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Bryanoutside

  • 7
  • reviews
  • 10
  • helpful votes
  • 46
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  • The Art of the Argument

  • Western Civilization's Last Stand
  • By: Stefan Molyneux
  • Narrated by: Stefan Molyneux
  • Length: 5 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 851
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 798
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 787

The Art of the Argument shocks the dying art of rational debate back to life, giving you the essential tools you need to fight the escalating sophistry, falsehoods, and vicious personal attacks that have displaced intelligent conversations throughout the world. At a time when we need reasonable and empirical discussions more desperately than ever, The Art of the Argument smashes through the brain-eating fogs of sophistry and mental manipulation, illuminating a path to benevolent power for all who wish to take it.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Too bad

  • By Jason on 09-11-18

False Premises Included

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-07-19

This book was long on social commentary and baseless right wing claims, which were completely unnecessary for the book. Don’t waste your time, this will not teach how to improve your arguments.

5 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • Kluge

  • The Haphazard Construction of the Human Mind
  • By: Gary Marcus
  • Narrated by: Stephen Hoye
  • Length: 6 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 151
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 60
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 61

Are we "noble in reason"? Perfect, in God's image? Far from it, says New York University psychologist Gary Marcus. In this lucid and revealing book, Marcus argues that the mind is not an elegantly designed organ but a "kluge", a clumsy, cobbled-together contraption. He unveils a fundamentally new way of looking at the human mind - think duct tape, not supercomputer - that sheds light on some of the most mysterious aspects of human nature.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Elegant

  • By Joshua Kim on 06-10-12

Mandatory Reading

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-21-18

A great overview to the challenges we face as thinking creatures. A totally delightful listen.

  • Political Tribes

  • Group Instinct and the Fate of Nations
  • By: Amy Chua
  • Narrated by: Julia Whelan
  • Length: 7 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 467
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 423
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 415

Humans are tribal. We need to belong to groups. In many parts of the world, the group identities that matter most - the ones that people will kill and die for - are ethnic, religious, sectarian, or clan-based. But because America tends to see the world in terms of nation-states engaged in great ideological battles - capitalism vs. communism, democracy vs. authoritarianism, the "free world" vs. the "axis of evil" - we are often spectacularly blind to the power of tribal politics. Time and again this blindness has undermined American foreign policy.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Revelatory.

  • By Bryanoutside on 03-15-18

Revelatory.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-15-18

In light of the 2016 election, I have really struggled to make sense of the emerging extremes within American society. I have spent the last year and a half consuming all the literature I can on evolutionary psychology and tribalism and been inundated with information to the point that it has become hard to articulate much with clarity. This book however does a wonderful job weaving a simple narrative that explains what is gnawing at the American soul. Amy Chua has done a wonderful job presenting concrete examples with a strong scientific foundation in a practical way that everyone can understand. If you care or are concerned at all about the state of the United States, I highly recommend this book, it was an insightful and thoroughly enjoyable read.

5 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • Payoff

  • The Hidden Logic That Shapes Our Motivations
  • By: Dan Ariely
  • Narrated by: Simon Jones
  • Length: 2 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 795
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 693
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 684

Every day we work hard to motivate ourselves, the people we live with, the people who work for and do business with us. In this way much of what we do can be defined as being motivators. From the boardroom to the living room, our role as motivators is complex, and the more we try to motivate partners and children, friends and coworkers, the clearer it becomes that the story of motivation is far more intricate and fascinating than we've assumed.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Love Ariely, but rehash of old stories

  • By Scott on 12-16-16

A brilliant little book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-17-18

The trick with these short books is to be entertaining, have something worth saying and to not repeat yourself. Dan Ariely did a superb job of this. This some shallow self-help kick in the pants but an in-depth look at motivation that is easily digestible for the lay person. Simon Jones also does an impressive job at narration. Having listened to 25 days worth of audiobooks this year alone, this narrator is about as good as it gets.

  • The Selfish Gene

  • By: Richard Dawkins
  • Narrated by: Richard Dawkins, Lalla Ward
  • Length: 16 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,333
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,434
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,367

Richard Dawkins' brilliant reformulation of the theory of natural selection has the rare distinction of having provoked as much excitement and interest outside the scientific community as within it. His theories have helped change the whole nature of the study of social biology, and have forced thousands to rethink their beliefs about life.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Long, but explanitory

  • By William on 03-02-13

Excellent book poor edition

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-15-18

As longstanding fan of Dawkins, I was really excited to finally get into this classic work. What was extremely problematic was the structure of the book bouncing between the original work and the revisions, especially with two different narrators. It was a major distraction and made this a labor as opposed to a joy.

  • On Human Nature: Revised Edition

  • By: Edward O. Wilson
  • Narrated by: Joe Barrett
  • Length: 7 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 202
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 144
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 144

This revised edition of Human Nature begins a new phase in the most important intellectual controversy of this generation: Is human behavior controlled by the species' biological heritage? Does this heritage limit human destiny?

With characteristic pungency and simplicity of style, the author of Sociobiology challenges old prejudices and current misconceptions about the nature-nurture debate.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Heralding Voice...

  • By Douglas on 07-22-14

Timeless in its relevance to human nature.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-16-17

An utterly fascinating book! Do not for a second let the age of this text inhibit you from reading it.

  • Meeting at Grand Central

  • Understanding the Social and Evolutionary Roots of Cooperation
  • By: Lee Cronk, Beth L. Leech.
  • Narrated by: Claire Christie
  • Length: 10 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 5
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5

From the family to the workplace to the marketplace, every facet of our lives is shaped by cooperative interactions. Yet everywhere we look, we are confronted by proof of how difficult cooperation can be - snarled traffic, polarized politics, overexploited resources, social problems that go ignored. The benefits to oneself of a free ride on the efforts of others mean that collective goals often are not met. But compared to most other species, people actually cooperate a great deal. Why is this?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliant -- so many "aha" moments

  • By Philo on 02-14-13

Could have been much better

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-19-17

Good information, poor structure and bland writing style. This is essentially a college text book and reads like it. Skip the first and last chapter and it will probably be more enjoyable.