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Oliver Nielsen

  • 101
  • reviews
  • 1,371
  • helpful votes
  • 423
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  • Entrepreneurial You

  • Monetize Your Expertise, Create Multiple Income Streams, and Thrive
  • By: Dorie Clark
  • Narrated by: Dorie Clark
  • Length: 5 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 129
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 118
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 120

What does it take to create the career you want? It's no secret that the world of work has changed, and we're shifting toward an ever more entrepreneurial, self-reliant, work-from-wherever-you-are economy. That can be a liberating force. But there's a major obstacle professionals face when they contemplate taking the leap: how to actually make money doing what they love. You may have incredible talent and novel ideas, but figuring out how to get started, building your reputation in a new realm, and bringing in a steady flow of new clients can be a daunting prospect.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • If you’re looking for something as practical as it is inspirational start here

  • By Eric on 11-26-17

Alternative title: Ways to Earn Money Online

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-12-18

A more precise title for this book would be "Ways to Earn Money Online". In it, Dorie lists the various ways you can make money online (affiliate programs, online courses, masterminds, podcasting, etc).

That's all helpful, but mostly to newbies who haven't yet dipped their toes in the online marketing pool. Had it been titled with my alternative title instead, it would perhaps sell less? Books on "ways to make money online" are everywhere.

I had hoped for more of a HOW to create multiple income streams, as in: practical advice, and a larger portion of "here's what I have learned over the years" wisdom.

There is *some* of that, but not enough to satisfy what I'd hoped to find.

Still, it's a solid book, taken for what it is.

What I did find valuable, is that Dorie Clark cites concrete numbers for how much various online marketers have made and spend on advertising, download numbers for various podcasters, how many episode-downloads advertisers expect before they're interested in sponsoring your show, etc, giving the book realistic, concrete perspectives.

I also appreciated her honest assessments of mistakes she'd done in the past, product creation and marketing wise. I could certainly relate to the case where a case study had pre-sold an online course, launched it, sold one membership, and due to his integrity felt obliged to create a weekly video for one member, month after month. That's the hard-earned wisdom I wish more authors would write about. There's already so much "do this, do that, and voila: you'll be rich" content available. All it does, it lead people into the false idea that their next online undertaking is a piece of cake and bound to be successful. Knowing the hardships you'll encounter beforehand, is what WILL increase your chances of success.

That's why elite police units like SWAT and and special operations forces like the Navy SEALs are so good at what they do:
- they train with the *expectation* that things will get REALLY tough (the sh*t will always hit the fan),
- that every mission will seem *almost* impossible to accomplish,
- that everything that *can* go wrong *will* go wrong – and that it's rarely the things you expect to go wrong. So train to be adaptable: don't choke when it happens – adapt, reorientate, reprioritize and act on the new scenario with as little interruption as possible.

Dorie Clark's book does go some distance towards that mindset – but could go a lot further.

9 of 9 people found this review helpful

  • Disruptive Marketing

  • What Growth Hackers, Data Punks, and Other Hybrid Thinkers Can Teach Us About Navigating the New Normal
  • By: Geoffrey Colon
  • Narrated by: Geoffrey Colon
  • Length: 6 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 70
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 65
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 66

Now that 75 percent of screen time is spent on connected devices, digital strategies have moved front and center of most marketing plans. But what if that's not enough? What if most people ignore company messages? What if consumer engagement never goes further than the "like" button? A sobering reality is hitting marketers. Technology hasn't just reshaped mass media, it's altering behavior as well. And getting through to customers will take some radical rethinking.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Needed. Valuable. Welcome contribution.

  • By Oliver Nielsen on 04-26-17

Needed. Valuable. Welcome contribution.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-26-17

For some reason, I had a hard time "getting it" the first time I listened to it. I kept pressing the rewind button on my iPhone, to hear paragraphs again.

Not because the book is unclear, but perhaps because it's profound. At least as profound as a book about marketing can be:)

After having finished it, I looked forward to relistening.

I did so, a few weeks later.

And after that second relisten, which happened maybe two months ago now: I feel like relistening for the third time.

I guess it's a marketing mind-bender, to me, this book:)

The narration is good too. When I give five stars for narration, it's because the narrator adds something special to the experience. I think he does so in this instance. Good job.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Downward Dog

  • A Novel
  • By: Edward Vilga
  • Narrated by: J. Paul Guimont
  • Length: 11 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 27
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 25
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 24

Downward Dog tells the tale of a handsome Bad Boy who becomes a yoga instructor while trying to redeem his womanizing ways and win the forgiveness of the only woman he’s ever really loved. Down on his luck, thanks to a failed nightlife venture, our hero’s stuck with massive debt and broken dreams. His only safe haven is the yoga world, and when his well-connected best buddy launches his yoga career among New York City's elite, our working-class hero becomes a guru to society’s top one percent, a wolf let loose amongst a flock of comely sheep.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Chick lit for guys

  • By Alison on 04-20-14

An auditory page-turner... or chapter-turner?

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-26-17

I seldom listen to fiction. This one caught my attention and I'm glad it did. It's one of those books you can't put down.

It's funny too:)

  • American Commander

  • Serving a Country Worth Fighting for and Training the Brave Soldiers Who Lead the Way
  • By: Ryan Zinke
  • Narrated by: Daniel Butler
  • Length: 10 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 223
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 202
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 205

As a 23-year veteran of the United States Navy SEAL Teams, Ryan Zinke received two Bronze Stars for battle valor and eventually rose to command the elite members of SEAL Team Six. During his career Zinke trained and commanded many of the men who would one day run the covert operations to hunt down Osama bin Laden and save Captain Phillips ( Maersk Alabama). He also served as mentor to now famous SEALs Marcus Luttrell ( Lone Survivor) and Chris Kyle ( American Sniper).

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Fascinating, but with too many political rants.

  • By BigE on 07-05-17

Part memoir, part political manifesto

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-06-17

A reviewer on Amazon wrote that the book details Ryan's specific decision-making / problem-solving approach. I heard it mentioned shortly in the book, but there wasn't much of an explanation of it, let alone apply it.

Apart from that, the book was enjoyable. I personally agree with at least 95% of what Ryan stands for, so the political content didn't rub me the wrong way at all.

There was less political content than I expected from the book's description. Most of it is a memoir of his life, and the SEAL stories are told in that manner – i.e. as recollections from the past – anecdotes if you will. That means there's little action to be found here. It's not Extreme Ownership by Jocko & Babin by any stretch of the imagination.

It reminds me of Seal Team Six – Memoirs of an Elite Navy SEAL Sniper, by Howard E. Wasdin. Ryan's book is okay, but not as enjoyable as Wasdin's. The latter is more emotional – made me shed a few tears. Ryan's book is more on the dry side, and I found myself wanting to skip the parts about his childhood, which all seemed quite trivial.

He also keeps his cards close to his chest – there are no secrets revealed here. At all. I know most of his missions were likely classified, but still: I wanted more than I got.

Oh, there's another (similar) book I enjoyed more than this one. It's Unbreakable, by Thom Shea. Part love story, part memoir – but also lots of battle-action and life lessons.

All that said: Ryan's book is okay, too;)

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Every Day, Holy Day

  • 365 Days of Teachings and Practices from the Jewish Tradition of Mussar
  • By: Alan Morinis, Rabbi Micha Berger
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Davis
  • Length: 3 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 39
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 35
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 34

"You shall be holy," teaches the Bible. The masters of the Jewish Mussar tradition have crafted a roadmap to help people approach that lofty goal. Mussar is a system of introspective practices that can help you identify and break through the obstacles to your inherent holiness, using methods that are easy to integrate into daily life. Every Day, Holy Day is an essential companion for anyone who wants to experience the life-changing gifts of Mussar.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Least Expensive yet MOST Impactful Book Ever

  • By Victor Mizrahi on 06-06-18

Good content – lousy narrator

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-30-17

I like Jonathan Davis' (the narrator) voice. Problem is, he doesn't separate each day by saying f.e. "Monday: ..." and "Tuesday..." or "Day 14..." and "Day 15..."

Since this is a book intended to be read and practiced, bit by bit, day by day, it is dreadful to listen to. The narrator seems to be reading the same stuff over and over, because the weekly quote is repeated for each day, same is the title, and so on. And it's just impossible to pause the audio at the right spot for you to continue again tomorrow. And if you rewind f.e. 20 seconds, you'll be in doubt as to which day you're listening to.

Long story short: I'd rather get the printed version.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Sprint

  • How to Solve Big Problems and Test New Ideas in Just Five Days
  • By: Jake Knapp, John Zeratsky, Braden Kowitz
  • Narrated by: Dan Bittner
  • Length: 6 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,071
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 924
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 919

The companies that Google Ventures invest in face big questions every day: Where's the most important place to focus your effort, and how do you start? What will your ideas look like in real life? How many meetings and discussions does it take before you can be sure you have the right solution to a problem? Business owners and investors want their companies and the people who lead them to be equipped to answer these questions - and quickly.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Great Advice, But It's All Old News

  • By Michael on 08-19-16

Much better than expected!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-30-16

This book is much better than expected! It's practical, with plenty worksheets (on the Sprint book website) and contains clear, helpful directions based on Jake's experience working with this.

The sprints are like a mix of scrum and design thinking. Leaning more towards the latter.

Some have remarked the book is full of Google-talk. I didn't feel that way at all. They mention Google a few times, but it's never obnoxious or distracting at any level.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • The Code of the Extraordinary Mind

  • 10 Unconventional Laws to Redefine Your Life and Succeed on Your Own Terms
  • By: Vishen Lakhiani
  • Narrated by: Vishen Lakhiani
  • Length: 9 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,206
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,961
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,944

The Code of the Extraordinary Mind is a blueprint of laws to break us free from the shackles of ordinary life. It makes a case that everything we know about the world is mostly decided not by rational choice but instead by conditioning and habit. And thus most people live their lives based on limiting rules and outdated beliefs about pretty much everything - love, work, money, parenting, sex, health, and more - that they inherit and pass on from generation to generation.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Anything but Ordinary

  • By Read Eyed on 05-28-16

Brules and... Bliscipline... ?

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-30-16

The book starts out by Vishen directing the listener to the "genius, world-first, book-publishing-status-quo paradigm-shifting never thought off before" (para-phrased) online app, that was created to accompany the book. That link redirects to MindValley, his business website. I created an account there, and was... underwhelmed. Not by MindValley itself, which is a huge site, but by the books resources/app.

Overall, the book is full of Vishen, Vishen and more Vishen. And little else. Yes, there are lots of quotes and ideas, but apart from the (IMO lame) "new words like brules and bliscipline that he had (??) to invent and add to the English language..." there isn't much NEW in the book. It's more like 30 other self-dev. books being thrown in a blender.

Disorganized, despite good efforts by f.e. separating the book into three parts, coming up with catchy chapter titles, etc. It's simply difficult to remember what you've heard/learned during your listen.

Nathaniel Branden, 6 Pillars of Self-Esteem, is a book I'd recommend instead.

  • Scaling Up

  • How a Few Companies Make It...and Why the Rest Don't, Rockefeller Habits 2.0
  • By: Verne Harnish
  • Narrated by: Spencer Cannon
  • Length: 8 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,275
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,083
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,080

It's been over a decade since Verne Harnish's best-selling book Mastering the Rockefeller Habits was first released. Scaling Up: How a Few Companies Make It...and Why the Rest Don't is the first major revision of this business classic. In Scaling Up, Harnish and his team share practical tools and techniques for building an industry-dominating business.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Just what the doctor ordered

  • By David on 04-08-15

It's good – but mostly for large companies

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-20-16

It's a good book. Dense and full of wisdom. Highly practical too – lots of worksheets to fill out.

It's mostly for companies 7-10 employees and up though. I can't help but wonder why there aren't more books written, targeting the solopreneurial startup phase: from 1 (you) to those 2-3 employees and up to the 8-12 employees where books like this one can take over, offering helpful advice for those stages.

Yes, there are plenty startup books with advice on how to select the best team members – but few that talk about the dangers of taking in/on those initial few employees: cashflow-wise, it can be a huge killer to any little business.

When should one hire the first employee – and what signs and pitfalls should one look for, in times of distress (bad cashflow for example)... And should one even hire ANY employees at all? Or rather find a solid business partner and a mentor, essentially making it a small company of three?What are the pros and cons of such a constellation?

Again: very few books seem to target this market and those vital questions. Without first finding the answers to them, and the challenges they represent; there's little need for a book like Scaling Up – many of us just aren't there yet.

7 of 8 people found this review helpful

  • The Content Trap

  • A Strategist's Guide to Digital Change
  • By: Bharat Anand
  • Narrated by: Jason Culp
  • Length: 16 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 143
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 123
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 123

Companies everywhere face two major challenges today: getting noticed and getting paid. To confront these obstacles, Bharat Anand examines a range of businesses around the world, from The New York Times to The Economist, from Chinese Internet giant Tencent to Scandinavian digital trailblazer Schibsted, and from talent management to the future of education.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Interesting topic/thesis – boring execution/book

  • By Oliver Nielsen on 11-10-16

Interesting topic/thesis – boring execution/book

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-10-16

It's a rather long book. And it feels even longer. Even at 3x speed. Yes, it is that boring. Could with great effect have been edited to half its length. It would still be too long, but a lot more interesting and concise.

Everything (absolutely *everything*) in the book, consists of case stories and anecdotes. Maybe it's a matter of taste – I just can't stand books that goes from one anecdote to the next from paragraph to paragraph. It's tiring to listen to. Imagine being on a date with someone who talks about his mom this moment, while 2 mins ago he/she babbled about his sports bike, and 5 minutes later, he/she's talking about dog food. Would you go on a second date? Likely not. This book is like that. And I feel dumb for listening to 2/3rds of it, before giving up. Like going on ten dates with the babble-head!

It's as dry as silica gel (that little bag inside shoeboxes) – academic in tone, with zero emotion, let alone humour.

It's also not organized as coherently as it could be. Difficult to make practical sense of.

Two other books I can recommend, instead of getting this one, are:

Digital Relevance – by Ardath Albee. AMAZING book for content marketers. Only available as a real book (not audiobook) though. But it's the most highlighted book I've ever had. So full of marketing wisdom and practical nuggets of gold.

Disruptive Marketing – by Geoffrey Colon. It's like a more digestible version of The Content Trap. A much better read, that I listened to a couple of weeks ago, and already look forward to relistening to.

The Content Trap – don't fall into the trap of buying it;)

17 of 19 people found this review helpful

  • The 80/20 Individual

  • By: Richard Koch
  • Narrated by: Richard Aspel
  • Length: 6 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 25
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 13
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 11

Koch shows how to maximize success in your career and life by using the proven principle that 80 percent of changes in the world result from the most powerful 20 percent of actions and ideas. He'll show how to use your own powerful "20 percent spike" - your most creative ideas and unique skills - to measure the amount of value you bring to your employer, clients, or customers. For most people, there is a huge disparity between their intrinsic value and the compensation they receive for their efforts.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Should be titled "How to Start a Business"

  • By Oliver Nielsen on 11-10-16

Should be titled "How to Start a Business"

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-10-16

Let me preface this by saying that I am, in fact, a Richard Koch fan.

This book is titled wrong. Likely to ride the success of his previous bestseller The 80/20 Principle. There's little about 80/20 / The Pareto Principle in this book. Rather, it's a book about how to start a business as an entrepreneur.

If it had a better fitting title, it'd be a better book – for its intended audience.

It's clear that what Richard is most passionate about in life, is finding (and helping create/grow) great businesses. He's an investor, and his latest books The Star Principle (my fave – it's killer! Highly recommended) and Simplify (one you can skip) are like continuations of this one, the "The 80/20 Individual". His thoughts on what makes businesses successful, are very valuable. Just don't expect more 80/20 nuggets from him than what was in The 80/20 Principle. The only other 80/20 book available, is Perry Marshall's 80/20 Sales & Marketing – which I also highly recommend.

This one? Meh. Not so much. The business-building framework in The Star Principle is a more evolved version of the one he presents in this one.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful