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G. Parish

WILLOUGHBY, OH, US
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  • Good Omens

  • By: Neil Gaiman, Terry Pratchett
  • Narrated by: Martin Jarvis
  • Length: 12 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 22,578
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 19,603
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 19,633

The world will end on Saturday. Next Saturday. Just before dinner, according to The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch, the world's only completely accurate book of prophecies, written in 1655. The armies of Good and Evil are amassing and everything appears to be going according to Divine Plan. Except that a somewhat fussy angel and a fast-living demon are not actually looking forward to the coming Rapture. And someone seems to have misplaced the Antichrist.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • You'll laugh yourself silly

  • By goddess_of_pipework on 11-28-15

A good tale, if you can keep up.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-19-19

I recently finished listening to Good Omens, a novel by Terry Pratchett & Neil Gaiman. The story purports to revolve around two angels, one a fallen Angel and the other more heavenly. In the tale the day of days is upon us and armegeddon is nigh. It appears both sides care more about their war than the mortals caught betwixt them. These two angels, unusual friends to be sure, seem to be the only ones that care what happens to the mortals.
The story, unsurprisingly with Pratchett involved, has a lot of witty humor. That being said though it wanders about, sometimes a bit aimlessly, through a large cast of characters and the scene changes often come with a new paragraph.
This tendency to change scenes so often, as well as the large cast of characters can leave the listener panting to catch up. Overall there is a good tale here and it asks some deep questions, but it is hampered by the chosen writing style.
Conclusion: I think this is a good pick for anyone who has a penchant for taking a wry look at heaven and hell and all the insanity in between. It doesn't easily fall into a specific genre, but hopefully that will improve its appeal to a larger audience.

  • Confessions of a D-List Supervillain

  • By: Jim Bernheimer
  • Narrated by: Jeffrey Kafer, Talmadge Ragan
  • Length: 5 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,693
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,484
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,489

Exploding from the pages of Horror, Humor, and Heroes, Volume One - it’s the full length adventures of the one and only Mechani-Cal! So grab your battlesuit and prepare to get a little nasty.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Not Quite The Avengers, But Just As Much Fun...

  • By Michael on 10-08-12

Can a Supervillain save the world?

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-08-19

I recently listened to Confessions of a D-LIST Supervillain. This is the second book in the D-LIST Supervillain series.
MechaniCal continues his adventures in this book. The end of the world is upon us, courtesy of what appears to be alien mind controlling creatures attaching themselves to peoples bodies and taking over their minds.
Isolated and alone, courtesy of his powered armor, MechaniCal faces a critical decision. Either save the human race or die of boredom and starvation. Thankfully, no one is aware or they might object to having a dishonorable supervillain trying to save them.
The book is extremely well narrated and the narrator is a great match for the main character.
Conclusion: This is a great book for everyone. If this sounds even vaguely interesting I suggest picking it up for a fun read.

  • Origins of a D-List Supervillain

  • By: Jim Bernheimer
  • Narrated by: Jeffrey Kafer
  • Length: 7 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,528
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,415
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,415

Even D-list supervillains have to start somewhere. Follow Cal Stringel's misadventures as he climbs to the lowest levels of supervillany in the prequel to the smash hit, Confessions of a D-List Supervillain. Angry that he wouldn't be known as the engineer who made Ultraweapon's force blasters, Cal resigns to chase after a bigger, better paycheck. However, the Promethia Corporation isn't going to let him go that easily and sets out to make his life a living hell.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Anti-hero beginnings.

  • By Teresa on 02-26-15

Want to become a Supervillain? Here's how!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-08-19

I listened to Origins of a D-list Supervillain recently. I had accidentally listened to the second book of this series first, so I am sure it somewhat prejudiced my view of this book.
This is the story of Cal and how he became a supervillain, in a world rife with both superheroes and supervillains. He is a particularly relatable character that, despite his deeds, generates a surprising amount of empathy.
The tale is well written and extremely well thought out with a variety of interesting characters.
Conclusion: This is a good tale for those who have interests in fictional world's that are abundant with super powered characters. The narrator really helped make this a fun listen and was a great match for the main character.

  • Shadow of Victory

  • By: David Weber
  • Narrated by: Kevin T. Collins
  • Length: 37 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 661
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 610
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 605

Sometimes things don't work out exactly as planned. The Mesan Alignment has a plan - one it's been working on for centuries. A plan to remake the galaxy and genetically improve the human race - its way. Until recently things have gone pretty much as scheduled, but then the Alignment hit a minor bump in the road called the Star Empire of Manticore. So the Alignment engineered a war between the Solarian League, the biggest and most formidable interstellar power in human history.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Good story, poor reader

  • By Paul on 12-14-16

Only for serious Honorverse fans

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-08-19

I recently finished listened to Shadow of Victory the 4th book in the Saganami series. This series takes place in the Honorverse. The Honorverse is a variety of Sci-fi, mostly military Sci-fi, works in the universe of Honor Harrington. The original stories were all ones that featured the career of Honor Harrington and her career in the space navy of the Star Kingdom of Manticore.
The original series ended up with multiple spin off series. Almost all of them were excellent. The Saganami series is an attempt to bring the diverse story lines from the multiple series together into a final culmination that will tie up most loose ends.
This book is, I am saddened to say, poorly executed. I cannot say it is poorly written, however, the Weber was off his storytelling game. The book is filled with so much inside baseball and scenes that assumes intimate knowledge with other parts of the series that even a serious Honorverse fan will be hard put to keep up. For anyone else, it would be dancing on the edge of incomprehensible.
Conclusion: This is for serious Honorverse fans. I wouldn't suggest this for anyone else.

  • Logos Run

  • Run Duology, Book 2
  • By: William C. Dietz
  • Narrated by: Sean Runnette
  • Length: 11 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 46
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 41
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 42

Making good on a promise to a dead man, Rebo must deliver an AI known as Logos to a mysterious backwater planet. Once there, Logos will be capable of restoring the system of star gates that once knitted the settled worlds together. But as the Techno Society wars with murderous antitechnics, Rebo gets caught in the middle - and all he can do is run.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A Great Sci-fi Adventure novel

  • By G. Parish on 03-03-19

A Great Sci-fi Adventure novel

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-03-19

I recently finished listening to Logos Run, the second book in William C. Dietz's Run duology. This book series is an unusual bird. While loads of Sci-fi is being produced, not much of it marries Sci-fi with classic adventure telling which usually includes travel, exploration, random events, etc., while marrying such to an overarching narrative.
When the two are married they create a sub-genre that I can only attempt to describe as Sci-fi Adventure stories. This is a continuation of the adventure of the previous novel set in a universe that marries barbarism amongst declining technology with a gamble on rebuilding the universe, but it might be at the cost of its freedom.
Well written and well narrated, it's thoroughly enjoyable.
Conclusion: I think anyone who enjoys either traditional adventure stories or good Sci-fi will enjoy this tale.

  • The Phoenix Transformed

  • Book Three of the Enduring Flame
  • By: James Mallory, Mercedes Lackey
  • Narrated by: William Dufris
  • Length: 24 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 355
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 246
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 244

With more than one twist in the telling, centering on a magic-plagued journey across a blistering desert, The Phoenix Transformed is the stunning conclusion to Mercedes Lackey and James Mallory's Enduring Flame Trilogy.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Disappointing

  • By Katja on 01-05-10

A solid finish to the trilogy

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-27-19

I recently finished listening to the Phoenix Transformed, the 3rd book in the Enduring Flame series. The book straddles a strange place somewhere between older YA (late teens) and adult. It is fairly standard fantasy fare and only the depth of the characters keep it interesting. The story finally comes to some solid fruition in this final novel in the trilogy and has a decent payoff.
The narrator generally did a solid job as well.
Conclusion: I am not sure who this book is targeting. I might suggest it either for an older YA fantasy novel, however, I wouldn't suggest it for anyone else unless they are already fans of this particular series.

  • The Phoenix Endangered

  • Book Two of the Enduring Flame
  • By: Mercedes Lackey, James Mallory
  • Narrated by: William Dufris
  • Length: 17 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 401
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 264
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 266

Tiercel, a budding High Mage, and Harrier, a reluctant Knight-Mage, develop greater power - and learn of the evils of war when they see the devastation caused by the fanatical armies of the Wild Mage Bisochim.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Give the kids a break!

  • By Amazon Customer on 07-27-09

Not for all audience's

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-27-19

I recently finished listening to the Phoenix Endangered, the 2nd book in the Enduring Flame series. The book straddles a strange place somewhere between older YA (late teens) and adult. It is fairly standard fantasy fare and only the depth of the characters keep it interesting. It is basically another rewrite of the hero's journey, though I should add that it was a decent effort.
The narrator generally did a solid job as well.
Conclusion: I am not sure who this book is targeting. I might suggest it either for an older YA fantasy novel, however, I wouldn't suggest it for anyone else unless they are already fans of either authors work.

  • King Solomon's Mines

  • By: Henry Rider Haggard
  • Narrated by: Simon Prebble
  • Length: 8 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 856
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 781
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 785

One of the bestselling novels of the 19th century, King Solomon's Mines has inspired dozens of adventure stories, including Edgar Rice Burroughs's Tarzan books and the Indiana Jones movies. Vivid and enormously action-packed, Henry Rider Haggard's tale of danger and discovery continues to shock and thrill, as it has since it was first presented to the public and heralded as "the most amazing book ever written."

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • From a different culture

  • By Ed on 07-08-13

A Daring Tale of Adventure

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-09-19

I recently finished the classic book King Solomon's Mines. This is an extremely well written tale of adventure, full of noble deeds, a beautiful woman, and tension at almost every turn.

Before I get much further I need to explain something to those who might read this review. This is something many of you will already know, however, I include it for those of you who don't. Classic literature often includes disturbing things, in the modern context racism, sexism, etc. While these terms would not be inaccurate in a modern context, they are not accurate as descriptions of the literature that is ancient. As a simple example I shall cite the cultural differences between us and the Romans. They believed that war was the preferable state of things and actually thought they lost access to one of their gods and his protection when not at war. They would have been appalled by many Western cultures search for peace. The point is that judging another culture in a distant time by our current morals isn't something that is either realistic or logical.

Within that context this book does feature themes that in their own time would likely have been seen as highly progressive, praising Africans for their nobility and courage. This book also holds concepts that could easily be viewed by a modern reader as racist. Their lack of concern for conservation, either of animal or ancient ruin could also be cited here. They were, among other things, treasure hunters. They seen no reason to be ashamed of that.

Conclusion: I think this book will not be received well by most modern readers. Only those who can stretch their viewpoint to see the world from a wholly different time will enjoy this daring tale of adventure.

  • Treecat Wars

  • Star Kingdom, Book 3
  • By: David Weber, Jane Lindskold
  • Narrated by: Khristine Hvam
  • Length: 10 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 720
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 647
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 651

Book Three by international writing phenomenon David Weber. Two young settlers on a pioneer planet seeks to stop a war and to save the intelligent alien treecats from exploitation by unscrupulous humans. The fires are out, but the trouble’s just beginning for the treecats. On pioneer planet Sphinx, ruined lands and the approach of winter force the now Landless Clan to seek new territory. They have one big problem - there’s nowhere to go. Worse, their efforts to find a new home awaken the enmity of the closest treecat clan - a stronger group who’s not giving up a single branch without a fight.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Third 'chapter' of "Tree cats' meet "Humans"

  • By PlantCrone on 11-02-13

Solid YA Novel

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-20-19

I recently finished reading Treecat Wars, third book in the YA series Star Kingdom. The series is set in the Honorverse, a century or two before most of the tales told in the Honor Harrington novels.
This particular novel is focused on the early relationship between humans and treecats, before everyone accepted them as a sentient species.
The recent fires on the planet Sphinx have left the resources to few for all treecats in a particular area to survive and, if it cannot be prevented a war will ensue among the treecat clans.
The local teens who are bonded to treecats are doing their best to stop this tragedy, but are hampered in their efforts by those who would see the treecats destroyed rather than suffer a loss in the value of their land holdings on Sphinx.
Conclusion: This is an excellent YA sci-fi book, with a coming of age tale woven into it as well. I would recommend this to any teenager, anyone who likes cats, or anyone that is a fan of the Honorverse. It's well written and easily enjoyed.

  • Pavane

  • By: Keith Roberts
  • Narrated by: Steven Crossley
  • Length: 9 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 445
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 396
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 398

Considered Keith Roberts' masterwork, this novel consists of linked short stories (six measures and a coda) of a 20th century in which the Roman Catholic Church controls the Western world, and has done so since Queen Elizabeth of England was assassinated in 1588. The Protestant Reformation never happened, and the world is kept in a Dark Age of steam-power transportation, with no allowance for electrical power, by a tyrannical Rome.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • It's the Characters that Outline the World

  • By Troy on 03-01-13

Just Buy It

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-17-19

I recently finished listening to Pavane, by Keith Roberts. Thus is part of Audible's Neil Gaiman presents series. The series, as I understand it, are made up of books admired by Neil Gaiman, though perhaps not as well known to the general public.
The book is named Pavane after the processional dance of the renaissance era. It was a formal Spanish dance comprised of six parts and a coda. This book is an alternate history that assumes that Elizabeth I was assassinated, the Spanish armada won, and Philip not only extended his own power but that of the church, putting an early end to any chance of a religious Reformation.
This book is written as six separate tales followed by a coda, similarly to the dance after which it was named. This is unusual for an alternate history novel. Most well written alternate history novels, such as 1632, go into great detail about the world they are in. They go to equally great pains to describe the differences in as brief a portrait as possible. If they didn't keep it brief the information would overwhelm any chance of a decent tale.
This is a serious departure from that model, once again reminiscent of the Pavane. Each story is extremely personal, extremely well crafted, and oft heart wrenching. The world of this alternate history is oft shown only as a backdrop, though not one even the fictional characters can ignore. In some areas it is extremely detailed and in other areas it is strangely vague. This style of dancing around the subject, rather than focusing on it directly not only draws one into the story, but also fires the imagination.
Conclusion: This is an excellent choice for any adult. I wouldn't suggest it as a YA novel, however, almost anyone else will find something of value here. It may be alternate history, but it is also made up of some of the best short stories I have had the good fortune to encounter.