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  • 16
  • reviews
  • 56
  • helpful votes
  • 156
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  • Something in the Water

  • A Novel
  • By: Catherine Steadman
  • Narrated by: Catherine Steadman
  • Length: 11 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 27,529
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 25,534
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 25,445

Erin is a documentary filmmaker on the brink of a professional breakthrough, Mark a handsome investment banker with big plans. Passionately in love, they embark on a dream honeymoon to the tropical island of Bora Bora, where they enjoy the sun, the sand, and each other. Then, while scuba diving in the crystal blue sea, they find something in the water....

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Give this a HARD PASS

  • By 3dewdrops on 06-27-18

Good but no great

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-08-18

In trying to make this mystery/thriller more than just a mystery/thriller, the author ends up slowing down the tale somewhat. Also, the real plot doesn’t kick in for a couple of hours after the excellent opening—actually, this is a good thing. While the entire book is well written, the first 4 or 5 hours are most engrossing. I thought the book was a good listen, well read by the actress author, and I will look forward to her next novel.

  • Seveneves

  • A Novel
  • By: Neal Stephenson
  • Narrated by: Mary Robinette Kowal, Will Damron
  • Length: 31 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 16,482
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15,312
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 15,305

A catastrophic event renders the earth a ticking time bomb. In a feverish race against the inevitable, nations around the globe band together to devise an ambitious plan to ensure the survival of humanity far beyond our atmosphere, in outer space.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • So Much Potential

  • By Kurt Schwoppe on 06-08-17

imaginative and fascinating

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-28-15

is the book "technical"? Well, it reads technical, but the details are surprisingly smooth to swallow. The book is a course in physics and biology--one actually learns things--but most of all is just a really good read (listen?). Some have criticized the narrators, but they did not bother me, or interfere with the story. I'm sure no writer likes to be compared to other writers, but for the benefit of potential readers, I'd say this book combines the inventive scientific excitement of Michael Creighton (Jurassic Park or Andromeda Strain) with the attention to detail of Thomas Pynchon (Gravity's Rainbow), and the readability of Grisham.

  • The Silkworm

  • By: Robert Galbraith
  • Narrated by: Robert Glenister
  • Length: 17 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,513
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15,164
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15,131

When novelist Owen Quine goes missing, his wife calls in private detective Cormoran Strike. At first, Mrs. Quine just thinks her husband has gone off by himself for a few days - as he has done before - and she wants Strike to find him and bring him home. But as Strike investigates, it becomes clear that there is more to Quine's disappearance than his wife realizes. The novelist has just completed a manuscript featuring poisonous pen-portraits of almost everyone he knows.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Made Alligator Alley fly by

  • By Tracey on 06-26-14

Interesting but not fascinating

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-16-14

There are inside jokes about the dog-eat-dog world of publishing, but for me, there was not that much to hold my interest, and the premise was implausible. The reveals were not that surprising either. That said, the narrator was very good, though his American accent could use a little work.

I prefer the American detective story more than the British, more relaxed, version of the genre. Perhaps this colored my review.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Mr. Mercedes

  • A Novel
  • By: Stephen King
  • Narrated by: Will Patton
  • Length: 14 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 28,063
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 25,696
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 25,666

In the frigid pre-dawn hours, in a distressed Midwestern city, hundreds of desperate unemployed folks are lined up for a spot at a job fair. Without warning, a lone driver plows through the crowd in a stolen Mercedes, running over the innocent, backing up, and charging again. Eight people are killed; fifteen are wounded. The killer escapes. Mr. Mercedes is a war between good and evil, from the master of suspense whose insight into the mind of this obsessed, insane killer is chilling and unforgettable.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Love this style of King!!!

  • By Joyce on 07-07-14

For true noir fans, might disappoint

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-29-14

Is there anything you would change about this book?

For me, this is not genre fiction, it is Stephen King writing like Stephen King, subbing detective fiction for horror. That could be good enough--his book on the JFK assassination was excellent--but I found two problems. First, I was expecting some kind of riff on Raymond Chandler and was disappointed. Second, I did not find the main characters interesting or compelling. The book is plot driven, not character driven. And I didn't find the plot that compelling.

Would you listen to another book narrated by Will Patton?

I don't know his range, but he read the book like it was hard-boiled detective fiction, which it is not. For me, his voice took on too much of a downbeat, almost horror story intonation that was not appropriate to the material.

If this book were a movie would you go see it?

No.

Any additional comments?

Those who justifiably follow Mr. King will probably like this book. But, if you are looking for a slam-bang mystery full of atmosphere, twists, and turns, with a really spooky (rather than simply distasteful) villain, try something like "Silence of the Lambs." And, for noir, if you haven't read Chandler or Dashiel Hammet, do so.

  • The Storyteller

  • By: Jodi Picoult
  • Narrated by: Mozhan Marno, Jennifer Ikeda, Edoardo Ballerini, and others
  • Length: 18 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,336
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,304
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,309

Jodi Picoult's poignant number one New York Times best-selling novels about family and love tackle hot-button issues head on. In The Storyteller, Sage Singer befriends Josef Weber, a beloved Little League coach and retired teacher. But then Josef asks Sage for a favor she never could have imagined - to kill him. After Josef reveals the heinous act he committed, Sage feels he may deserve that fate. But would his death be murder or justice?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Perfect title especially for the audio format!

  • By Abby R. on 03-05-13

Well performed, but the Holocaust again?

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-13-13

Any additional comments?

If you have never read about the Holocaust in World War II, this is an excellent book to acquaint you with the horror and madness of that era. And, not that there are two sides to the story, but there are two sides to the people--both Germans and Jews. Well-written and superbly read, the book works as history and novel.

But, if you have more than a passing knowledge of the Holocaust, or have known people who have lived through it, you might not want to revisit the subject. I have known survivors, and was not aware of the Holocaust part of the story before listening to it. My problem was "seeing" my relatives as participants in the story, and that was to say the least, uncomfortable.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Lexicon

  • By: Max Barry
  • Narrated by: Heather Corrigan, Zach Appelman
  • Length: 12 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,561
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,330
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,339

At an exclusive school somewhere outside of Arlington, Virginia, students aren't taught history, geography, or mathematics - at least not in the usual ways. Instead, they are taught to persuade. Here the art of coercion has been raised to a science. Students harness the hidden power of language to manipulate the mind and learn to break down individuals by psychographic markers in order to take control of their thoughts. The very best will graduate as "poets": adept wielders of language who belong to a nameless organization that is as influential as it is secretive.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Fasten your seat belt...

  • By Tango on 06-22-13

Keeps you listening, and talk about big brother

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-13-13

Any additional comments?

Besides being a good thriller, the book makes some interesting points about the nature of language and how a Big Brother government takes over using "words." Magic words might not exist in our world, but propaganda--isn't that kind of the same thing if it persuades people to do things they might never have thought of? Taken literally, or as a parable for overreaching government, the book works. The narrators are some of the best--each character is vividly convincing. Only negative is that the Australian accents are really not very good, especially Ms. Corrigan's. But the acting more than makes up for this fault, and story-wise, Aussiespeak in itself is not integral to the plot.

  • The Fifth Assassin

  • By: Brad Meltzer
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick
  • Length: 14 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,966
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,750
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,750

From John Wilkes Booth to Lee Harvey Oswald, there have been more than two dozen assassination attempts on the President of the United States. Four have been successful. But now, Beecher White - the hero of the number one New York Times best seller The Inner Circle - discovers a killer in Washington, D.C. who's meticulously re-creating the crimes of these four men. Historians have branded them as four lone wolves. But what if they were wrong?

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • I had to stop listening a little bit into the book

  • By Janice on 01-17-13

Not the Ring trilogy

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-14-13

What could have made this a 4 or 5-star listening experience for you?

Look, it's my fault for not realizing this book was part of a trilogy. So, since I did not read Book 1, I was not primed to read this book. And I feel this book does not stand on its own. It isn't that I missed Book 1. its more that I expected a fuller story in this book. All the 14 hours of build up and suspense just seem to get dissipated by the 15th hour made to set up Book 3, whenever it will be written and published.

As far as believability, Beecher, the main character is an archivist, i.e. a librarian. Why? What about the Dewey Decimal System makes one a James Bond? Given the subject matter, he could have been FBI or Secret Service. Wouldn't have really made a difference and would have been more believable. While the author added substantial back stories to some of the main characters--usually a good thing--jumping from the present to past often seemed to cut or frustrate tension rather than enhance it.

I've listened to Scot Brick before and liked his readings. This time, however, it seemed like every sentence was read as if the next were about to reveal the secret of the universe--the reading was somewhat overboard.

I wanted to like the book based on interviews with Brad Meltzer. I was looking for to a great historical thriller. The book does pretty well deliver well on history, but I was not thrilled.

  • The Lost Symbol

  • By: Dan Brown
  • Narrated by: Paul Michael
  • Length: 17 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 15,943
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,540
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 9,638

Harvard symbologist Robert Langdon is summoned to deliver an evening lecture in the U.S. Capitol. Within minutes of his arrival, the night takes a bizarre turn. A disturbing object is discovered in the Capitol Building. The object is an ancient invitation, meant to usher its recipient into a long-lost world of hidden esoteric wisdom. And when Langdon's mentor is kidnapped, Langdon's only hope of saving him is to accept this invitation and follow wherever it leads him.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • In love with books again

  • By Paul on 01-31-10

Fast read but almost a waste of time

Overall
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-29-09

For me, the best way to describe this book is to use the analogy of going to a French restaurant for a great dinner (The Da Vinci Code) and then the next day go to a fast-food joint with a French-style menu. Everything is similar but not as good. Also, the book is extremely formulaic, but so openly so, you see the formula more than the plot. And the writing probably has more clich?s than any professional writer should include.

But, it is a fast read--good for long, long plane rides or boring vacations. And if you ever wondered about the Masons, this is their Gone with the Wind.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Daemon

  • By: Daniel Suarez
  • Narrated by: Jeff Gurner
  • Length: 15 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14,195
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,790
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,833

Thousands of autonomous computer programs, or daemons, make our networked world possible, running constantly in the background of our lives, trafficking e-mail, transferring money, and monitoring power grids. For the most part, daemons are benign, but the same can't always be said for the people who design them.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Possibly The Best Techno-thriller Ever

  • By Erica on 01-22-09

Just short of Great

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-11-09

I heard about this book the day I heard Michael Creighton died. Suarez is a worthy successor. The pace gallops along,one learns about, and understands, the implications of high tech, and it just plain fun to read. Is it too techie for some? Maybe, but everything is explained well and is real (not like, say, teleporters in Star Trek). Only disappointment is the end--not that it is illogical or doesn't make sense--in that it is something of a letdown considering how the book builds up and up.

13 of 16 people found this review helpful

  • Simple Courage

  • A True Story of Peril on the Sea
  • By: Frank Delaney
  • Narrated by: Frank Delaney
  • Length: 9 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 157
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 52
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 54

Drawing on historical documents and contemporary accounts and on exclusive interviews with Carlsen's family, Delaney opens a window into the world of the merchant marine. With deep affection, and respect, for the weather and all that goes with it, he places us in the heart of the storm, a "biblical tempest" of unimaginable power. He illuminates the bravery and ingenuity of Carlsen and the extraordinary courage that the 37-year-old captain inspired in his stalwart crew.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Well written and read

  • By AMS on 03-03-08

Well written and read

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-03-08

Sometimes having the author read his own material is a mistake. Not here. Mr. Delaney's reading is vivid and his slight brogue a pleasure to hear. The story itself is unique and exciting, although it does drag a bit in the aftermath (though the aftermath is very pertinent, it just couldn't be as exciting as action on the high seas during a hurricane.)

5 of 5 people found this review helpful