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Adam

IRVING, TX, United States
  • 31
  • reviews
  • 111
  • helpful votes
  • 32
  • ratings
  • Morgan: American Financier

  • By: Jean Strouse
  • Narrated by: Nelson Runger
  • Length: 43 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 63
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 52
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 54

In Morgan, noted biographer Jean Strouse creates the first complete portrait of a man who defined American commerce and banking. Contemporaries described J. Pierpoint Morgan as “the financial Moses of the New World.” She shows J.Pierpoint Morgan in the full context of his childhood and health, travels and tastes, personal affairs and business relationships. And through Nelson Runger’s thoughtful narration, this accessible biography becomes a fascinating audio production.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Surprisingly accessible, make the man human

  • By Robert W. Pike on 08-18-13

ok book

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-04-12

I have bought many books and I have to admit that this is one of the few that I could have done without. There was some valuable information, but much of it was a combination of information that most with a basic understanding of history already know, and detail that few would find relevant. Unfortunately much of the book consisted of mind numbing detail that I really didn't care for. The length could have been reduced by 80% and still have been too much.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Edison

  • A Life of Invention
  • By: Paul Israel
  • Narrated by: Raymond Todd
  • Length: 22 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars 43
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 18
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 18

Armed with unprecedented access to Edison's workshop diaries, notebooks, and letters, Israel brings fresh insights into how the inventor's creative mind worked. For the first time, much attention is devoted to his early family life in Ohio and Michigan, where the young Edison honed his entrepreneurial sense and eye for innovation as a newsstand owner and editor of a weekly newspaper. These experiences underscore the inventor's later successes with new resonance and pathos.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Worst narration ever

  • By Michael on 10-16-07

ok book

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-04-12

I have bought many books and I have to admit that this is one of the few that I could have done without. There was some valuable information, but much of it was a combination of information that most with a basic understanding of history already know, and detail that few would find relevant. Unfortunately much of the book consisted of detail that I really didn't care for.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Last Call

  • The Rise and Fall of Prohibition
  • By: Daniel Okrent
  • Narrated by: Richard Poe
  • Length: 17 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 270
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 239
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 242

A brilliant, authoritative, and fascinating history of America’s most puzzling era, the years 1920 to 1933, when the U.S. Constitution was amended to restrict one of America’s favorite pastimes: drinking alcoholic beverages. Okrent reveals how Prohibition marked a confluence of diverse forces, including the growing political power of the women’s suffrage movement and the fear of small-town, native-stock Protestants that they were losing control of their country to the immigrants of the large cities.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Very Thorough Historical Review

  • By Pierre on 11-12-12

ok book

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-04-12

I have bought many books and I have to admit that this is one of the few that I could have done without. There was some valuable information, but much of it was a combination of information that most with a basic understanding of history already know, and detail that few would find relevant.

2 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • The Sociopath Next Door

  • By: Martha Stout
  • Narrated by: Shelly Frasier
  • Length: 7 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 6,183
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,796
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 4,787

We are accustomed to think of sociopaths as violent criminals, but in The Sociopath Next Door, Harvard psychologist Martha Stout reveals that a shocking 4 percent of ordinary people, one in 25, has an often undetected mental disorder, the chief symptom of which is that that person possesses no conscience. He or she has no ability whatsoever to feel shame, guilt, or remorse. One in 25 everyday Americans, therefore, is secretly a sociopath.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Gripping! A fascinating/scary look at human nature

  • By ClosetGeek on 01-08-10

Very good

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-07-12

I didn't expect such a short book to be so informative, but it was. This has to be one of my favorite books, since its discussion of sociopaths also explains the nature of human emotion in everyone else. It doesn't just describe this from the standpoint of psychology and neurobiology but even brain structure. It seems that most psychology/sociology books describe an author's own niche view that often isn't widely held, and so these books are usually not that good. This book was an exception. I can't really think of any complaints about it, other than that I wish it was longer.

  • The Outline of History

  • Being a Plain History of Life and Mankind
  • By: H. G. Wells
  • Narrated by: Bernard Mayes
  • Length: 44 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 53
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 39
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 42

Having coined the phrase "the war that will end war," H. G. Wells was disillusioned by the World War I peace settlement. Convinced that humanity needed to awaken to the instability of the world order and remember lessons from the past, the author of science-fiction classics set out to write about history. Wells hoped to remind mankind of its common past, provide it with a basis for international patriotism, and guide it to renounce war.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Good book

  • By Adam on 03-07-12

Good book

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-07-12

I thought that this book was very good and I highly recommend it. It is a very thick read, and even though I know a lot about world history, this book still took a while to digest. Unlike most books that cover world history, this book doesn't have a Euro-centric bias (at least not until about the 17th century). Another thing I liked about the book is that it offers a window into the (author's) world of the early 1920s, since you can often discern the pure history from the lens through which the author tells it (such as his tendency to see proto-communistic tendencies in various past events). My only complaint (and the only thing that prevents me from giving the book five stars) is that the author's own ideological biases become apparent, especially near the end of the book. I would also warn other readers that western understanding of Indian and Chinese history has come a long way since this book was written, and so its discussion of Indian and Chinese history is a bit dated. Overall though, the book was very good.

10 of 10 people found this review helpful

  • American Caesar

  • Douglas MacArthur 1880-1964
  • By: William Manchester
  • Narrated by: Grover Gardner
  • Length: 31 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 752
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 576
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 574

Virtually all Americans above a certain age hold strong opinions about Douglas MacArthur. They either worship him or despise him. Now, in this superb book, one of our most outstanding writers, after a meticulous three-year examination of the record, presents his startling insights about the man. The narrative is gripping, because the general's life was fascinating. It is moving, because he was a man of vision. It ends, finally, in tragedy, because his character, though majestic, was tragically flawed.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • An Honest Portrayal of a Flawed Hero

  • By Wolfpacker on 05-27-12

Good book

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-07-12

Overall this was a very good book and I highly recommend it. The discussion of MacArthur's father provides the core of a side discussion on the generation of military leaders that preceded MacArthur, and I thought that this was especially valuable. I also thought this book did a good job of de-mythologizing MacArthur and showing how he was truly perceived in his own day, which was different than how we perceive him today. In addition, the book does a good job of explaining an important sub-theater of WW2 and the Korean War.

  • Vietnam

  • A History
  • By: Stanley Karnow
  • Narrated by: Edward Holland
  • Length: 27 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 526
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 390
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 388

In this comprehensive history, Stanley Karnow demystifies the tragic ordeal of America's war in Vietnam. The book's central theme is that America's leaders, prompted as much by domestic politics as by global ambitions, carried the United States into Southeast Asia with little regard for the realities of the region. Karnow elucidates the decision-making process in Washington and Asia and recounts the political and military events that occurred after the Americans arrived in Vietnam.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • As stunning as it was engaging

  • By David Ewing on 08-06-07

Good book

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-07-12

Overall the book was good. I especially liked the earlier part of the book that discussed the history of the region. I would have liked the book to have included more on the military (tactical and strategic) component and less on the diplomatic component, though this might be asking too much from a book on the Vietnam War. I definitely recommend this, as it may be one of the best books on the Vietnam War.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • A. Lincoln

  • A Biography
  • By: Ronald C. White Jr.
  • Narrated by: Bill Weideman
  • Length: 27 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 587
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 410
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 410

In this important new biography, Ronald C. White, Jr. offers a fresh and fascinating definition of Lincoln as a man of integrity - what today's commentators are calling "authenticity" - whose internal moral compass is the key to understanding his life. Through meticulous research, utilizing recently discovered Lincoln letters, legal papers, and photographs, White depicts Lincoln as a person of intellectual curiosity, comfortable with ambiguity, and capable of changing his mind.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Insight into Lincoln

  • By Julieann on 02-17-10

Very good

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-17-12

This is a very good and informative book. Even though I already knew a lot about Lincoln and the Civil War, I still learned a lot from this book. One thing in particular I liked was the amount of time the author devoted to his life before his presidency. Often books on important people focus too much attention on the events you already know, which made them so famous. These often minimize their life before that important event, which means that you won't be able to learn what really made them tick. This book doesn't do that, nor does it focus too much on the battle history of the Civil War. On the Civil War, it focuses (like it should) on Lincoln's role, and describes how his views changed and what led up to important decisions like his issuing of the Emancipation Proclamation. I highly recommend this book.

8 of 9 people found this review helpful

  • John Adams

  • By: David McCullough
  • Narrated by: Nelson Runger
  • Length: 30 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,631
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,244
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,255

McCullough's John Adams has the sweep and vitality of a great novel. This is history on a grand scale, an audiobook about politics, war, and social issues, but also about human nature, love, religious faith, virtue, ambition, friendship, and betrayal, and the far-reaching consequences of noble ideas. Above all, it is an enthralling, often surprising story of one of the most important and fascinating Americans who ever lived.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • An outstanding biography

  • By Davis on 07-10-06

Very good

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-17-12

This book is well written and tells you a lot about the Adamses in general, and John in particular. John and Abigail (and John Quincy for that matter) left behind so many letters and writings that scholars still haven't been able to go through them all. This book also shines a light on daily life in their day, which we can only see because the Adamses left behind so many writings. I highly recommend this book.

2 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • First Family: Abigail & John Adams

  • By: Joseph J. Ellis
  • Narrated by: Kimberly Farr
  • Length: 11 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 145
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 102
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 99

John and Abigail Adams left an indelible and remarkably preserved portrait of their lives together in their personal correspondence: both Adamses were prolific letter writers (although John conceded that Abigail was clearly the more gifted of the two). Joseph J. Ellis distills this unprecedented and unsurpassed record to give us an account both intimate and panoramic; part biography, part political history, and part love story.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • "Real History"

  • By leslie on 11-15-10

Very good

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-17-12

I have read so much on John Adams that I didn't think this book would contain much information that I didn't already know, but it does. It is well written and tells you a lot about the Adamses in general, and their marriage in particular. John and Abigail (and John Quincy for that matter) left behind so many letters and writings that scholars still haven't been able to go through them all. Because of this, there is so much information about them that one or two books about them doesn't tell you even many of the basics. This book also shines a light on daily life in their day, which we can only see because the Adamses left behind so many writings. I highly recommend this book, along with the John Adams biography by David McCullough, the Abigail biography by Woody Holton, and the John Quincy biography by Paul Nagel. I have gone through all of these and they all contained a lot of information that I hadn't known before.

9 of 9 people found this review helpful