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Kate Reynolds

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  • Babylon's Ashes

  • The Expanse, Book 6
  • By: James S. A. Corey
  • Narrated by: Jefferson Mays
  • Length: 19 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,175
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 7,541
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,513

The Free Navy - a violent group of Belters in black-market military ships - has crippled the Earth and begun a campaign of piracy and violence among the outer planets. The colony ships heading for the thousand new worlds on the far side of the alien ring gates are easy prey, and no single navy remains strong enough to protect them. James Holden and his crew know the strengths and weaknesses of this new force better than anyone.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • lots of filler

  • By Jesse Stevens II on 12-21-16

Corey's books are great entertainment

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-12-16

If you could sum up Babylon's Ashes in three words, what would they be?

Raymond Chandler is to crime fiction what Corey is to Space Operas. He defines the genre. Corey's books are for adults and his novels cannot be mistaken for those within a "young adult, genre. His space operas are really operas: vast, multi-faceted stories that explore the human condition, issues of character, and deep philosophic ideas--yet within the genre of entertainment. I enjoy his books enormously.

Who was your favorite character and why?

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What does Jefferson Mays bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

Jeffereson Mays is very easy to listen to. In the narration he sort of disappears and does not detract from the flow of the story yet manages to bring everything to life.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

.

Any additional comments?

.

0 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Great Dissent

  • How Oliver Wendell Holmes Changed His Mind and Changed the History of Free Speech in America
  • By: Thomas Healy
  • Narrated by: Danny Campbell
  • Length: 10 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 199
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 175
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 178

Free speech as we know it comes less from the First Amendment than from a most unexpected source: Supreme Court justice Oliver Wendell Holmes. A lifelong skeptic, he disdained all individual rights, including the right to express one's political views. But in 1919, it was Holmes who wrote a dissenting opinion that would become the canonical affirmation of free speech in the United States.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • How a 78 year old man can learn & change his mind

  • By Jean on 09-23-13

Read after "They Metephysical Club."

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-30-15

What did you love best about The Great Dissent?

Healy writes an absorbing account in the history of ideas surrounding free speech, much of it a surprise to me. I had wrongly assumed that free speech was always what I knew it to be. He describes an era as well and fleshes out the character of O. W. Holmes with great insight.

What other book might you compare The Great Dissent to and why?

The Metephysical Club. Both books give biographies of Holmes but in different times of his life.

Have you listened to any of Danny Campbell’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

The narration made the book easy to follow without any distracting contrivance on the part of the narrator. He made difficult material clear.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

Healy's deep knowledge of his subject lent a great sympathy for the personalities surrounding Holmes who sacrificed much to the cause of free speech.

Any additional comments?

Informative and absorbing

0 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Barbarian Days

  • A Surfing Life
  • By: William Finnegan
  • Narrated by: William Finnegan
  • Length: 18 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,625
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,412
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,402

Pulitzer Prize, Biography, 2016. Barbarian Days is William Finnegan's memoir of an obsession, a complex enchantment. Surfing only looks like a sport. To initiates it is something else entirely: a beautiful addiction, a demanding course of study, a morally dangerous pastime, a way of life.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • An Amazing Performance by the Author

  • By Laura - Audible on 02-01-16

Review from a non-surfer

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-28-15

I am sure that this book can be enjoyed for as many reasons as there are people who read it because it has sufficient depth to offer personal insights and inspiration to anyone. I had just finished the Faustian tale that is the recent biography of Elon Musk, and Finnegan's book was balm to the anxiety I felt from Vance's book. I am grateful to Finnegan, for his life well lived, for the courage, authenticity, and generosity reflected within it, and for his entertaining narrative.

7 of 9 people found this review helpful

  • American Lion

  • Andrew Jackson in the White House
  • By: Jon Meacham
  • Narrated by: Richard McGonagle
  • Length: 17 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 854
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 678
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 670

Beloved and hated, venerated and reviled, Andrew Jackson was an orphan who fought his way to the pinnacle of power, bending the nation to his will in the cause of democracy. Jackson's election in 1828 ushered in a new and lasting era in which the people, not distant elites, were the guiding force in American politics. Democracy made its stand in the Jackson years, and he gave voice to the hopes and the fears of a restless, changing nation facing challenging times at home and threats abroad.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Unlikable Old Hickory

  • By John M on 01-05-09

An informed portrait

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-04-09

I've read reviews that were not as favorable to this book as I am. Different expectations may account for the discrepancies of opinion. I found the book highly entertaining. To dismiss the social battles of Washington in those years as petty and not central to the more interesting events of the day shows a more superficial understanding of what is meaningful in history. The social battles were but the surface of shifting social custom and much deeper human events. Meacham intended a balanced and highly personal portrait of Jackson. His account accomplishes this, showing the paradoxes of Jackson's character and that of the character of the country of that time. It is a close personal look at a man that manages to be great in spite of serious flaws, and so identified with the country at the time that after reading it, one again must consider what it means to be an American. I really enjoyed this book.

13 of 15 people found this review helpful