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Bonnie-Ann

Norristown, PA, United States
  • 24
  • reviews
  • 329
  • helpful votes
  • 30
  • ratings
  • 48 Hours

  • By: William R. Forstchen
  • Narrated by: Bronson Pinchot
  • Length: 11 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 666
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 638
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 635

In 48 hours, the Earth will be hit by a coronal mass ejection (CME) from the sun, a "Carrington Event" that has the power to shut down and possibly destroy the world's electrical infrastructure. To try and prevent permanent damage, everything goes dark prior to the hit: Global communications are shut down; hospital emergency generators are disconnected; the entire internet, media broadcasting, and cell phone systems are turned off. Will the world's population successfully defend itself in the wake of the CME, or will mass panic lead to the breakdown of society as we know it?

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Not a typical Forstchen book

  • By Preparing4SHTF on 01-16-19

Narration destroyed the book

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-23-19

I am a huge fan of William Forstchen’s “One Second After” series. I absolutely loved “48 Hours” as to the story as well. Very few SHTF authors understand the moral (NOT religious) dilemmas better nor do many authors create just the right mix of practical descriptions of weapons, food supplies and other details. The book is great.

Read it — on paper, on Kindle, whatever your preference as to absorbing a book. Have someone else besides the narrator read it to you if you want to hear the book as opposed to physically reading it. The whispers and the growls and the lowering and raising of the volume were atrocious. It was difficult for me to understand half of the book because the sound quality was so poor; particularly when combined with the overly dramatic reading. It wasn’t just a problem while driving — I was sitting and knitting while listening and constantly had to rewind and change the volume so I could understand what was being said. I am sure this narrator has read other books I have listened to, but THIS book was bad.

And I say that despite a overall strong review. The story is great and every narrator can have a bad book. Hopefully, Audible will re-record this one because I’d like to listen to it again without all the fake Missouri accented screaming, grunting and whispers. I have never given a narrator a one star rating. I want to think this was just poorly engineered.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Vengeance

  • By: Newt Gingrich, Pete Earley
  • Narrated by: Eric Martin
  • Length: 13 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 402
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 370
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 367

A terrorist drives an explosive-packed rental truck into Major Brooke Grant's Washington, DC wedding, intending to detonate a deadly bomb. Saved by a last-minute fluke, Brooke seeks revenge against the master terrorist responsible, an international radical Islamist known only as the Falcon, who is determined to murder her, bring America to its knees, and create a modern-day caliphate.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • This book gets a DOUBLE WOW!!!!

  • By shelley on 03-31-18

Almost great

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-17-19

I thoroughly enjoyed this third book in the Brooke Grant series and would have given it a five star rating but for the 20+ minutes of Bible study thrown in at the end. It is not Christian fiction; it’s the story of how a young woman comes to grips with being a terrorist’s personal target.

The morality questions raised were excellent. The characters were strongly written. I hope Speaker Gingrich continues the storyline; perhaps with additional focus on what happened after what should have been the major event (not putting spoilers in).

  • The Taming of the Queen

  • By: Philippa Gregory
  • Narrated by: Bianca Amato
  • Length: 18 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,992
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,824
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,812

Kateryn Parr, a 30-year-old widow in a secret affair with a new lover, has no choice when a man old enough to be her father who has buried four wives - King Henry VIII - commands her to marry him.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • You'd better like repetition

  • By A customer on 09-17-15

Not the worst Gregory book ever

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-10-15

No, that title is still held by "The White Queen," if only barely. I always hope that Ms. Gregory will return to her early habits of less repetitive phrasing and solid history. Even when I didn't love a few of the earlier novels (specifically "The Red Queen"), I could listen to them without talking back to the narrator. But alas, Ms. Gregory again felt the need with this story to take a fascinating character from a fascinating time period and to make the person unlikable.

And that is where I had my own revelation while listening to this book: Ms. Gregory doesn't like her own characters anymore; she uses them to make her own points but she dislikes them. Katherine Parr was a true Renaissance woman -- she was a scholar and a romantic and a loving stepmother to not only the Tudor royal children but to children of her other marriages. She wrote and translated and helped change England from a medieval country to a much more enlightened one. She was unquestionably a significant early influence on Elizabeth I during her young adult years. She was a really interesting woman and that is with very little information on her as a person in historical records.

But not to Ms. Gregory. Ms. Gregory has a point to make in your face over and over ad nauseum. To Ms. Gregory, Katherine Parr was just another victim of the "wife killer," Henry VIII (from the author's note). The character is written as a reluctant reformer who spends half her life afraid and the other half whining about being afraid. She also spends time performing sexual acts on a dying king which is an area of writing that Ms. Gregory should absolutely avoid -- she doesn't write it well at all. There are a very few brief mentions of the relationships between Parr and the Tudor children, but there was a vast amount more that could have been written if a novelist truly wanted to study this person and the times in which she lived.

It also gets a bit old to hear/read Ms. Gregory's perspective on the Catholic faith. There has never been any question in reading her prior novels that she is not Catholic, but this particular novel spits venom at the Catholic Church on an epic scale. Ms. Gregory seems to be linking her hatred of Henry VIII with a hatred of the Catholic Church that has not been in her prior works. Between the poorly written sex scenes, the constant whining about Katherine Parr's interrupted love of Thomas Seymour (and how much she wants to have sex with him), the self-righteous dialogue about religion and the avoidance of any real substance, the only reason that I gave this novel two stars is because it wasn't AS bad as "The White Queen" and the phrases weren't quite as repetitive.

I find Katherine Parr to be a fascinating woman and I had real hopes for this novel. Instead, it was more of the same "Henry VIII was awful and women's lives were awful and Catholic beliefs are stupid." Such a waste.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Full Force and Effect

  • A Jack Ryan Novel
  • By: Mark Greaney
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick
  • Length: 19 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,490
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,778
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,748

A North Korean ICBM crashes into the Sea of Japan. A veteran CIA officer is murdered in Ho Chi Minh City, and a package of forged documents goes missing. The pieces are there, but assembling the puzzle will cost Jack Ryan, Jr., and his fellow Campus agents precious time. Time they don't have.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Thank You Mark Greaney!

  • By Chris C on 12-10-14

Glad the characters are still around

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-10-14

I really hesitated in writing this review. First of all, I am THRILLED that Mark Greaney is continuing the late great Tom Clancy's storytelling and I ALMOST gave the story a five star. Almost. I have been reading these stories for decades and, although I know the last few were co-written, I have remained loyal to the series. Mr. Greaney did a wonderful job as far as he went.

My critique of Scott Brick is not new. I realize he is everyone's favorite narrator. He is not mine. I would have preferred that Lou Diamond Phillips remain my storyteller. Scott Brick's voice irritates me -- not AS much in this book as in some others. However, I have never listened to someone who is more in love with his own voice. Every word is drawn out and too emotional. I think three stars is probably the highest rating I have given to Mr. Brick in quite some time so that's actually a positive rating from me.

My SOLE critique of this novel is the virtual lack of existence of Cathy Ryan and the other Ryan kids. I realize that, several years ago, a decision was made to follow Jack Junior's escapades (and I love Jack Jr. !!). I was hopeful that with quite a bit of focus back onto President Jack Ryan, that more attention would come back to Dr. Cathy and the other kids. Maybe in the next book, the whole Ryan family can be better represented. It's the all-American family who become major political figures that truly made the Jack Ryan series so wonderful. I can (and do) read hundreds of thrillers, but there is something about THIS First Family that makes me want to know all the details of their lives. My favorite book to date is still "Executive Orders" because it explores the relationships and isn't just about the thriller/action portion.

Other than those very minor comments, "Full Force and Effect" is spectacular. I wouldn't change anything about the story -- not a single detail -- I would just have added a little more. I love the story and the premise and the characters. I love the "ripped from the headlines" feeling with North Korea acting like the criminals that they are and the subtext of Russia getting frisky. I love that President Ryan was again a player in this story. It's a great novel. Both my overall rating and story rating are actually 4.5 stars.

13 of 17 people found this review helpful

  • The Lincoln Myth

  • A Novel
  • By: Steve Berry
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick
  • Length: 14 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,173
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,058
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,056

New York Times best-selling author Steve Berry returns with his latest thriller, a Cotton Malone adventure involving a flaw in the United States Constitution, a mystery about Abraham Lincoln, and a political issue that’s as explosive as it is timely - not only in Malone’s world, but in ours. September 1861: All is not as it seems. With these cryptic words, a shocking secret passed down from president to president comes to rest in the hands of Abraham Lincoln.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • The title made the book sound interesting to me

  • By BklynBabe on 06-19-14

Fascinating window into a different world

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-24-14

Any book that starts with the historically-accurate analysis that the Civil War was NOT all about slavery is going to get my attention fast. Period. This novel, which outlines a deal made between President Lincoln and the Mormons was believable, attention-grabbing and just plain wonderful.

Great novel, great characters, amazing blend of fact and fiction. And I learned about something new (in this case, the Mormon religion) which is always my favorite part of a Berry novel. I downloaded. I listened. I'll listen again. Very few authors have the ability to earn a second listen -- Steve Berry is one of those authors. .

Well done. Very well done!!!

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Dead Eye

  • A Gray Man Novel
  • By: Mark Greaney
  • Narrated by: Jay Snyder
  • Length: 14 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,709
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,914
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,936

Ex-CIA master assassin Court Gentry has always prided himself on his ability to disappear at will, to fly below the radar and exist in the shadows - to survive as the near-mythical Gray Man. But when he takes revenge upon a former employer who betrayed him, he exposes himself to something he’s never had to face before. A killer who is just like him. Code-named Dead Eye, Russell Whitlock is a graduate of the same ultra-secret Autonomous Asset Program that trained and once controlled Gentry.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fits well into the series

  • By Julius Butcher on 12-16-13

Best story so far

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-18-14

Court Gentry is a hero who everyone wants to make a villain. In this most recent novel, it is made more clear that he is being targeted by people high up in the US government for all the wrong reasons. We've always know that as readers, but this novel makes it very clear that Court is a victim of someone, somewhere, who wants him dead.

The action is continuous. The storytelling is excellent. I was not 100% thrilled with the narration, but not enough to downgrade my overall score. I strongly suggest starting at the beginning of the series -- "The Gray Man" -- in order to understand Court's character.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Blood Between Queens

  • By: Barbara Kyle
  • Narrated by: Barbara Kyle
  • Length: 15 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 19
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 19
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 19

Following her perilous fall from a throne she'd scarcely owned to begin with, Mary, Queen of Scots, has fled to England, hoping her cousin, Elizabeth, will grant her asylum. But now Mary has her sights on the English crown, and Elizabeth enlists her most trusted subjects to protect it. Justine Thornleigh is delighting in the thrill of Queen Elizabeth's visit to her family's estate when the festivities are cut short by Mary's arrival. To Justine's surprise, the Thornleighs appoint her to serve as a spy in Mary's court. But bearing the guise of a lady-in-waiting is not Justine's only secret.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Love it Enjoyed. the story

  • By Anonymous User on 01-21-18

A flair for the dramatic (and not in a good way)

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-07-14

First of all, most of this review applies to all five of the books in the Thornleigh series. Since I have now wasted my time on all five books, I am merely going to make slight adjustments to each review so as to protect others from wading through them as I did. If it hadn't been the "slump" period for new novels -- between mid-January and mid-June when no awesome new books are released -- I wouldn't have gotten through the first of these books, let alone all five of them. However, I spend hours every day waiting at my kids' activities and I use that time to listen to books and knit. So I drowned myself in Barbara Kyle. After the first few hours, it almost became like watching a train wreck -- you just have to keep going. I also believe in giving authors EVERY benefit of the doubt.

This is the fifth and final book (currently) in the series of the Thornleigh family. The historical time frame is mid-16th century England and the Elizabeth and Mary saga. I always acknowledge that history is written by the winners so I get it: Elizabeth is good, Mary is bad. As the author correctly acknowledges at the end of the novel, the Casket Letters which were allegedly written by Mary, Queen of Scots, have not survived to be examined. The ONLY reason I am giving this novel two stars on the story is because Ms. Kyle gets the piece about the Casket Letters right and explains that the Scottish Lords suddenly resented these letters and their authenticity was very questionable. Other than that one part that few authors acknowledge, the story is ridiculous.

The entire series, without spoilers, tracks the fictional Thornleigh and the Grenville families as feuding throughout Tudor history. Book One is the beginnings of the Protestant reformation. Book Two is early Bloody Mary and the Wyatt Rebellion. Book Three is Elizabeth's captivity under her sister, Mary. Book Four is Elizabeth's early reign and the French/Catholic threat from Scotland. Book Five is supposed to be the rivalry between the two queens. In each and every book, a Thornleigh woman gets herself into unnecessary trouble, there a long and loving description of the penalty for treason (which some character or another has invariably committed) and some sort of rationale given for why the heroine of each book hates herself until she is saved by love from self-loathing and guilt. There is also a very anti-Catholic tone to all of these novels which I just accepted although it was disturbing.

Yes, it is JUST that bad, All five books are JUST that bad. These women think far too highly of their own responsibility in matters of world affairs. Then, when they take action (or don't take action), the author spends the next several chapters of dialogue with that woman berating herself about the choice she made and worrying about the consequences of that choice. And the worst part is that these women make DUMB choices -- it is a very sad literary day when I WANT the heroine to get burned at the stake or think that it would serve a heroine right if her fiance died of wounds because he had to come chasing after her. These women are not strong fighters for the Protestant/Elizabethan cause. They are constant whiners who get themselves into silly situations. They certainly don't think things through before jumping into action for their causes.The books are a never ending series of "let me see how much trouble I can get into and then let me whine about it and then let me apologize to the man I love and live happily ever after." Yes, it is JUST that bad.

And authors should not ever EVER narrate their own novels. Ms. Kyle's voice is very nice and I would enjoy listening to her narrate a novel that she had not written. However, she loves her own words too much and adores her very unlikeable characters. Every word is drawled out lovingly and a heavy emotional emphasis is placed on the dialogue. I don't know if I would have disliked the books quite as much if someone else had been reading them. I know that her voice became so grating to me by the third book that I was talking BACK to the book and I was doing so out loud. When I heard "Justine knew she couldn't just leave...," I literally said "Of COURSE she couldn't jut leave. That's what a practical person would do."

After which, I promised my husband that I would be done soon and that I would not listen to anymore more books in the series.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Blood Gospel

  • The Order of the Sanguines, Book 1
  • By: James Rollins, Rebecca Cantrell
  • Narrated by: Christian Baskous
  • Length: 17 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 958
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 850
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 858

An earthquake in Masada, Israel, kills hundreds and reveals a tomb buried in the heart of the mountain. A trio of investigators - Sergeant Jordan Stone, a military forensic expert; Father Rhun Korza, a Vatican priest; and Dr. Erin Granger, a brilliant but disillusioned archaeologist - are sent to explore the macabre discovery, a subterranean temple holding the crucified body of a mummified girl. But a brutal attack at the site sets the three on the run, thrusting them into a race to recover what was once preserved in the tomb's sarcophagus: a book rumored to have been written by Christ's own hand....

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Surprising Disappointment

  • By Jean on 01-15-13

Absolutely stellar

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-28-14

I love James Rollins's Sigma Force novels but was very hesitant to read/listen to this story because many times co-written books are choppy. That can be ok if reading, but when listening, it can be very disturbing to hear two different writing styles. This novel was seamless. It was as near to a perfect novel as I have ever read.

I was finally swayed when my husband said that I "must read" this novel. My husband despises vampire fiction (although he loves James Rollins). He was up reading the Kindle version well into the night for several evenings. So I downloaded it onto my iPod and turned it on. And was hooked from the first five minutes. I became anti-social because people were disturbing my reading/listening time. It took me less than three days to listen to this novel; all while working and taking care of busy kids' schedules.

I won't do spoilers because I go out of my way not to do so, but the main theme behind this book mixes the history of the Roman Catholic Church with that Eastern Europe and Masada and does so in such a way that each new plot twist causes a quick rewind to make sure that the authors really DID write that passage.

I have also now listened to the second book and am eager for the third in the series. I did find the second book a little stretched in the credibility department, but this is a GREAT series.

  • Executive Actions

  • By: Gary Grossman
  • Narrated by: John McLain
  • Length: 20 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 178
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 157
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 161

An assassin takes aim at a Presidential candidate during a primary stump speech. The instant he pulls the trigger, the outcome of the election is irrevocably changed. But Democrat Teddy Lodge, an upcoming media sweetheart, isn't killed. His wife is. As a result, Lodge emerges as the man to beat and the greatest threat to the incumbent President, Morgan Taylor.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Exciting, entertaining story, so so narration.

  • By aussieGeorge68 on 09-15-13

Fantastic start

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-21-13

Espionage and spy novels almost always reflect the politics of their authors. I'm not complaining since I happen to worship at the altar of Brad Thor, Vince Flynn and Ben Coes, but their politics come through loud and clear. Not so with this novel or its successor novels. About halfway through the second of the three novels, I figured out the author's politics (and interestingly agreed with the author's critique of the actions of talk radio hosts) and by then I was HOOKED on this story.

I refuse to give the spoilers that any sort of substantive review would reveal. The theme of the story is that the wife of a candidate for President is accidentally assassinated during a speech the candidate is giving the latter part of a primary season. As the investigation progresses, many more deaths take place, seemingly unrelated. The lead character, a specially-assigned Secret Service agent, is left to track the assassin and to link the deaths. The novel is beautifully written and I listened very late into the night to go through the story and to find out what happens. I'd call it a "page turner" if I was reading in book form.

The only minor negative was the way in which the narrator performed a couple of the female voices; really snarky and crass and not how I "hear" the character speaking. The other warning that I have to give is that the author attempts to add bold sexuality and is unsuccessful. The sex scenes almost appear to be plugged in to fill in some sort of formula and the writing of the sexual scenes is not necessary to the story. Many other authors can allude to the sex without actually writing it. I'm not a prude, but the sex scenes are such that I can't let my teenager read a book that he would otherwise LOVE.

Immediately after finishing the first novel, I downloaded the second and then the third novels in the series. I simply could not stop listening to this series and cannot wait for another addition. Love the characters. Love the story. LOVE the lack of political in-your-face opinions. This is a great book.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • The White Princess

  • By: Philippa Gregory
  • Narrated by: Bianca Amato
  • Length: 19 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,006
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,813
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,799

The newest novel from #1 New York Times best-selling author and "queen of royal fiction" ( USA Today) Philippa Gregory tells the passionate story of Elizabeth of York, daughter of the White Queen, who gets caught in the middle of a battle for the crown of England. A princess from birth, Elizabeth fell in love with Richard III, though her mother made an arranged betrothal for her with the pretender to the throne: Henry Tudor. When Henry defeats Richard against all odds, Elizabeth has to marry the man who murdered her lover in battle.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Paid by the Word? Double for "the boy"?

  • By Lisa on 08-14-13

My ears are bleeding

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-27-13

I truly don't know where to start with how much I disliked this book so I'll actually begin with the few positives.

Bianca Amato's narration was extraordinary and the only feature that allowed me to finish this novel.I have listened to books she has read in the past where I wasn't in love with her voice, but for this book, her voice was well-paced and soothing to listen to. She got the gender voices done without over-exaggerating the differences. Truly, I would not have finished this book (and almost didn't) but for the narration. I have never put those words in a review before.

The novel brings the War of the Roses series to a conclusion and merges it into the Tudor series (The Constant Princess would logically follow from the conclusion of this story). I'm very glad Ms. Gregory wrote the Tudor books and The White Queen first so that I know that, somewhere, she has some knowledge of the time period. This book most certainly does not demonstrate any such knowledge.

The negatives are based in the "levels" of the book that Ms. Gregory defines at the end in her "Author's Note." Apparently, her intent was to create a "novel about a mystery that has never been solved." Therefore, she unabashedly makes stuff up left and right throughout the entire novel. I would love to see a single piece of historical research that even hints that Henry VII raped Elizabeth of York repeatedly prior to their wedding in order to see if she was fertile and only married her once she became pregnant. For Tudor fans out there who have done an iota of research, this is painful to read material. I completely understand that Ms. Gregory is of the school of thought that one of the two princes survived the Tower of London and that Richard III was not responsible for their deaths. I'm not taking a stand on that question in this review -- even if you accept as true that the younger prince (who would have rightfully been Richard IV of England) was not in the Tower of that he somehow survived or that someone other than Richard III or one of his minions killed the princes, the story doesn't work.

I will give a fiction writer every reasonable inch of "willing suspension of disbelief" to allow them to tell their story. What I will not enable with any positive comments is not warning the reader in advance that the author's plan is to do so. A recent book called "The Boleyn King" says at the outset: what if Anne Boleyn and Henry VIII had a son and Anne Boleyn was not executed? That is a very good premise for a novel and I enjoyed the story. It was fun, it was completely against any and all historical facts and I had no problem with the story BECAUSE of the disclosure. Ms. Gregory attempts in her Author's Note to justify her diversion from anything resembling truth.

Even more grating was the author's use of repetition as a literary tool. I've complained about this style in other novels she has written (specifically, "The Red Queen"), but she perfected whiny repeated phrases in this most recent epic tale. Once again, I found myself thinking "ok Philippa, I get it... Henry VII is afraid of 'the boy' who might be young Richard... I get that Henry VII and his ridiculous mother, Margaret Beaufort, trust no one and have a spy network. I get that Elizabeth of York is emotionally torn between her duties as a York princess and her duties as a Tudor wife." I felt like my ears were bleeding from the use of the words: "the boy." I'd be very interested to see a proportional word count of how many times that phrase appears. It could easily be up to 25% of the words in the entire novel. Maybe it's the presence of Margaret Beaufort -- the repetition was ghastly in the novel about her as well.

I have never, ever given a story one star until today. This book was simply horrible. Ms. Gregory fails in her attempt to re-write history; written by the victors or not. The characters are shallow and false. The writing is borderline unbearable. The "mystery" that is "solved" by the novel has nothing to do with Elizabeth of York so even the title of the book is misleading. If Ms. Gregorty wanted to write a "what if" story about the younger prince in the Tower, she should have called it "The Missing Prince" or something else that more truthfully highlights what the story is about -- not used an interesting woman from York/Lancaster/Tudor times and crammed her into being the emotional outlet for a fairytale that has no basis in fact.

If you have read all of the other books and really want to finish the story, go ahead and wade through this tome. Otherwise, use your credit more wisely.

28 of 30 people found this review helpful