LISTENER

Tenaya

  • 1
  • review
  • 0
  • helpful votes
  • 1
  • rating
  • Dragon Age: Asunder

  • Dragon Age, Book 3
  • By: David Gaider
  • Narrated by: Gildart Jackson
  • Length: 14 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 341
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 323
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 321

A mystical killer stalks the halls of the White Spire, the heart of templar power in the mighty Orlesian Empire. To prove his innocence, Rhys reluctantly embarks on a journey into the western wastelands that will not only reveal much more than he bargained for but change the fate of his fellow mages forever.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Great story brought down by the narrator

  • By Matthew Eaton on 06-27-16

A Story of Dehumanization

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-06-18

I came into the Dragon Age series with DA2, and was generally lost as to what was going on. I then played Inquisition, and was blown away by the quality of it's story, gameplay, soundtrack, and graphics. There was, however, one character who I easily found the most compelling, and that was Cole. Having read online that Asunder was the novel which canonically introduced Cole, I began listening to it on my morning walks to work. Suddenly, all of the ethical controversies and dilemmas discussed in DA2 were put into context. And I was horrified. I was horrified by the sanctioned, systemic cruelty depicted in the story against those born with magic, and particularly vulnerable to demonic predators. I was more horrified by the neutral position on this cruelty from the story's supposed heroes, and their condemnation of any characters willing to actively oppose that cruelty. The fascinating thing about this premise is that it engages readers and players with a wide span of real world views. Interpretations of the symbolism vary, and reactions are intensely polarized. Those who read the story through to its end will know that Cole was the most obviously dehumanized character, but he was far from alone.