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sarah

san francisco, CA, United States
  • 17
  • reviews
  • 49
  • helpful votes
  • 32
  • ratings
  • The Handmaid's Tale

  • By: Margaret Atwood
  • Narrated by: Claire Danes
  • Length: 11 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 31,776
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 28,892
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 28,889

Offred is a Handmaid in the Republic of Gilead, serving in the household of the enigmatic Commander and his bitter wife. She may go out once a day to markets whose signs are now pictures because women are not allowed to read. She must pray that the Commander makes her pregnant, for in a time of declining birthrates her value lies in her fertility, and failure means exile to the dangerously polluted Colonies. Offred can remember a time when she lived with her husband and daughter and had a job, before she lost even her own name....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • My Top Pick for 2012

  • By Em on 11-30-12

Typical Atwood Brilliance and a great performance

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-06-16

Danes does a great read, and from reading reviews on goodreads, the spoken performance might be easier to understand than the book, but saying would give some of the plot away so I won't. The story is excellent, thought written about a terrible dystopian world (that is downright eerie in its prescience, when you realize it was written in '84) so sometimes the story feels terrible. The ending is classic Atwood-- brilliant and unexpected, leaving the reader with lots to consider.

  • Awakenings

  • By: Oliver Sacks
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Davis, Oliver Sacks
  • Length: 13 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 369
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 337
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 331

Awakenings - which inspired the major motion picture - is the remarkable story of a group of patients who contracted sleeping sickness during the great epidemic just after World War I. Frozen for decades in a trance-like state, these men and women were given up as hopeless until 1969, when Dr. Oliver Sacks gave them the then-new drug L-DOPA, which had an astonishing, explosive, "awakening" effect. Dr. Sacks recounts the moving case histories of his patients, their lives, and their extraordinary transformations.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Absolute classic!

  • By Douglas on 09-01-12

Wasn't my favorite, but an important and interesting event

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-30-16

The events, the story of what happened with these patients is amazing, but this is not Sachs best writing. It is often stiff and it isn't until he quits with the character studies, really the post script 10 years later, that his warmth comes through.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Tales of the City

  • Tales of the City, Book 1
  • By: Armistead Maupin
  • Narrated by: Frances McDormand
  • Length: 7 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,058
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 954
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 955

For more than three decades Armistead Maupin's Tales of the City has blazed its own trail through popular culture...from a groundbreaking newspaper serial, to a classic novel, to a television event that entranced millions around the world. The first of six novels about the denizens of the mythic apartment house at 28 Barbary Lane, Tales of the City is both a sparkling comedy of manners and an indelible portrait of an era that changed forever the way we live.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Sparkling, Witty and Touching!

  • By Nancy J on 01-19-14

An easy and pleasant read

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-08-16

A great and easy read, the little stories of the tenants of 28 Barbary lane are light, funny, and indicative of the strange and luscious world of the Bay Area.

  • The Neurobiology of 'We'

  • How Relationships, the Mind, and the Brain Interact to Shape Who We Are
  • By: Daniel J. Siegel
  • Narrated by: Daniel J. Siegel
  • Length: 8 hrs and 9 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 667
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 587
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 577

If you think your brain and mind are one, think again. According to the interpersonal neurobioligy pioneer Daniel J. Siegel, the mind actually emerges out of the interaction between your brain and relationships. Now, with The Neurobiology of "We", Dr. Siegel invites you on a journey to discover this revolutionary new model of human development - one that can positively transform trauma, move you from stress to calm and equanimity, and promote well-being for you, your family, or even your community.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • among the best

  • By a human being on 01-19-15

Something is wrong with audio

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-05-16

I had to play it at 1.25 speed as 1x sounded "off". Once I got that fixed, the performance and reading were fantastic. As a psychotherapist- this was all relevant and applicable to my life and practice. The writing is great and ideas are clearly presented. This is a great place to start with Dr. Siegel's work.

  • The Road to Character

  • By: David Brooks
  • Narrated by: Arthur Morey, David Brooks
  • Length: 12 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,252
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,958
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,942

With the wisdom, humor, curiosity, and sharp insights that have brought millions of readers to his New York Times column and his previous best sellers, David Brooks has consistently illuminated our daily lives in surprising and original ways. In The Social Animal, he explored the neuroscience of human connection and how we can flourish together. Now, in The Road to Character, he focuses on the deeper values that should inform our lives.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Rich, textured stories

  • By Amazon Customer on 05-25-15

Great book- first and last chapters were best

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-14-15

I really liked it and the reading is excellent. I wish Brooks would have explained how he chose the people he did to write about. I am deeply disappointed he seemed to have totally missed the role that spirituality played in so many of their lives.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Stone Mattress

  • Nine Tales
  • By: Margaret Atwood
  • Narrated by: Margaret Atwood, Rob Delaney, Mark Bramhall
  • Length: 10 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 395
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 340
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 345

A collection of highly imaginative short pieces that speak to our times with deadly accuracy. Vintage Atwood creativity, intelligence, and humor: think Alias Grace. Margaret Atwood turns to short fiction for the first time since her 2006 collection, Moral Disorder, with nine tales of acute psychological insight and turbulent relationships bringing to mind her award-winning 1996 novel, Alias Grace.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Includes 3 great short stories

  • By Vered on 02-12-15

Always a pleasure and great performances

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-13-15

If you like Atwood, these stories are pretty classic. She plays with perspective in the first few stories, reminding me of Oryx and Crake. The stories span genres and are and points of view. The performers are the same as Oryx and Crake, with Atwood reading some of the stories, expertly.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

Alias Grace audiobook cover art
  • Alias Grace

  • By: Margaret Atwood
  • Narrated by: Elizabeth McGovern
  • Length: 6 hrs
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 546
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 334
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 333

In the astonishing work by the author of the best sellers The Robber Bride and The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood takes listeners back in time and into the life and mind of one of the most enigmatic and notorious women of the 19th century.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Incredible!

  • By Michelle on 04-02-03

Great reading and great story

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-07-15

There are some elements that reminded me if Oryx and Crake- Atwood's ability to alter and pronounce perspective such a joy. She leaves some elements of plot unanswered but if you are a fan, this is a great story with a fantastic reader.

White Noise audiobook cover art
  • White Noise

  • By: Don DeLillo
  • Narrated by: Michael Prichard
  • Length: 12 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 309
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 204
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 212

Jack Gladney teaches Hitler studies at a liberal arts college in Middle America where his colleagues include New York expatriates who want to immerse themselves in "American magic and dread". Jack and his fourth wife, Babette, bound by love, fear of death, and four ultramodern offspring, navigate the usual rocky passages of family life to the background babble of brand-name consumerism. Then a lethal black cloud floats over their lives, an airborne "toxic event", an industrial accident.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • HORRIBLE performance.

  • By Laurie Van Horn on 04-27-05

Maybe my favorite book of all time

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-05-15

Wow- if you like the existential then you can't help but love this. I was totally blown away. Some fantastic lines and the performance is very good.

  • Oryx and Crake

  • By: Margaret Atwood
  • Narrated by: Campbell Scott
  • Length: 10 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,948
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,702
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,732

The narrator of Atwood's riveting novel calls himself Snowman. When the story opens, he is sleeping in a tree, wearing an old bedsheet, mourning the loss of his beloved Oryx and his best friend Crake, and slowly starving to death. He searches for supplies in a wasteland where insects proliferate and pigoons and wolvogs ravage the pleeblands, where ordinary people once lived, and the Compounds that sheltered the extraordinary. 

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Very Scary Stuff

  • By Doug on 07-21-03

Intriguing story, slowly told

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-21-15

The novel unravels slowly. Atwood uses the novel to create a universe.
Though I am not particularly invested in any of the characters, I'm intrigued enough to see where she goes. Narration is great.

  • The Believing Brain

  • From Ghosts and Gods to Politics and Conspiracies - How We Construct Beliefs and Reinforce Them as Truths
  • By: Michael Shermer
  • Narrated by: Michael Shermer
  • Length: 13 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,129
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 874
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 867

In this, his magnum opus, the world’s best known skeptic and critical thinker Dr. Michael Shermer—founding publisher of Skeptic magazine and perennial monthly columnist (“Skeptic”) for Scientific American—presents his comprehensive theory on how beliefs are born, formed, nourished, reinforced, challenged, changed, and extinguished.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Great material. Not-so-great narration.

  • By Leigh Bartley on 06-17-11

agree with other reviewer's complaints-terrible

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-11-11

I have been on a cog-sci kick for a few months now and as I am in a grad program that incorporates spirituality and psychology, I was interested in hearing specifically some of the science and open to how belief mechanisms and superstitions work.

This. was. terrible.

Shermer is not just a skeptic, he is someone with a grudge against anyone that believes anything except the cold, hard facts. I have imagined him punching any child still dumb enough to believe in the tooth fairy or scornfully mocking and spitting on a child still hoping that Santa might come in the night. I mean, this guy doesn't just not believe, he wants to make an ass out of anyone who is stupid enough to have faith in anything.

Sadly, the book is little more than a diatribe about how smart and rational he is and how shockingly stupid and naive everyone else is--- even nobel laureates are nincompoops if they hold the horrifically moronic delusion that God exists! I mean, what idiocy! The vitriol becomes tired and boring and eventually I was listening at 3x speed and then I just gave up.

If you're looking for a good science book, I recommend The Brain that Changes Itself.

1 of 6 people found this review helpful