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Eve Howard

Las Vegas, Nevada
  • 20
  • reviews
  • 15
  • helpful votes
  • 27
  • ratings
  • Mr. American

  • By: George MacDonald Fraser
  • Narrated by: David Case
  • Length: 23 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 108
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 92
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 94

Mark Franklin came from the American West to Edwardian England with two long-barrelled .44s in his baggage and a fortune in silver in the bank. Where he had got it and what he was looking for no one could guess, although they wondered -- at Scotland Yard, in City offices, in the glittering theatreland of the West End, in the highest circles of Society (even King Edward was puzzled) and in the humble pub at Castle Lancing.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • WOW! WHAT A BOOK; WHAT A PERFORMANCE

  • By J. Jason on 05-20-13

Anyway, you'll meet Flashy one last time

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-27-18

Franklin reminded me of Sinclair Lewis' Dodson, if Dodson's back story was cowboy. There's a bit of Cranford thrown in (outsider does some fixing in the village), a bit of PG Wodehouse (Jeeves-like butler), a bit of Galsworthy and Waugh (portraying brittle society wives), a Gary Cooperish feel to the hero, with a dash of sketchy danger in his background, but the whole thing falls flat. It's neither amusing social satire or adventure, just a straight forward historical (pre-WWI) drama with bland dialog and two dimensional characters. In addition, for some unknown reason, to make his word count length perhaps, he reviews everything that has happened in the book, in mind deadening detail, three quarters through. Definitely not recommended to any but hardcore Flashman fans, who want to see him tottering around London causing trouble to the extent that he still can, at age 92.

  • Peter the Great

  • His Life and World
  • By: Robert K. Massie
  • Narrated by: Frederick Davidson
  • Length: 43 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 763
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 645
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 635

This superbly told story brings to life one of the most remarkable rulers––and men––in all of history and conveys the drama of his life and world. The Russia of Peter's birth was very different from the Russia his energy, genius, and ruthlessness shaped. Crowned co-Tsar as a child of ten, after witnessing bloody uprisings in the streets of Moscow, he would grow up propelled by an unquenchable curiosity, everywhere looking, asking, tinkering, and learning, fired by Western ideas.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Very good

  • By Adam on 10-26-11

Superb textbook that reads like a novel

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-07-18

It's not just Peter's history, this fantastic book fills in the background of every important monarch in Europe in the early 18th Century. A must for Russian literature fans, it sets the stage for all the upheavals to come. If you want to know what is meant by that vague phrase, the Russian soul, Peter's life and struggles will explain that too. The book is crammed with major events, social trends, commercial enterprises, international diplomacy, embassies, inventions, institutions, characters, and above all, war, war, war. Monster or visionary? Both in abundance. You wouldn't want to be part of his family, but after experiencing all he went through, all he wrought and all he tried to do, you become almost emotionally attached to this unique individual. The perfect companion to a library filled with Tolstoy, Dostoyevsky, Pushin and Gogol.

  • The Metamorphoses

  • By: Ovid
  • Narrated by: Charlton Griffin
  • Length: 16 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 379
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 245
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 244

An undeniable masterpiece of Western Civilization, The Metamorphoses is a continuous narrative that covers all the Olympian legends, seamlessly moving from one story to another in a splendid panorama of savage beauty, charm, and wit. All of the gods and heroes familiar to us are represented. Such familiar legends as Hercules, Perseus and Medusa, Daedelus and Icarus, Diana and Actaeon, and many others, are breathtakingly recreated.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Charlton Griffin's Metamorphoses

  • By Coach of Alva on 01-23-14

The Best of the Best

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-07-18

This is the version of the Greek myths that stuck, and for good reason. It's a delight and a wonder. It reads like a novel, feels like a romance, is full of anthropological surprises, defines nature, and introduces psychology, all against a backdrop of monumental action. Charlton Griffin is a masterful reader, who dramatizes these fabulous stories to perfection. The cataclysmic descriptions of creation, chaos, war and love, unfold like the most elaborately graphic CGI effects in the most spectacular epic ever filmed, that's how vivid this book is, with respect to the physical and supernatural world. As for the gods and goddesses - here's where the battle of the sexes began. In short, this Roman classic, penned by the poet who survived the reigns of Augustus, Tiberius and Claudius - but not Nero, is a jewel for the ages.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Flashman and the Seawolf

  • Adventures of Thomas Flashman
  • By: Robert Brightwell
  • Narrated by: Henry Clore Harrison
  • Length: 7 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 48
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 47
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 47

This book introduces Thomas Flashman, whose career covers the Napoleonic and Georgian era. This first book covers his adventures with Thomas Cochrane, one of the most extraordinary naval commanders of all time. From the brothels and gambling dens of London, through political intrigues and espionage, the action moves to the Mediterranean and the real life character of Thomas Cochrane.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Great Historical Novel

  • By Jean on 09-20-17

Not a Flashman book in any sense

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-07-18

Got most of the way through this one and realized, it's dull and I'm really not learning anything either. Let's face it, it isn't possible to clone genius or wit. To execute a true pastiche of a great writer's style, is a huge talent; to combine that with an exciting and original plot line requires even great abilities. I know of no sequels or prequels by imitative writers that ever brought me any personal joy. The Bond books are labored and no fun, and just the thought of imitation Austens makes me shudder. If you're a true GMF admirer, don't even go here, you'll only be bored.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Mrs. Budley Falls from Grace

  • The Poor Relation, Book 3
  • By: M. C. Beaton
  • Narrated by: Davina Poter
  • Length: 5 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 762
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 697
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 692

Eliza Budley is a beautiful widow whose husband gambled away his fortune. Lady Fortescue reminds the others that, to be fair, Mrs. Budley has no relatives on whom she can call. Gentle Mrs. Budley thinks she has escaped her fate until Sir Philip comes up with a plan: He has heard that the elderly Marquess of Peterhouse is senile, a widower, extremely rich, and unlikely to remember whether Mrs. Budley is a relative or not. So off Mrs. Budley goes. But the marquess turns out to be not so old, hardly senile, and, in fact, quite handsome.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • good series, but predictable

  • By Marie on 03-29-13

Dear Mrs. Budley lands her aristocrat!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-07-18

Sort of a mixture of Austen and Dickens, Beaton's conceit in this series is a fashionable hotel run by a group of shabby genteel folk, who pool their resources to create a business that supports them all and opens up opportunities for romance, regency style. By book 3 we realize that each and every one of the unmarried poor relations is going to end up securely settled with a proper mate, and I for one, enjoy the lack of uncertainty about these highly likable characters. I will most certainly finish the entire series, which the brilliant Davina Porter renders a delight.

  • Flashman and the Angel of the Lord

  • By: George MacDonald Fraser
  • Narrated by: David Case
  • Length: 13 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 108
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 88
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 86

If only Flashman had got on with his dinner and ignored the handkerchief dropped by a flirtatious hussy in a Calcutta hotel... well, American history might have been different, a disastrous civil war might have been avoided, and Flash Harry himself would have been spared one of the most hair-raising adventures of his misspent life. If only... but alas, the arch-rotter of the Victorian age could never resist the lure of a pretty foot.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • David Case reads excellent as Flashman

  • By Rusty G SATX on 03-22-12

Another stateside adventure for Flashman

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-07-18

In this volume, Flashy works for both the Abolitionists and the Klan, against his will, of course, because he has no choice. Once again, you can blame John Charity Spring, for shanghaiing Flashman back to the states, on the very eve of the Civil War. John Brown's rebellion is the backdrop to this assignment and some familiar characters from past adventures show up to play a part. Another terrific romp, with lots of sex and intrigue to propel the action. Catnip to Flashy fans. And brilliantly performed by David Case, who was born to be Flashman. This one starts with the narrator in his 90's, surrounded by his great grandchildren on Elspeth's lavish estate. Total joy.

  • Lady Fortescue Steps Out

  • The Poor Relation, Book 1
  • By: M. C. Beaton
  • Narrated by: Davina Porter
  • Length: 4 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,737
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,469
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,471

Life is not easy for the poor relations of England’s upper crust, but fate and clever schemes bring them together. Lady Fortescue and Colonel Sandhurst hatch a plan: What if they were to transform her decrepit Bond Street home into a posh hotel, offering their guests the pleasure of being waited upon by nobility? With the help of other down-and-out aristocrats, they do just that, and London’s newest hotel, The Poor Relation, is born. The establishment is an immediate hit with London’s most illustrious citizens, save the Duke of Rowcester....

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Charming Regency Fun - Romance & Adventure

  • By Clare on 05-04-12

Georgette Heyer fans - look here!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-17-18

A bit of Austen, a dash of Fanny Burney, a generous helping of Georgette Heyer and a fine overshadowing of Dickens, are swirled around into a froth and charmingly presented by M.C. Beaton. This lady has a nice sense of humor, good pacing, dialog that is well wrought, engaging characters. Suffice to say, I'm already on book two of The Poor Relations. Should mention that the reading, by the brilliant Davina Porter, elevates the whole to a theatrical level of excellence.

  • Royal Flash

  • Flashman, Book 2
  • By: George MacDonald Fraser
  • Narrated by: David Case
  • Length: 9 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 224
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 201
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 205

In this volume of The Flashman Papers, Flashman, the arch-cad and toady, matches his wits, his talents for deceit and malice, and above all his speed in evasion against the most brilliant European statesman and against the most beauiful and unscrupulous adventuress of the era. From London gaming-halls and English hunting-fields to European dungeons and throne-rooms, he is involved in a desperate succession of escapes, disguises, amours and (when he cannot avoid them) hand-to-hand combats. All the while, the destiny of a continent rests on his broad and failing shoulders.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Humor, adventure, history..<br />

  • By TheNoisyLibrarian on 10-18-17

Prisoner of Zenda send up

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-23-18

David Case was born to be Flashman, he reads these books with such nuance, panache and superb comic timing. Satire, adventure, swashbuckle, history, the Flashman books are a composite of all these things, based on the conceit that the bully, coward and womanizer, Flashman, (the despicable character from Tom Brown's School Days), became a career soldier and subsequent hero, many times over, as revealed in the Flashman papers. There are no other books quite like these. Highly recommended to everyone who loves classic English novels and black humor.

  • Resurrection

  • By: Leo Tolstoy
  • Narrated by: Simon Vance
  • Length: 16 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 104
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 69
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 67

Tolstoy based Resurrection, the last of his novels, on a true story of a philanderer whose misuse of a beautiful young orphan girl leads to her ruin. Fate brings the two together many years later, and the meeting awakens the man's moral conscience. Anger, intimacy, forgiveness, and grace result.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Vance is Wonderful!

  • By C. Davis on 09-26-09

The book that got Tolstoy excommunicated

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-26-17

What a magnificent, beautiful, touching and sobering book. It has left me with a sense of disquiet though. So many of the terrible things that T. observed about society’s manner of administering criminal “justice” and also brutalizing the poor, while keeping the rich firmly entrenched and complacently indifferent, are still firmly in place and in many cases, worse than ever before...right here in America. This brings great sadness. What a very modern book it was, in so many ways. What he saw left him broken hearted, but what he would have seen had he lived another few decades more - possibly would have driven him mad.
I realize now that the religious journey one must go on if one reads T., is a logical progression of steps, leading to the ultimate conclusions that he reached in this book. It is heartening that he finally realized the nonsensical emptiness of the religious rituals that had once filled him with such nostalgia, embracing a simpler and more honest truth.
In this book, Tolstoy exposes the criminal &quot;justice&quot; system, as Prince N. follows Maslova, the girl he ruined twelve years before, to a prison in Siberia, to which she has been sentenced to four years hard labor. On the journey he meets various criminal and political prisoners, who help to form within him, a new point of view about society, the law, and Christianity itself.
The novel is deep, harsh and unsparing, but also extremely poetical and humanistic, with Tolsoy's characteristic mastery of cinematic description lighting up the journey from start to finish. If you ever wondered why there really was a series of Russian revolutions that changed the course of European and world history, this novel explains it all very well.
This book stays with one, provoking thoughts and emotions and endless admiration for this intellectual giant.

  • Flashman and the Redskins

  • Flashman, Book 7
  • By: George MacDonald Fraser
  • Narrated by: David Case
  • Length: 17 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 142
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 122
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 122

The seventh volume of the Flashman Papers records the arch-cad's adventures in America during Gold Rush of 1849 and the Battle of Bighorn, in 1876. This installment describes his acquaintance with famous Indian chiefs, American soldiers, frontiersmen, and statesmen.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Usual Flashman, not the best

  • By James on 01-21-15

Stateside Flashy, at Little Big Horn

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-04-17

Another rollicking adventure, split into two eras, twenty years apart. Flashman evades capture in New Orleans by hooking up with an English Madam, who leads him west to follow the gold rush to California. He never quite gets to CA., but manages to get captured by the Sioux and spends six months in an Indian village with an Indian wife. Twenty years later, he's back in the US with Elspeth and being led astray by a beauty with an eyepatch, winds up out west again, in the clutches of a wronged old flame, and then, as a participant and witness to the Little Big Horn skirmish. Wonderful action, precise historical detail and of course, the inimitable Flashy humor and cynicism, counterbalanced by enough honest humanity to make him the most likable of rogues. A joy for Flashy fans. David Case, aka Frederick Davidson, is the consummate Flashman.