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Chris

Powell, WY, United States
  • 35
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  • 146
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  • Red Sails in the Fallout

  • Dungeons & Dragons: Gamma World, Book 2
  • By: Paul Kidd
  • Narrated by: Amanda Carlin
  • Length: 10 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 47
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 46
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 46

In the fall of 2012, scientists at the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva, Switzerland, embarked on a series of high-energy experiments. No one knows exactly what went wrong, but in the blink of an eye, thousands of possible universes all condensed into a single reality.... Between a desert and a dried up sea lies the town of Watering Hole, the only oasis for miles and the home of our intrepid heroes Shaani and Xoota. After some rather harrowing adventures in the desert, they are followed home by a swarm of empathic earwigs.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Rats and rodents where the rubber hits the road.

  • By Kirk MacNeil on 04-04-13

A GIANT story about mutant animals.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-14-17

I like sci fi, but every book out now is all about big ships battling it out jumping through space wherever. Once in a while something a little different comes out. But this has everything that made sci fi great. The story, the characters, and the world, feel fresh and new. This is the only book have listened to three times, in many, many years.

Also, if Gamma World were a living breathing world instead of game, this would be it. I loved Gamma World, but everyone else was playing D&D. You don't need to know anything about the game to understand this story. In fact the story is kind of how the game should be played if you have a really good GM.

I really, really hope that Paul Kidd gets to pen more of these adventures. It would be great to know what happens with our super mutant team next.

The narrator is great too, she makes it easy to know which person is speaking, the voice is clear and well understood, keeps you engaged, and really tells the story. Wigwig is the best voice.

I can't even remember much about the first book, but this one will stay with me for awhile. I highly recommend this book.

  • Cephrael's Hand

  • A Pattern of Shadow and Light, Book 1
  • By: Melissa McPhail
  • Narrated by: Nick Podehl
  • Length: 32 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,702
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,526
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,521

In Alorin...300 years after the genocidal Adept Wars, the realm is dying, and the blessed Adept race dies with it. One man holds the secret to reverting this decline: Bjorn van Gelderan, a dangerous and enigmatic man whose shocking betrayal three centuries past earned him a traitor's brand. It is the Adept Vestal Raine D'Lacourte's mission to learn what Bjorn knows in the hope of salvaging his race. But first he'll have to find him....

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Great Start to a new series

  • By Michael Harbison on 09-08-16

Lots of dialog, little action.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-16-17

I normally don't buy female written fantasy because they seem to focus on things I don't like(romance and angst) and leave out the stuff I do(action, world building). Sadly, I am sure I am missing out on some good books. But, due to the high ratings, length and Nick, I gave it a try. This book is driven by dialog and lacks in other places. World building is replace by character building. Locations in the world are all over the place and I have a hard time understanding those locations as they relate to one another. I had to listen to this twice and almost gave up many times in favor of a new book to start. Not sure if I will finish the series.

If you want to try a female, well written story, try Rachel Aaron. If you like this type of book, you might want to The Dagger and Coin series.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Home - A Post Apocalyptic/Dystopian Adventure

  • The Traveler, Volume 1
  • By: Tom Abrahams
  • Narrated by: Kevin Pierce
  • Length: 7 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,434
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,338
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,335

Five years after a pneumonic plague killed two-thirds of the world's population, army veteran Marcus Battle is isolated. He's alone with his guns, his food, and the graves of his wife and child. Unaware of the chaos that's befallen everything outside of his central Texas ranch land, Marcus lives a Spartan life. If anyone steps onto his property, he shoots first and never asks questions. But when a woman in distress, chased by marauders, seeks asylum, Marcus has a decision to make.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • One man, his home, his rules.

  • By Brian on 02-26-16

Preachy and typical.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-09-16

May contain some slight spoilers, but no major details.

I understand that the guy and his family believe in the christian mythology and it would have been fine in passing, but the author just keeps pounding you with it. Every other chapter has bible quotes, praying, talking of church and justifying actions using the bible, etc. It just starts to get a little old. If I would have known that I probably wouldn't have gotten this book. It's pretty typical prepper fare, guy is ex military, preps and the world ends. His family dies and he is all alone, story goes from there. Marcus Battle is a little mental, but finding new friends after all this time seems to wake him up the rest of the world and boost his mental health.

Pros: Has a nice little twist in why he may have helped woman. The book is smart and explains why and what is happening with the weapons, food, power, water, traps, use of cover, etc. Not hard to understand why he was able to take out so many people on his home turf. When people do get hurt they just don't brush it off and the author makes it feel authentic. No cursing, which can be a good or bad thing.

Con: Cartel people, IE, criminals, aren't known to be the smartest people, but they do some dumb things. The bad guys just don't really seem that bad. They are described in one way but kind of act another. Instead of shooting the good guy on sight, the bad guy has the typical diatribe until help comes along and he is of course saved.

The narrator has strong and clear voice, but doesn't use it to much effect. His reading straight forward and bland. For example the son is said to cough between each word but he just reads the quote and it makes the kid sound just fine. He does try to use different voices for each character, but they are so bland it's hard to tell sometimes. At least the author clues us in to who is speaking so that helps.

All in all it is not a bad book, there are some that are much worse and few that are better. Not sure if I would recommend it, though. Not sure if will continue the series or not, but I would like to know how it finishes now that I have started.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Among Thieves

  • A Tale of the Kin, Book 1
  • By: Douglas Hulick
  • Narrated by: Kirby Heyborne
  • Length: 15 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 149
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 137
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 137

Drothe has been a member of the Kin for years, rubbing elbows with thieves and murderers while smuggling relics on the side. But when an ancient book falls into his hands, Drothe finds himself in possession of a relic capable of bringing down emperors - a relic everyone in the underworld would kill to obtain.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Interesting, different.

  • By Chris on 12-13-13

Interesting, different.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-13-13

Drothe is in no way special, not even anti hero special. He has no real talent, can be cruel and mean, and short tempered. He does have his moments of caring and kindness, though. He has the best of luck and the worst of luck, in this mobsters meets fantasy meets mystery tale. He bounces from meeting with people to battling for his life while searching the scant clues he finds along the way in search of potent relic. The end is a bit of a surprise, ending with Drothe in position even he couldn't have imagined. It leaves the second book wide open for possibilities.
The author does a good job of making you interested in a man you probably wouldn't have as friend or even care to know. The magic system is hardly explained, but happens in strange ways that still keep it fresh. The narrator draws you in even further using his clear unassuming voice and different characterizations.
I liked this book because the main character is pretty plain and simple, but it is his journey that leaves you wanting to see whats just around the corner.

If you liked the Gentlemen Bastards, Dark Angel, or Riyria series, you might like this one, but don't expect this to be anything like those.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Flesh & Bone

  • Rot & Ruin Series, Book 3
  • By: Jonathan Maberry
  • Narrated by: Brian Hutchison
  • Length: 10 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 848
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 788
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 788

Reeling from the devastation of Dust & Decay, Benny Imura and his friends plunge deep into the zombie-infested wastelands of the great Rot & Ruin. Benny, Nix, Lilah, and Chong journey through a fierce wilderness that was once America, searching for the jet they saw in the skies months ago. If that jet exists, then humanity itself must have survived somewhere.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Good 3rd in the series

  • By Lynn on 07-18-15

About time!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-29-13

I was waiting forever for the audio release. I even wrote Jonathan Maberry to find out when it was coming out and told me it wasn't, my hopes were dashed in ever finishing the story. Well, it was a welcomed surprise to see it one day sitting in the pre-order section.

This story fills outs the questions from the first two books, but opens more up at what will happen in next book. In this book we find a death cult group and learn about new types of zombies. Not to spoil anything, but if you have read other Maberry books, a certain character pops up in the middle of this one. That put a big ol' smile on my face.

From the sounds of it, the next book will be the last one.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Scholar

  • The Fourth Book of the Imager Portfolio
  • By: L. E. Modesitt Jr.
  • Narrated by: William Dufris
  • Length: 19 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 515
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 457
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 462

Hundreds of years before the time of Imager, the continent of Lydar is fragmented. Years of war have consolidated five nations into three-Bovaria, Telaryn, and Antiago. Quaeryt is a scholar and friend of Bhayar, the young ruler of Telaryn. Worried about his future and the escalating intrigues in Solis, the capital city, Quaeryt persuades Bhayar to send him to Tilbor.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • This is actually the true beginning of the series

  • By Joe on 05-14-12

Better than the first three.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-20-13

Just have to say I enjoyed this section better than the first three. To me it seems the pace is faster, the action a little bit more engaging, and the story is tighter. I like the fact that we see how imaging is explored to come up with more tools. In the end though the author comes up with a very powerful magic system, but seems limited in his imagination on how to use it. I like Quaeryt much more, he is more reckless and daring than Rhenn. Quaeryt more roguish by far and little more free and easy. The narrator is still dry to me, but I have come to expect to hear his voice and now associate it with the Imager series.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Another Fine Myth

  • Myth Adventures, Book 1
  • By: Robert Asprin
  • Narrated by: Noah Michael Levine
  • Length: 5 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,120
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,011
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,018

Start at the beginning, in Another Fine Myth, as Skeeve, an apprentice wizard, meets the demon Aahz. Though it's not love, or even like at first sight they form a connection - saving their lives - between them. Follow them in Myth Conceptions, as Skeeve and Aahz test their talent when they decide to take on an entire army themselves and continue on in Myth Directions. Then Skeeve finds himself alone with his own apprentice applicant, a king, in Hit or Myth and must deal with a medieval Mob!

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Don't myth these adventures!

  • By Chris on 04-16-13

Don't myth these adventures!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-16-13

Out of all the books I read as a teen in the 80's, this is the one I was happiest to see to make it to audible. The wait has been long but worth it. If you ever read Stainless Steel Rat, Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy, Disc World, or Xanth books, you will probably like this one, too. It is set along the lines of medieval times but bounces around many dimensions. The magic of this series is the trouble Aahz and Skeeve manage to get themselves into and out of. There is a lot of word play that is main source of the comedy and interaction. The part I always like best was all the weird and strange worlds and people that Aahz and Skeeve come across. Aahz is a little one dimensional, set in his ways and often falls back on his 'situational ethics'. Skeeve is little more well rounded as he comes into his own, showing a range of emotions and the goodness of his heart. How Skeeve could have ever became a thief, is beyond me, as he always feels guilt towards those he feels he has wronged.
The narrator does a good job, but I always imagined Skeeve with a little younger sounding voice, but after listening for a bit, that was soon forgotten. He gives all the main characters a unique voice that make listening enjoyable and easy to follow along.

15 of 15 people found this review helpful

  • The Invisible Order

  • Rise of the Darklings
  • By: Paul Crilley
  • Narrated by: Katherine Kellgren
  • Length: 7 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 160
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 124
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 125

The Invisible Order is the first book in an amazing new series by Paul Crilley, skillfully narrated by Katherine Kellgren. Emily Snow is twelve years old, supporting herself and her younger brother on the streets of Victorian England by selling watercress. One early winter morning on her way to buy supplies, she encounters a piskie—a small but very sarcastic fey creature that has been cornered by a group of the Black Sidhe, piskies from an opposing clan.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Fun and Imaginative

  • By Sheri C on 09-21-11

A mini Dresden

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-05-13

If you like urban fantasy like Dresden files or Iron Druid you might like this one. It deals with much the same lore, but is toned down in violence and sex for a kid level. My 14 year old likes it well enough. I like the narrator, she very English, but has a wide range for voices for all the characters so you tell who is speaking all the time. Not sure if I will finish the series but I will be getting the 2nd book to see where it is headed.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Something from the Nightside

  • Nightside, Book 1
  • By: Simon R. Green
  • Narrated by: Marc Vietor
  • Length: 5 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,933
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,355
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,372

"Taylor is the name. John Taylor...My card says I'm a detective, but what I really am is an expert on finding things. It's part of the Gift I was born with as a child of the Nightside - the hidden heart of London where it's always three a.m., where inhuman creatures and otherworldly gods walk side-by-side in the endless darkness of the soul. Assignment: Joanna Barrett hires me to track down her teenage daughter, who decided to forgo the circus and run away to the Nightside."

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The Nightside

  • By Kemi on 04-18-09

Not for the squemish!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-11-12

If you like the Iron Druid or The Dresden Files, you might like this series. It's just a lot weirder and stranger. It dares to go a direction most other books could or would not go. Mr. Green certainly has vivid imagination. There is a book series turned into an audio play he does called Deathstalker, that is 180 degree from this story but no less imaginative and fun. Marc Vietor is great narrator, but it did take me sometime to really enjoy his work and get in to it. He also does the Black Company series and if I did not know he had done both books I would have never guessed. He shapes his voice to the book and characters.

I really like this series, it is fast paced and keeps moving right along. It feels like 20 hours packed into 5 or 6 compared to some other books. It's gruesome, bloody, funny, scarey, and adventurous, sometimes all at once. The Nightside is a dark and horrid place where anyone can find whatever pleasure they desire. There are the abused and the abusers, the tormented and tormenters, it is a place of perpetual darkness. But, there are a few souls in this dark world that do shine some light in the corners. This is one of the darker urban fantasies have listened to so far, I would not recommend it for kids. It seems that one does not really have to listen to the books in order to enjoy them, each story stands on it's own, but there is some information that does come across as the series progresses, so it is best to read them in order.

There is a book with 4 short stories, including one from Mr. Green that is a Nightside story but read by another narrator, called Mean Streets.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Monster Hunter International

  • By: Larry Correia
  • Narrated by: Oliver Wyman
  • Length: 24 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,221
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14,801
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14,771

Five days after Owen Zastava Pitt pushed his insufferable boss out of a 14th story window, he woke up in the hospital with a scarred face, an unbelievable memory, and a job offer. It turns out that monsters are real. All the things from myth, legend, and B-movies are out there, waiting in the shadows. Some of them are evil, and some are just hungry. Monster Hunter International is the premier eradication company in the business. And now Owen is their newest recruit.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Suprizingly entertaining

  • By Konstantin on 02-17-12

Not too bad.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-21-12

Two things I disliked about the book. First is that monsters are suppose to be a big secret but about half the world seems to know. Second, I am so tired of the standard fare of monsters, vamps, werewolves, ghouls, etc. I really wish more authors that could be more creative.

Other than that once I got started into the book it was not bad at all. I like the fact the book keeps a pretty fast pace. I did not care the for last battle though, the fight dragged for more than two hours and could have been a little more condensed. Sometimes the book could be a little predictable. The narrator very is good, but, for me, there was just that spark missing that really makes an audio book shine. His voice is clear and understandable and he does a pretty good with female voices. Looking forward to the rest in the series.

If you like this book I recommend the Joe Ledger series or if you like a like more fantasy mixed into your military battles try the Black Company. If you're more into urban fantasy with a little more magic and less guns try Dresden files or Iron Druid.

17 of 29 people found this review helpful