expected. Whether you are a faculty member, a university administrator, a high school student deciding where to go to college, or even a booster for your alma mater’s football team, you will find information here that will surprise you. For legislators and tax payers (i.e., pretty much everyone), this should be required reading.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Take the Leap

  • Change Your Career, Change Your Life
  • By: Sara Bliss
  • Narrated by: Will Blagrove, Ramón De Ocampo, Janina Edwards, and others
  • Length: 6 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 16

Sara Bliss (yes, that’s her real name) tracked down more than 65 people who transformed their lives to learn how they did it so you can, too. Take the Leap is packed with inspiring profiles, quotes, and other pieces of creative advice from game changers, rule breakers, and side hustlers, including successful entrepreneurs like Barbara Corcoran, Bobbi Brown, writer turned actress (at 40) Jill Kargman, Black Crowes drummer turned sports radio host Steve Gorman, writer Simon Doonan, and NFL player turned artist/activist Aaron Maybin, and many more. 

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Getting Unstuck

  • By Sandra Mizumoto Posey on 05-09-19

Getting Unstuck

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-09-19

Instead of a boring step-by-step plan for switching careers, author Sara Bliss shares real-life stories of people who extricated themselves from a variety of professions they didn't enjoy to pursue others closer their hearts. I was drawn to this book because I'm considering career change myself but I struggle with the prospect the of leaving an established career -- one that financially supports both myself and my daughter -- only to start all over again. These stories provided a much needed shot in the arm to keep going. Sometimes just hearing that something can actually can be done is exactly what's needed to propel you forward. The profiles in the book, however, are inconsistent. There were some I didn't think belonged in the book at all because some career changes seemed more like subtle adjustments: a young adult in an entry level position who then moved to a higher position in the same industry. Others left high-paying positions (that no doubt allowed them to save a good deal of money) and were easily able to take the time off they needed to ponder their lives, to pursue additional training, or bankroll a new venture. While It's always nice to see people finally doing what they love no matter what strata of society they come from, to those of us with less in the way of financial safety nets, these stories can actually hinder us from believing we can "take the leap." Nonetheless, though I personally couldn't relate to the all of the examples, I do want to reiterate that there were enough stories I *could* relate to that made listening to the book more than worthwhile. I suspect most people will find at least a few anecdotes or tips they will find useful. Whether we start with money or not, we could all use reminders now and again that our dreams are possible. Let's hope so anyway.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Women's Work

  • A Reckoning with Work and Home
  • By: Megan K. Stack
  • Narrated by: Allyson Ryan
  • Length: 12 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 15
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 15
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 15

A National Book Award finalist's unforgettable account of raising her children abroad with the help of Chinese and Indian women who are also working mothers. 

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Almost insightful...but not quite

  • By Sandra Mizumoto Posey on 05-08-19

Almost insightful...but not quite

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-08-19

After becoming a mother, National Book Award finalist Megan K. Stack found challenges her experience as a foreign correspondent in Afghanistan hadn't prepared her for. As a stay-at-home mom in Beijing, her sanity and sense of self eroded amidst the chaos of caring for her infant son. Like many expatriates, Stack hired local domestic workers to help, an arrangement that allowed her to be both a mother and a writer. Later in Delhi, she again recruited local women, some of whom had to leave their own children behind in order to care for hers. Initially Stack tried "not to think about how making things nicer for one person always seemed to make things worse for somebody else," but the disparities were difficult to ignore. Turning her gaze toward the problem instead of averting her eyes, she begins to interview women who had worked for her, even returning to China to find women who had worked for her in the past. Unfortunately, these conversations come late in the book and Stack's reflections fall just short of true insight or action. She presents the problem of the structural inequity but offers no solutions: When it is once again time for her family to relocate, Stack considers inviting her long-time servant, by then old and infirm, to come along but knew she would never actually make the offer. "We’ll simply leave," she acknowledged, "and that will be the end.” For her perhaps, but for these women and those like them probably not.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Evil Eye

  • By: Madhuri Shekar
  • Narrated by: Nick Choksi, Harsh Nayaar, Annapurna Sriram, and others
  • Length: 1 hr and 38 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14,941
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13,894
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13,815

Pallavi is an aspiring writer living in California. Her mother, Usha, is thousands of miles away in Delhi - and obsessed with finding her daughter a husband. In Madhuri Shekar’s ingenious Evil Eye, hilarious back-and-forth via phone and social media takes a shocking, supernatural twist when Pallavi meets the perfect man - leading to a climactic showdown that will leave listeners on the edges of their seats.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Does anyone remember party lines?

  • By Mary V. on 05-03-19

This is an audio book, but still a page-turner

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-08-19

Told entirely through a series of phone calls and voicemail messages, Evil Eye begins as a lightly comic family story: Born in India but raised in the U.S. 29-year-old Pahlavi negotiates the cultural divide between she and her mother Usha. Living once again in India, Usha doggedly and repeatedly arranges dates with suitable gentlemen for an exasperated Pahlavi. Had this story remained centered on loving conflicts such as this one that will feel familiar to many Americans with immigrant parents, I still would have given it a good review because author Madhuri Shekar captures their differences in a way that is both funny and authentic, never belittling the perspective of either character. Shekar, however, has something else in mind for listeners as she pivots the story in a surprising direction that I will not reveal here. Suffice to say, Shekar deftly packages a wry but important reminder that we should always be careful when characterizing the beliefs of immigrants as mere superstition. A delightful and gripping tale.

17 of 20 people found this review helpful