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Daniel Julien

Austin, TX USA
  • 2
  • reviews
  • 7
  • helpful votes
  • 42
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  • The Language of Houses

  • By: Alison Lurie
  • Narrated by: Nancy Linari
  • Length: 10 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars 12
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 11
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars 11

The Language of Clothes came to be highly regarded in the literature of couture and design. Lurie has returned with The Language of Houses, a provocative and entertaining journey through the architecture of houses and buildings and the divided spaces within come to reflect the attitudes and purposes of the organizations and people who inhabit them.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Disappointing to say the least

  • By LGLH on 10-14-14

Meandering and frivolous

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-31-14

This book seems to be a series of statements and assertions about buildings following one another in a stream-of-consciousness fashion, loosely organized under chapter and section headings.I kept wondering "What is the point?" The assertions are just made, not supported by argument. I kept wondering "Where did she get that from?" The narrator did well enough. I did not enjoy reading this, and overall thought it a waste of a credit.

  • Merchants of Doubt

  • How a Handful of Scientists Obscured the Truth on Issues from Tobacco Smoke to Global Warming
  • By: Erik M. Conway, Naomi Oreskes
  • Narrated by: Peter Johnson
  • Length: 13 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 670
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 557
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 552

The U.S. scientific community has long led the world in research on such areas as public health, environmental science, and issues affecting quality of life. Our scientists have produced landmark studies on the dangers of DDT, tobacco smoke, acid rain, and global warming. But at the same time, a small yet potent subset of this community leads the world in vehement denial of these dangers.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Valuable scholarship, but not exactly literature

  • By Roger on 01-23-11

Interesting story mired in detail

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-14-12

This is an interesting book, but mired in detail and hampered by the reader. The writers' case (contrary to some reviewers) is amply supported by evidence. However, the level of detail detracts from the narrative flow. I think the arguments would have been easier to follow if presented more briefly, with the supporting detail moved to an appendix, where the interested reader could turn for more detail if desired.

The narrator spoke very clearly, but his phrasing was poor, with many pauses that had nothing to do with the sentence structure. A more animated tone and better flow would have helped immensely.

7 of 9 people found this review helpful