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BRB

Jupiter, FL, United States
  • 17
  • reviews
  • 62
  • helpful votes
  • 21
  • ratings
  • Born a Crime

  • Stories from a South African Childhood
  • By: Trevor Noah
  • Narrated by: Trevor Noah
  • Length: 8 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 95,928
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 88,845
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 88,428

One of the comedy world's fastest-rising stars tells his wild coming of age story during the twilight of apartheid in South Africa and the tumultuous days of freedom that followed. Noah provides something deeper than traditional memoirists: powerfully funny observations about how farcical political and social systems play out in our lives.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great book and perfect narration

  • By Marilyn Armstrong on 12-15-16

Much more than just a funny guy!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-06-17

I bought this for a family trip, thinking that Trevor Noah is a funny guy on "The Daily Show" and that my husband and my college-age passenger would enjoy it. What a surprise! Noah has a warm, sad, funny, inspiring story about growing up a biracial child in South Africa under apartheid. After we arrived at our destination, we talked about the different stories he told and about how strange it is to "know" someone who had grown up in this alternate reality. I'd recommend it highly and plan to select it for my book club when it is my turn to host. It only goes up to his early 20s, so hope he does a sequel.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Americanah

  • By: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
  • Narrated by: Adjoa Andoh
  • Length: 17 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,228
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,489
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,468

As teenagers, Ifemelu and Obinze fall in love in a Nigeria under military dictatorship. The self-assured Ifemelu departs for America, where Obinze hopes to join her, but post-9/11 America will not let him in, and he plunges into a dangerous, undocumented life in London. Fifteen years later, after so long apart and so many changes, will they find the courage to meet again, face to face?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Dazzling, Romantic, and Witty

  • By Anna-Bo-Banana on 04-28-14

Transforming experience

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-16-16

The narrator spoke the English dialog in various African accents, making the reader understand the experience of young adults from Africa who come to the US on student visas. This book gives accounts of immigration experiences that few native Americans are aware of. These characters were so real. The reader can feel the frustration, the depression, the loneliness, the distance, the confusion . . . it is a very timely book with immigration being such a big political issue. I feel I walked a mile in the immigrants' footsteps. I highly recommend it.

  • A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms

  • A Song of Ice and Fire
  • By: George R. R. Martin
  • Narrated by: Harry Lloyd
  • Length: 10 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17,461
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,116
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,051

Taking place nearly a century before the events of A Game of Thrones, A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms compiles the first three official prequel novellas to George R. R. Martin's ongoing masterwork, A Song of Ice and Fire. Before Tyrion Lannister and Podrick Payne, there were Dunk and Egg. A young, naïve, but ultimately courageous hedge knight, Ser Duncan the Tall towers above his rivals - in stature if not experience. Tagging along is his diminutive squire, a boy called Egg - whose true name (hidden from all he and Dunk encounter) is Aegon Targaryen.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Martin is a genius

  • By Celeste Albers on 04-26-16

There is no whispering in audiobooks!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-16-16

The book was very well-done -- good writing, high adventure, humor, endearing characters, remorseless villains -- but my big complaint is that the narrator had a habit of whispering at key moments. If someone was thinking something, the narrator's voice would drop to a whisper. If two characters were speaking privately, whispers again. This is not good on audiobooks. We can't see the characters or read lips. And if the volume is not turned up high, we miss the whispered dialogue, which is often pivotal. I bought this to listen to on a trip with my teenage grandson, and we had to either have the volume turned up until it was almost painfully loud or else wind back to catch the whispered part. This really ruined a very good story. I bought the book to see what I missed.

  • Learning to Die in Miami

  • Confessions of a Refugee Boy
  • By: Carlos Eire
  • Narrated by: Robert Fass
  • Length: 12 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 37
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 31
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 31

Carlos Eire's story of a boyhood uprooted by the Cuban Revolution quickly lures us in, as eleven-year-old Carlos and his older brother Tony touch down in the sun-dappled Miami of 1962 - a place of daunting abundance where his old Cuban self must die to make way for a new, American self waiting to be born. In this enchanting new work, narrated in Eire's inimitable and lyrical voice, young Carlos adjusts to life in his new country.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A MUST READ BY ALL PEDRO PAN KIDS

  • By Terry on 07-28-12

Excellent memoir of a forgotten time in history

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-23-15

My book club read this book, thinking we would be familiar with the topic since we live in south Florida and have many friends and coworkers with Cuban roots, but this memoir told a different story than anything we had heard before. Sure, we had heard of the "Pedro Pan" airlift which "saved" lots of kids from Castro's Cuba, but this first-person account was nothing like the glib news releases we had heard years ago. The author tells about his experience as one of over 14,000 children, mostly boys, who were flown to Miami from Cuba between 1960 and 1962. Each was told that their parents would be following shortly afterwards, but in most cases, this was not possible. These kids relied on the kindness of distant relatives in the U.S., former friends or neighbors of their parents, and in one compelling part of this story, an unrelated Jewish family who could relate to losing one's home country. A loose network of social workers, foster parents, and church officials oversaw the welfare of the kids until the parents were able to join them some years later. Carlos Eire tells what it was like to be one of these children. He was 11 when he and his brother arrived in Miami, and this book describes his experience as he travels from one temporary home to another, trying to assimilate and make his way in this new world without much help from anyone. It is funny and sad, and a very honest account of how a preteen boy struggles into adulthood under these conditions. I enjoyed it thoroughly. Eire is a wonderful writer and Fass does a great job as narrator.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • David and Goliath

  • Underdogs, Misfits, and the Art of Battling Giants
  • By: Malcolm Gladwell
  • Narrated by: Malcolm Gladwell
  • Length: 7 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14,119
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,382
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,374

In David and Goliath, Malcolm Gladwell challenges how we think about obstacles and disadvantages, offering a new interpretation of what it means to be discriminated against, or cope with a disability, or lose a parent, or attend a mediocre school, or suffer from any number of other apparent setbacks. Gladwell begins with the real story of what happened between the giant and the shepherd boy those many years ago.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The Art of (Unconventional) War

  • By Cynthia on 10-04-13

Not Gladwell's best

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-12-14

I am a big Malcolm Gladwell fan, but I was a little disappointed by this book, both the content and the performance. I didn't find his arguments very compelling, for example the ascertain that dyslexia can produce success because, as kids, these people have had to try so hard to do everything. Sure there are a few outstanding people who have dyslexia, but what about those who aren't outstanding? His argument seems to be that "this works this way . . . unless it doesn't." Not as tight and well-argued as his previous books. His reading of the book is not so great -- it's like he isn't enjoying it very much either. I'm glad I bought it and listened to it, but I was expecting more.

  • Girl in Need of a Tourniquet

  • Memoir of a Borderline Personality
  • By: Merri Lisa Johnson
  • Narrated by: Erin Bennett
  • Length: 4 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 35
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 30
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 32

An honest and compelling memoir, Girl in Need of a Tourniquet is Merri Lisa Johnson’s account of her borderline personality disorder and how it has affected her life and relationships. Johnson describes the feeling of "bleeding out" unable to tell where she stopped and where her partner began. A self-confessed "psycho girlfriend," she was influenced by many emotional factors from her past. She recalls her path through a dysfunctional, destructive relationship, while recounting the experiences that brought her to her breaking point.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Not your typical mental illness memoir

  • By Luke K on 08-06-16

Chaotic, disturbing, meaningless

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-02-14

I am a professor of psychology and thought this would be informative and interesting, but I must be honest to say that I did not understand what was going on. I am not a clinician, but I do teach about personality and attachment. This was a stream of consciousness with little grounding in time or space. I guess that may been what the author was getting at, she does have a psychiatric disorder, but after an hour of listening, I realized I wasn't going to learn anything and was not going to be entertained. I gave up. Wish I could return it. If you want to read a good memoir of a person who is grappling with a mental health disorder, read Andrew Solomon's "The Noonday Demon." He is knowledgeable, a terrific writer, and gives a very compelling account of how depression affects all aspects of a person's life, but also the gifts one receives as a result of this struggle. The reader ends up admiring Solomon, liking him, and wanting to learn more about his life.

1 of 15 people found this review helpful

  • Five Days at Memorial

  • Life and Death in a Storm-Ravaged Hospital
  • By: Sheri Fink
  • Narrated by: Kirsten Potter
  • Length: 17 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,373
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,209
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,218

In the tradition of the best writing on medicine, physician and reporter Sheri Fink reconstructs five days at Memorial Medical Center and draws the listener into the lives of those who struggled mightily to survive and to maintain life amidst chaos. After Katrina struck and the floodwaters rose, the power failed, and the heat climbed, exhausted caregivers chose to designate certain patients last for rescue. Months later, several health professionals faced criminal allegations that they deliberately injected numerous patients with drugs to hasten their deaths. Five Days at Memorial, the culmination of six years of reporting, unspools the mystery of what happened in those days.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Must Read

  • By Sharon on 09-13-13

Unbelievable but True!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-18-14

I had heard about some court cases after Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans, pertaining to the possibility that some people were euthanized in hospitals and nursing homes. I didn't know the outcome. This author brings us the facts of this time -- five days -- after Katrina left and the city began flooding due to broken levees. She describes it day by day, using the words of the various people who were at the hospitals. I ended the book wondering what I would do in their shoes. It resulted in many conversations with nurses I know and adult children of nursing home patients. The last chapter describes new practices put into place for future natural disasters, but it left me slow to criticize what choices people make in critical situations.

  • The Goldfinch

  • By: Donna Tartt
  • Narrated by: David Pittu
  • Length: 32 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 25,094
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 22,789
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 22,814

The Goldfinch is a haunted odyssey through present-day America and a drama of enthralling force and acuity. It begins with a boy. Theo Decker, a 13-year-old New Yorker, miraculously survives an accident that kills his mother. Abandoned by his father, Theo is taken in by the family of a wealthy friend. Bewildered by his strange new home on Park Avenue, disturbed by schoolmates who don't know how to talk to him, and tormented above all by his unbearable longing for his mother, he clings to one thing that reminds him of her: a small, mysteriously captivating painting that ultimately draws Theo into the underworld of art.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wow

  • By kurdis teed on 05-28-17

Outstanding Book and Narrator

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-18-14

This was an excellent story that spans many years and many places, from the upper east side of New York to Las Vegas to Amsterdam. An adolescent boy experiences a life-changing tragedy and then stumbles into the world of art forgeries, antiques, drugs, blackmail, unconditional love, and the Russian mafia. Although none of these things especially interest me, I enjoyed the book a lot from the first sentence of the first page to the last. It is probably one of the best books I have listened to in the last 5 years. The narrator reads in a way that makes him actually disappear and lets the story just enter your brain. He does the accents of the rich private school kids, the Russian teenager, the bimbo girlfriend of his father, the Greenwich Village art restorer, and more, so well that you can picture them in your mind. I bought two copies of this book for gifts and recommended it to my book club.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Perfect

  • A Novel
  • By: Rachel Joyce
  • Narrated by: Paul Rhys
  • Length: 11 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 365
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 330
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 329

A spellbinding novel that will resonate with readers of Mark Haddon, Louise Erdrich, and John Irving, Perfect tells the story of a young boy who is thrown into the murky, difficult realities of the adult world with far-reaching consequences.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Touching and Fragile - Once Untangled.

  • By Amanda on 01-19-14

Perfect is Perfect!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-18-14

I enjoyed The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry by the same author and enjoyed this one even more. It is a story that starts small and then keeps moving, gathering strength as it goes along, until the very nice ending. There are little treats all along, like a character who refers to items by their brand names to make them seem special and separate from the other items in that category. The characters are very likable, even the antagonist. The narrator has a delightful British accent and reads it as if he is telling a story. I was sorry for it to end, and I wish Rachel Joyce had another book I could read.

10 of 12 people found this review helpful

  • The Little Friend

  • By: Donna Tartt
  • Narrated by: Karen White
  • Length: 25 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 809
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 679
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 681

From the author of The Secret History comes a dark, suspenseful novel of lost childhood. Harriet Dusfresnes is a child in Mississippi, haunted by the murder of her brother when she was just a baby. He was found hanging from a tree in their backyard; his killer was never identified, nor did the family ever recover. Only Harriet's teenage sister might have seen what happened that day, and she has blocked it out from her memory.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • The Little Friend's Friend

  • By Nathaniel on 08-14-10

Narrator distracts from the story

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-18-14

I just finished The Goldfinch and enjoyed it immensely, so thought I would enjoy The Little Friend. It is set in the south and the narrator has a very distracting southern accent. I am a southerner myself, but could not identify what the accent was supposed to be. But the worst part was that every sentence sounded like it had an exclamation point at the end(!) It was so artificial that I could not pay attention to the story. I quit after a few chapters and bought the hardcover book.

4 of 5 people found this review helpful