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Tintin

Chicago IL
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  • Rejection Proof

  • How I Beat Fear and Became Invincible Through 100 Days of Rejection
  • By: Jia Jiang
  • Narrated by: Mike Chamberlain
  • Length: 6 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,665
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,395
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,391

Jia Jiang came to the United States with the dream of being the next Bill Gates. Despite early success in the corporate world, his first attempt to pursue his entrepreneurial dream ended in rejection. Jia was crushed and spiraled into a period of deep self-doubt. But he realized that his fear of rejection was a bigger obstacle than any single rejection would ever be, and he needed to find a way to cope with being told no without letting it destroy him.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Never Waste A Rejection!

  • By Gillian on 05-30-16

useful for sure

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-23-18

A personal journey, am interesting story and valuable lessons. It's light, sometimes too personal I felt, and some of the stories were a bit of a stretch for this theme, and there was repetition but an interesting exploration with valuable lessons. It reminded me of So You've Been Publicly Shamed by Jon Ronson.

  • The Road to Character

  • By: David Brooks
  • Narrated by: Arthur Morey, David Brooks
  • Length: 12 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,067
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,796
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,780

With the wisdom, humor, curiosity, and sharp insights that have brought millions of readers to his New York Times column and his previous best sellers, David Brooks has consistently illuminated our daily lives in surprising and original ways. In The Social Animal, he explored the neuroscience of human connection and how we can flourish together. Now, in The Road to Character, he focuses on the deeper values that should inform our lives.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Rich, textured stories

  • By Amazon Customer on 05-25-15

nice biographies, but loosely related

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-10-18

I thought it started out with a good premise, the inner and outer character, Adam 1 and Adam 2... followed by biographies, some of which were impressive, others sort of common. The book is very well written, easy just to enjoy the telling. It's really well read too, it took me some time realize I didn't know where I was going.

Early on he says skip to the last chapter if you want to hear the summary, and about half way through, I did. I think it was about 8 minutes, and the intro, I thought, had said it better.

I didn't dislike the book, it's a loose collection of biographies though and I was looking for something else. Interesting that audible suggests similar books: Better Angels, of our Nature and Enlightenment Now, both by Pinker and in my view very focused in ways I felt this wasn't.

  • Fascism

  • A Warning
  • By: Madeleine Albright
  • Narrated by: Madeleine Albright
  • Length: 9 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,864
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,697
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,676

At the end of the 1980s, when the Cold War ended, many, including former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, believed that democracy had triumphed politically once and for all. Yet nearly 30 years later, the direction of history no longer seems certain. A repressive and destructive force has begun to re-emerge on the global stage - sweeping across Europe, parts of Asia, and the United States - that to Albright, looks very much like fascism.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Warning!

  • By JAL on 04-19-18

Important, well told

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-30-18

Interesting analysis of fascism illustrating how easy it is for a nation to fall into. Very relevant and important today; learn from the mistakes of the past. Well written, well organized, it's very informed of course, considering her background. It's nice to hear her read it, although she's not a professional narrator... But I quibble, I've been recommending this widely.

  • You Are Not So Smart

  • Why You Have Too Many Friends on Facebook, Why Your Memory Is Mostly Fiction, and 46 Other Ways You're Deluding Yourself
  • By: David McRaney
  • Narrated by: Don Hagen
  • Length: 8 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 3,102
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,717
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,708

An entertaining illumination of the stupid beliefs that make us feel wise. You believe you are a rational, logical being who sees the world as it really is, but journalist David McRaney is here to tell you that you're as deluded as the rest of us. But that's OK - delusions keep us sane. You Are Not So Smart is a celebration of self-delusion. It's like a psychology class, with all the boring parts taken out, and with no homework. Based on the popular blog of the same name, You Are Not So Smart collects more than 46 of the lies we tell ourselves everyday.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • It's official, I'm an idiot

  • By Christopher on 07-04-12

Great compilation, excellent delivery

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-18-18

I've read Kahneman's Thinking Fast and Slow, Brain Bugs by Buonomano, Denialism: Specter, Pinker's How the Mind Works, and The Stuff of Thought, How we Decide by Lehrer, Mindwise, Signal and the Noise, and others so I thought I might find this repetitive. However, it's an excellent summary of themes delved into more deeply in some of these other books. It's a great review (with some new material for me) and would be a great introduction to the fallibility of our minds. Great food for thought! The narration was excellent, as was the writing, highly recommend. I'll probably buy this one in paper too, to flip through and mark up.

  • Principles

  • Life and Work
  • By: Ray Dalio
  • Narrated by: Ray Dalio, Jeremy Bobb
  • Length: 16 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,583
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,451
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,404

Ray Dalio, one of the world's most successful investors and entrepreneurs, shares the unconventional principles that he's developed, refined, and used over the past 40 years to create unique results in both life and business - and which any person or organization can adopt to help achieve their goals.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Insightful but repetitive

  • By Belle Ho on 11-16-17

A personal Memoir

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-21-18

This will be a good Memoir for this investment banker and his family, he comes across as a good person, and smart, and I have no reason to believe it's not true. Ther book wasn't as interesting or as useful as I had expected. I returned it about half way through.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Rise of the Robots

  • Technology and the Threat of a Jobless Future
  • By: Martin Ford
  • Narrated by: Jeff Cummings
  • Length: 10 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,600
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,393
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,399

In a world of self-driving cars and big data, smart algorithms and Siri, we know that artificial intelligence is getting smarter every day. Though all these nifty devices and programs might make our lives easier, they're also well on their way to making "good" jobs obsolete. A computer winning Jeopardy might seem like a trivial, if impressive, feat, but the same technology is making paralegals redundant as it undertakes electronic discovery, and is soon to do the same for radiologists.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great content and this mechanization IS coming!

  • By Mike on 06-30-15

Nicely done

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-21-18

I found it to be a nice update on AI in many walks of life, thoughtful speculation, and more economic analysis than I expected. I'd recommend this one. Narration is great -- quick and transparent.

  • 12 Rules for Life

  • An Antidote to Chaos
  • By: Jordan B. Peterson, Norman Doidge MD - foreword
  • Narrated by: Jordan B. Peterson
  • Length: 15 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 27,555
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 24,879
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 24,650

What does everyone in the modern world need to know? Renowned psychologist Jordan B. Peterson's answer to this most difficult of questions uniquely combines the hard-won truths of ancient tradition with the stunning revelations of cutting-edge scientific research. Humorous, surprising, and informative, Dr. Peterson tells us why skateboarding boys and girls must be left alone, what terrible fate awaits those who criticize too easily, and why you should always pet a cat when you meet one on the street.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Not Your Average 'Self Help' Book

  • By LadyReadsAlot on 06-04-18

Biblical advice

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-26-18

The author/narrator takes a simple hook and chapter title, like "stand up straight," and then weaves an elaborate narrative explaining the importance of resiliency, confidence, bearing, and a host of related ideas. It's quite nice. His writing and delivery is punchy, he has a charmingly indignant tone. He's known for audacity.

There's noting wrong with charisma! But after I enjoyed the first few chapters the message shifted a bit. The impassioned delivery continue but there was some illogic, and a heavy reliance on scripture. In an interview on youtube I heard Peterson asked if he believed in God and to my surprise he said he wouldn't answer -- because the word God means very different things to different people. Fair enough. But he added that he behaves "as *if* there were a God." Huh? God meaning ...

Some of his advice seemed contradictory. Early on (I paraphrase) don't sit back and take sh** from people. But when Jesus was nailed to a cross that was noble because it was for God. And when Socrates drank the poison rather than defend himself, which he could have done it was admirable because he didn't want to get old and had lived a good life already. Odd.

In a chapter on child rearing he set up straw dogs and knocked them down. I paraphrase: "My neighbor's kid was *so poorly behaved ... but I was firm and put him in line. Then this kid at the supermarket was screaming, his parents did nothing, can you believe it??!" To his credit, he's had children and knows it's not always easy. But his advice seemed a bit simple, and obvious.

I quit after 8 chapters after being carpetbombed with Old Testament references. Sometimes he presented biblical stories as alagory, sometimes as archetypal, and often as fact. I listened carefully to figure out why. Here is what I could gather: Humans developed complex behavior before they could think and communicate, so when they started writing they simply described behavior they did not understand, and therefore the early texts contain deep deep wisdom, much of it still needs to be understood. Something like that.

Any careful read of the Bible shows massive contradiction and shocking immorality -- unless you cherrypick or interpret creatively.

Peterson began explaining the origin of trade: it begins with gifting, then it becomes reciprical. Fair enough. But then he said, and I paraphrase, you should give generously *because God sees it and will reciprocate" That may be how it works in the Bible but not in the real world. Reciprical Altruism occurs in nature when 1) organisms can distinguish and remember individuals and 2) they hold a grudge. Bats do it, moles do it, lots of animals do it with no scripture whatsoever. Of course another bat or mole has to notice the behavior to get it going, no higher power necessary.

I note Peterson's popularity and I can see why. He's emphatic, he's smart, he's super confident, and he has strong opinions.

All the reliance on scripture shouldn't be necessary though. I found a .pdf and counted 230 "God"'s 42 "Adam's" 47 "Cain"'s but oddly just 6 "Jesus"'s. That gives you a sense of it.

A final note: I posted this review on Amazon, for the audible/hardcover edition, and it was not accepted because, ".. Amazon does not permit reviews from customers whose relationship to the product or sell may be perceived as biased."

... the Lord works in mysterious ways.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • A Higher Loyalty

  • Truth, Lies, and Leadership
  • By: James Comey
  • Narrated by: James Comey
  • Length: 9 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 20,892
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 19,059
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 18,972

In his audiobook, A Higher Loyalty, former FBI director James Comey shares his never-before-told experiences from some of the highest stakes situations of his career in the past two decades of American government, exploring what good, ethical leadership looks like and how it drives sound decisions. His journey provides an unprecedented entry into the corridors of powe, and a remarkable lesson in what makes an effective leader.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • More Than Trump: All Comey's Life/Working Years--

  • By Gillian on 04-17-18

Talk about integrity

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-10-18

I didn't know what to expect, but this is a book about integrity and leadership. Wonderful, a service to Americans and the American system of government. Read by the author, very smart, insightful, admirable, important.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Stuff Matters

  • Exploring the Marvelous Materials That Shape Our Man-Made World
  • By: Mark Miodownik
  • Narrated by: Michael Page
  • Length: 6 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,361
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,027
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,018

Why is glass see-through? What makes elastic stretchy? Why does a paper clip bend? These are the sorts of questions that Mark Miodownik is constantly asking himself. A globally renowned materials scientist, Miodownik has spent his life exploring objects as ordinary as an envelope and as unexpected as concrete cloth, uncovering the fascinating secrets that hold together our physical world.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Surprisingly good

  • By D. MacLeod on 01-29-15

You have to love this

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-27-18

This is a fun book, it brings forward material science to the normal guy, with chapters on familiar materials like glass, cement, paper .. and some wierd ones. He covers the atomic level to the aesthetic, playfully and richly. Then he brings it all together in the end. Masterfully written and superbly read.

  • The Daily Stoic

  • 366 Meditations on Wisdom, Perseverance, and the Art of Living
  • By: Ryan Holiday, Stephen Hanselman
  • Narrated by: Brian Holsopple
  • Length: 10 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,069
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 920
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 910

Why have history's greatest minds - from George Washington to Frederick the Great to Ralph Waldo Emerson along with today's top performers, from Super Bowl-winning football coaches to CEOs and celebrities - embraced the wisdom of the ancient Stoics? Because they realize that the most valuable wisdom is timeless and that philosophy is for living a better life, not a classroom exercise. The Daily Stoic offers a daily devotional of Stoic insights and exercises, featuring all-new translations.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Not well made as audio

  • By heldal@online.no on 12-27-16

oddly egoistic

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-17-18

Strange that this followed within a year Holiday's The Ego is the Enemy because this is a great show of his own. Each of 365 passages starts with a quote by one of the early Stoics, and is followed by Holiday's fanciful interpretation, usually pretty good advice I guess but nothing consistent or cohesive, and sometimes it's hard to see the connection to the original statement.

The narrator annoyingly put on a cartoonish voice for the quotes, very over the top. Someone might like this book if they've never heard advice before.

For stoic philosophy I've found some of the original works to be fairly opaque, but really liked William B. Irvine's analysis in A Guide to the Good Life.