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  • 16
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  • The Reformation

  • A History
  • By: Diarmaid MacCulloch
  • Narrated by: Anne Flosnik
  • Length: 36 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 133
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 127
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 126

At a time when men and women were prepared to kill - and be killed - for their faith, the Protestant Reformation tore the Western world apart. Acclaimed as the definitive account of these epochal events, Diarmaid MacCulloch's award-winning history brilliantly recreates the religious battles of priests, monarchs, scholars, and politicians - from the zealous Martin Luther and his 95 Theses to the polemical John Calvin to the radical Igantius Loyola, from the tortured Thomas Cranmer to the ambitious Philip II.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent

  • By Eli Shem Tov on 05-15-17

Now I see why there is no sample ...

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-16-17

What did you like best about The Reformation? What did you like least?

It is a great story so far, but I will have to buy the book.

What was one of the most memorable moments of The Reformation?

Sadly, when Anne Flosnik started to speak because I spent the first 5 minutes thinking my Kindle malfunctioned and was reading in the non-Whisper synch robotic voice.

What didn’t you like about Anne Flosnik’s performance?

She took theater 101 I guess. She must have made it through the training on enunciation but quit after that. Literally every syllable is emphasized equally. It sounds just like a robot because she pauses between every syllable. I also had to listen to it at 1.5 times the speed.

Do you think The Reformation needs a follow-up book? Why or why not?

It couldn't be any longer ...

Any additional comments?

I will buy the book. The fact that I seldom read a book over 200 pages speaks to both the quality of the book and the horrendous narration.

Please get an audio sample up so people can be forewarned about the reader's performance.

30 of 31 people found this review helpful

  • Creative Visualization

  • By: Shakti Gawain
  • Narrated by: Shakti Gawain
  • Length: 3 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 491
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 319
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 301

Use the power of your imagination to help create what you want in life! This best selling guide will teach you simple and practical techniques for changing negative habit patterns, improving your self-esteem, reaching career goals, developing your creativity, and much more. Techniques include deep relaxation, asking for guidance, and visualizing goals. Create an inner sanctuary and open up the natural centers of your body - and use your mental imagery to achieve positive changes in your life.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Beautiful Classic. A Life-Changer.

  • By Cat on 04-26-17

A life changer

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-30-16

I was told to read this book in college, and I wish I had. People sometimes think twice about learning more of the mystic all elements behind every day life, which is unfortunate. Much of the same things are invited and some of the greatest personal development coaches ever. Much of it is right here in this book.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Cultural Literacy for Religion: Everything the Well-Educated Person Should Know

  • By: Mark Berkson, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Mark Berkson
  • Length: 12 hrs and 19 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,728
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,525
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,504

According to polls conducted by Gallup and the Pew Research Forum on Religion & Public Life, the majority of Americans fail basic tests about religion, including tests on their own faith. This is troublesome because religious literacy is about so much more than naming deities or knowing the stories of ancient history. For many of us, religion is a way to examine and understand ourselves. These 24 enlightening lectures offer you the chance to experience the world's religions from all angles – historical, theological, and cultural.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • All the Basics, East and West

  • By Troy on 07-13-15

Great Work

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-06-16

Where does Cultural Literacy for Religion: Everything the Well-Educated Person Should Know rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

One of the best.

What was one of the most memorable moments of Cultural Literacy for Religion: Everything the Well-Educated Person Should Know?

The end. When starting the work, some of the practices seemed fantastical; at the end, one walks away with an appreciation of the beauty of these works.

What does Professor Mark Berkson bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

He is very passionate and a good speaker.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

Understanding the taboo against eating cows in Hinduism being related to the reverence they feel for such a nurturing animal (from where milk and butter derive) was moving.

Any additional comments?

Only complaint would be there was a lot more time spent on Jewish holidays, some spent on Christian holidays and practically none on the other religions. That said, I do think that the professor remained professional and objective throughout.

  • The Old Testament

  • By: Amy-Jill Levine, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Amy-Jill Levine
  • Length: 12 hrs and 10 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 806
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 716
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 706

The Old Testament - written in ancient Israel by many different authors over the course of a thousand years - has had more meaning to more people than any other book the world has known. In a series of 24 lively lectures, Professor Levine explores selected passages from the texts known as the Old Testament, the Hebrew Bible, and the Tanakh, revealing how fresh research and findings from scholars of archaeology, cross-cultural studies, and comparative religion can deepen your understanding.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A critical but inspiring 'walk thru the' Bible

  • By Jacobus on 12-14-13

Misleading Title Replete with Sarcasm & Mockery

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-06-16

Would you try another book from The Great Courses and/or Professor Amy-Jill Levine?

Certainly from the Great Courses, and certainly not from Amy Levine.

What do you think your next listen will be?

Something that accurately reflects the title of the book.

Have you listened to any of Professor Amy-Jill Levine’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

Never thank God.

If you could play editor, what scene or scenes would you have cut from The Old Testament?

1. The continual references to other myths put in the text to further her agenda (and besides isn't the Old Testament complicated enough without embarking on a continual compare/contrast?).2. Her continual promotion of the feminist agenda (this is fine, but state it in the title. And for the record, if you are going to offer a critical reading it would be nice to play contrarian with other points as well, to be fair, not just the ones that promote your agenda).3. The mockery and sarcasm. I am ok with some very strong critiques of a variety of subject matter, but do it objectively and without the ridicule please. If you don't like the stuff, don't read it and certainly don't lecture and profit from it.

Any additional comments?

As an professor I try to remain objective. I am fine with remarkably critical readings from different perspectives on a variety of topics; however, Dr. Levine was not objective. This resulted in lectures replete with feminist criticism of the topic, mockery of other people's interpretations and a serious insinuation that the content of the Old Testament was "inspired" by other mythologies.I didn't expect a religious/theological commentary based on other reviews. I was, however, expecting a rigorous academic commentary, but was sadly disappointed. I continued to listen, assuming that there may be some tidbits useful to pursue or raise over coffee with other academics. But I could not stand the constant references to other mythological systems (which complicated and already complicated topic), the promotion of her feminist views (mocking King Solomon for his wives, called Samson "stupid", etc) and the open mockery of other scholars' interpretations.According to her Wikipedia page: "A self-described "Yankee Jewish feminist who teaches in a predominantly Protestant divinity school in the buckle of the Bible Belt[...]". And she is Professor of New Testament Studies. Modern identifies are complicated. I get it. And critiques have their place. I get that too. But find an appropriate forum and air out your political, social and religious agenda to maintain some semblance of objectivity and do not pass it off as the truth in a work called the "Old Testament". It is a disservice to academic, readers and the Great Courses.For the religiously minded, I would recommend Sacred Texts or Cultural Literacy for Religion. Both are excellent, and while not being theological per se, do refrain from the mockery and promotion of personal agendas.And in my attempt to remain objective, her voice and speaking style was well-seasoned. Hence the four stars for performance.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • The Big Three in Economics

  • Adam Smith, Karl Marx, and John Maynard Keynes
  • By: Mark Skousen
  • Narrated by: Jeff Riggenbach
  • Length: 9 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 252
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 143
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 144

The Big Three in Economics reveals the battle of ideas among the three most influential economists in world history: Adam Smith, representing laissez faire; Karl Marx, reflecting the radical socialist model; and John Maynard Keynes, symbolizing big government and the welfare state. History comes alive in this fascinating story of opposing views that continue to play a fundamental role in today's politics and economics.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Cut and paste

  • By Jan on 05-25-07

Very well read author

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-27-16

I have a lot of experience in social theory, and can say I was impressed with the author's knowledge. Far more detailed that your Great Courses material.

The book is NOT limited to these three writers but instead spans from early French economists all the way through Milton Friedman.

The only complaint I have is with their treatment of Karl -- going so far as to use elements in his life to discredit him, including the suggestion he endorsed "dark" views on religion.

  • The Vietnam War: History in an Hour

  • By: Neil Smith
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Keeble
  • Length: 1 hr and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 141
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 128
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 126

History for busy people. Listen to a concise history of the Vietnam War in just one hour. War, what is it good for? The Vietnam War: History In an Hour gives a gripping account of the most important Cold War-era conflict, fought between the United States and the Viet Cong, the Vietnam People’s Army and their Communist allies. It was one of the most traumatic military conflicts America has ever been involved in – and provoked a backlash of anti-war protests at home.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • An Afterburner

  • By Shah Alam on 10-25-17

Good if you're somewhat familiar

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-24-16

It is a great, well performed version. However, I found that I had to go look up some of the terms and read more because some of it was a little to dense for me. Honestly, I am not too familiar with this time in history. I think if you were somewhat familiar or I needed a little deeper dive or quick refresh this would be great

  • An Introduction to Greek Philosophy

  • By: David Roochnik, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: David Roochnik
  • Length: 12 hrs and 17 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 297
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 258
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 258

More than 2,500 years later, the fundamental questions asked by the ancient Greeks continue to challenge, fascinate, and instruct us. Is reality stable and permanent or is it always changing? Are ethical values like justice and courage relative? What is justice? What is happiness? How shall we best live our lives?In this series of 24 lectures, Professor Roochnik invites you to join this eternal discussion.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Prof. Roochnik is a ROCK STAR!

  • By A. M. on 08-23-14

Great.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-22-15

Like many of the courses in this series, it lives up to its name. It is great. The professor is top notch, and even though I have completed graduate work in philosophy I still learned a great deal. The learnings came from putting things in a larger perspective given this professor's immense background, and also learning A bit more about some of the thinkers with which I was already familiar.

13 of 14 people found this review helpful

  • The Modern Scholar: Giants of French Literature

  • Balzac, Flaubert, Proust, and Camus
  • By: Prof. Katherine Elkins
  • Narrated by: Katherine Elkins
  • Length: 8 hrs and 31 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 63
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 39
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 40

In this series of lectures, Professor Katherine Elkins details the lives and works of the premier French writers of the last two centuries. With keen insight into her subject material, Professor Elkins discusses the attributes that made classics of such works as Balzac's Human Comedy, Flaubert's Madame Bovary, Proust's In Search of Lost Time, and Camus' The Stranger.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The Modern Scholar: Giants of French Literature

  • By Dudley H. Williams on 11-29-11

Speaking of Proust, this takes me back

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-21-15

This takes me back to my finest learning experiences in college, and I was blessed with many both in the US and overseas.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful