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  • 4
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  • 4
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  • The Problem with Forever

  • By: Jennifer L. Armentrout
  • Narrated by: Amy Landon
  • Length: 14 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 386
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 364
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 364

For some people, silence is a weapon. For Mallory "Mouse" Dodge, it's a shield. Growing up, she learned that the best way to survive was to say nothing. And even though it's been four years since her nightmare ended, she's beginning to worry that the fear that holds her back will last a lifetime. Now, after years of homeschooling with loving adoptive parents, Mallory must face a new milestone - spending her senior year at a public high school.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • My only regret...

  • By Amazon Customer on 08-19-16

My only regret...

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-19-16

The story was pretty good. I wasn't a huge fan of the narrator, but the story was sweet.

My only regret is that I didn't count how many times Mallory mentioned Rider's dimple. Seriously. She talked about that dimple A LOT.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • All the Bright Places

  • By: Jennifer Niven
  • Narrated by: Kirby Heyborne, Ariadne Meyers
  • Length: 11 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,289
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,162
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,165

Theodore Finch is fascinated by death, and he constantly thinks of ways he might kill himself. But each time, something good, no matter how small, stops him. Violet Markey lives for the future, counting the days until graduation, when she can escape her Indiana town and her aching grief in the wake of her sister's recent death. When Finch and Violet meet on the ledge of the bell tower at school, it's unclear who saves whom.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Best YA Quirky Love Story of 2015

  • By FanB14 on 06-09-15

Okay, here goes...

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-22-16

Honestly, I didn't like the narration at all, and I think if I were to have read the book, I probably would have had a different (better) experience.

Nevertheless, I listened on. And after finishing, I haven't really been able to get it out of my head. Especially the author's note at the end, I think it was an important message to experience.

After reading countless Amazon and Audible reviews, it seems that many people were mostly annoyed with the "glorification of suicide" and the "stereotypical suicidal teen." I think it's important to ignore those kinds of comments, especially since this could be a very important book for others to read.

For starters, one point of this book is to try and put ourselves in the shoes of someone who feels suicidal. As someone who has actually been in this situation, I identified with Finch's views very much. But the alternative narration, Violet, puts us in the shoes of someone who loves that person, and the one who faces the possibility of losing them. It's a complicated thing, for both parties. And whether or not you've experienced being part of either party, you have to understand how complex our minds can be and the events that lead us to feel the way we do. This book is not a "glorification" of suicide, it is an honest narration of what some people feel and think when it comes to that subject. Saying that this book "glorifies" suicide is saying that suicide is wrong and talking about suicidal thoughts is wrong. THAT is how we never have honest conversations about this subject, that is how we ignore the complexities of what someone is going through. Reading Finch's thoughts, you can start to understand the underlying pain and turmoil he feels. Telling someone those feelings are wrong is like invalidating those feelings. It just isolates that individual even more. So no, this book does not glorify suicide, it honestly addresses it.

Secondly, to say there is a stereotypical suicidal teen is to undermine the seriousness of the subject. Yes, we hear about the "freaks" who are depressed and suicidal, but we also hear about the star athletes who are under too much pressure, and the popular girls in school who are secretly bullied and harassed, and the nobody's that everyone ignores. We hear countless profiles of suicidal teens because there is no single profile. It's an issue that affects people of all backgrounds. So to criticize this book just because the author picked one of those profiles is just ridiculous. It ignores what's actually important.

Apologies for the rant, but I don't want reviews like those to deter people from reading (or listening to) this book. It was beautifully written, and it was honest. It's a subject that we need to stop being afraid to talk about. 10/10 would recommend.

  • Eleanor & Park

  • By: Rainbow Rowell
  • Narrated by: Rebecca Lowman, Sunil Malhotra
  • Length: 8 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,263
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,760
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,780

Set over the course of one school year, in 1986, this is the story of two star-crossed misfits - smart enough to know that first love almost never lasts, but brave and desperate enough to try. When Eleanor meets Park, you’ll remember your own first love - and just how hard it pulled you under.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • E + P 4-ever!

  • By FanB14 on 04-27-14

Unexpected Treasure

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-23-16

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

I'm going to be honest, I didn't expect big things from this book. I thought it would be a basic teen novel that I could listen to when the work day was slow and didn't need to pay much attention. I was wrong, and I got nothing done at work once I started this audio book. This isn't your run of the mill teen love story, this is every cheesy feeling you ever had for your first love...with zero guilt. When you're young, you think your first love will last forever. When it doesn't, you look back and think of how silly and naive you were to think so. But this book reminds you of WHY you believed that, and then makes you wish it had....or at least that it will last forever for these two characters. Normally, this kind of book might make you gag or roll your eyes at the attempted "lovey dovey" comments...but the dialogue in "Eleanor and Park" will only make you smile. The book's romance is well-balanced with Eleanor's troubling home life, creating a well-rounded and more realistic plot. It'll tug on your heart strings, and leave you wishing there was just one more chapter.

What about Rebecca Lowman and Sunil Malhotra ’s performance did you like?

I absolutely loved Rebecca and Sunil's narration. I loved it so much that I'm glad I listened to the book instead of read it. The only aspect of narration that was a little silly was Sunil's voice for Eleanor, but even that was lovable.