LISTENER

Kingsley

Henely Brook, Australia
  • 343
  • reviews
  • 781
  • helpful votes
  • 1,318
  • ratings
  • The Forever Sleep

  • By: Derwin Lester II, Cassie Poormokhtar
  • Narrated by: Jason Sprenger
  • Length: 1 hr and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12

A century ago, the World Government sold it as "Peace on Earth." All they did was convince the citizens of the world to download their minds into the Internet, leaving their bodies floating in stasis tanks. Now Sergeant First Class (Ret.) Scott Douglas was free to read a book in peace, without having to listen to the hippies and their endless whining. His only job was to walk through the stasis tanks once a day and check for problems. Then the Internet went down. Without it regulating their brains, humanity would be dead in a matter of days. It was up to Scott to save the hippies, even if all they did was complain.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Great epic tale delivered in a short story!

  • By Roark C. on 12-06-18

A strange tale of virtual reality

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-10-18

3.5 / 5

Other than 100 people or so, everyone in the world has given up on real life and life inside The Matrix. Preferring that world to what life was like on the outside. But then the Matrix stops working and someone has to fix it.

This is an epistolary story, told in the form of a series on diary entries to an unknown reader. Our hero is one of the few who didn't decide to live his life online, and he is recording his thoughts and actions for posterity, or for his own sanity's sake. The story takes a very hard left turn half way through and I'm not sure I completely liked the change in direction.

There is a lot of ideas crammed into this book - long lives through using multiple clone bodies, The Matrix type life, consciousnesses transferred to robot bodies, space travel and more. I think there is the basis here for a longer story if the author wanted to flesh it out. There was enough going on without the 'hard left' that was included. But the introduction does mention is author Derwin Lester II's first story, so maybe if he told the story again, as a more experienced writer, it might have worked together better.

Overall, it was an enjoyable and interesting story.

Narration by Jason Sprenger was good. He is clear and well paced. He used some audio effects for when the robot was talking, but it was not overbearing. There was however a rustling /page turning sound at the start of each chapter that I wasn't a fan of. I guess it was supposed to show the 'writing in a diary' type framing of the story but it didnt completely work for me.

This book was given to me for free at my request and I provided this review voluntarily.

  • Winds of War

  • By: Rhett C. Bruno, Jaime Castle
  • Narrated by: Luke Daniels
  • Length: 11 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 41
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 41
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 41

Full-scale rebellion rages in the south, and Sir Torsten Unger must lead the Glass Army to face it. But when a new and unfamiliar king forces Torsten to march alongside one of his fiercest rivals, he must draw on his faith to keep the army from fracturing. Whitney Fierstown continues his tutelage of the blood mage, Sora, who is desperate to get a better handle on her mysterious powers. Their journey brings them to the merchant city of Winde Port, where they seek passage to Yaolin City aboard a ship. It's smooth sailing until they realize an old nemesis is hunting them....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Magnificent!

  • By Ecualegacy on 12-10-18

War and Rememberance

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-10-18

Picking up where book one ended 'Winds of War' continues the story of Whitney, Sora and Torsten. Fallout form the events of book one is starting to haunt them. A new young King is back on the throne, bringing more chaos with him. The insanity that was present in previous royalty appears present with the new King as he makes dangerous decisions, inviting the country into a war. A war that will greatly affect all three of our heroes.

The book doesn't stray far from what worked in the first book of the series. This book focuses a fair bit more of the realm and what is happening with the royals than the previous one did. That is partially because it is dealing with the events of the last book, which changed the power dynamics of the realm. It does however keep the similar 'Whitney undertaking heists' type storylines of the first. He's still attempting stupid con jobs and overestimating his abilities.

Similar to prior book this one keeps Whitney and Torsten separate for the most part. The do come together in the end, but I would have liked to see more interaction between them. The fun on watching Torsten deal with someone as morally ambiguous as Whitney, or someone as heretical as Sora, yet still having affection for them due to their shared past, is always fun. More of it would have been nice.

The story is interesting and action packed. It's bigger and bolder than the first, with an entire war taking place around the characters.There was one somewhat Dues Ex moment, where Whitney is saved due to a convenient and luckily timed external attack, but it wasn't that much of a problem for me.

The ending sets everything up for an interesting third book, with some important events from this book and the first coming to a head. Looking forward to it.

Luke Daniels narration is more of the same. If you liked the first, you will like this. He characters are bold. Some work better than others, but at least they never meld together. He provides action, energy and emotion. Another fun reading from him.

This book was given to me for free at my request and I provided this review voluntarily.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Make Me No Grave

  • By: Hayley Stone
  • Narrated by: Oliver Wyman
  • Length: 10 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 67
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 65
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 64

Almena Guillory, better known as the Grizzly Queen of the West, has plenty to recommend her for the noose, but US Marshal Apostle Richardson enforces the law, he doesn't decide it. When a posse tries to lynch Almena ahead of her trial, Apostle refuses their form of expedited justice - and receives a bullet for his trouble. Before escaping, however, Almena unexpectedly saves his life by absorbing his wound through the use of dangerous flesh magic.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Strong characters hold together a weird west world

  • By Jamie on 12-01-18

Western with supernatural infusion

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-10-18

'Make Me no Grave' is a supernatural / magic infused Western, but it is primarily a Western. Set in a post Civil War period it follows a Federal Marshal as they chase a criminal and prevent vigilante justice. They just happen to end up chasing someone not quite human. There is not a whole magic system a la Sanderson's Mistborn western, or even a whole swath of magic users. There is not a world of magic in a Western setting. It is a Western setting, with one character with extraordinary, supernatural abilities that they don't really understand or know the origins of. Those abilities play a huge part in the story, and are part of the drive for the story.

Author Hayley Stone has written some really engaging and interesting characters. The two leads, Marshal Apostle Richardson and Almena Guillory, are fully formed and are gateways to a wider world. The Marshal with his law and order out look, his search for justice is the entry into a traditional western era story. A Rooster Cogburn for this story. The Civil War and his involvement in it has shaped him. Guillory is a gateway for a wider world of weird and supernatural, while also being grounded in the realities of the Cvil War and the western era. While more supernatural elements are not shown, many of the characters take her abilities as a given (especially in interactions with native Americans), because it is known there is a wider world or spirits out there. There is a bevy of supporting characters that spring off the page as real and interesting.

The story is more character driven than plot driven. It's about these two are they interact and come to understand their positions. How they interact drives it. That isn't to say there isn't a plot, and it does come to a mighty fine climax, but it isn't a clear end goal for most of the book.

Narration by Oliver Wyman is great. He is perfect for a western. He suits the first person narration of the marshal perfectly. He engages the text wonderfully, making it come alive off the page. Action, emotion, voices, characters, he puts it all in there. Wonderful work.

This book was given to me for free at my request and I provided this review voluntarily.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Zero G

  • By: Dan Wells
  • Narrated by: Emily Woo Zeller, Margaret Ying Drake, Josh Hurley, and others
  • Length: 4 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,441
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1,324
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,320

Twelve-year-old Zero is traveling with 20,000 people for 105 years to colonize a new planet. Everyone is in stasis, so they'll be safe during the trip, but when Zero's pod malfunctions it wakes him early, like 105 years early. At first he's excited to be the only one awake - he has the entire ship to himself, so he can go anywhere and see and do and eat anything he wants - but when a family of space pirates show up, trying to hijack the ship and kidnap the colonizers, Zero has to think fast and find a way to stop them all on his own.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Passengers movie with space pirates

  • By Kingsley on 12-07-18

Passengers movie with space pirates

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-07-18

Earth has discovered two planets which could sustain human life, and have built two generation ships to take 20,000 people to each planet. Zero and his family (his parent's worked on creating the generation ship) are part of the 20,000 who will board the ship and be put into cryostasis for the 105 year journey. But 28 days into a 105 year journey, as the ship goes through the Kuiper Belt, Zero wakes up to find himself alone on a giant ship. Alone, except for the space pirates living in The Belt who are trying to steal parts off of the ship. Can Zero stop the pirates, and work out how to get his cryopod working again?

While this is on the surface a kids story, it is well told and engaging and good for the entire family. Kids will enjoy it, and adults probably will too. Adults won't have to endure it.

The science in this book is good, but also easily accessible for all ages. It easily describes things like the lack of set direction in space (the enemies gate is down!) and how asteroid belts work (not like star wars where you weave between rocks that are always clashing together), without descending into information dumps. The science is built into the story.

Main narration is performed by Zeller, with the voices for each character done by other actors. So each individual character has a very distinct voice. The multiple voices are seamlessly integrated together, and sound really good. There is minimal sound effects or music. It is used but it is light and subtle touches, so enhance the production but not overwhelm it. There are other effects such as doing slight voice echos when Zero first wakes up and is searching a empty space ship alone - gives impression of space and emptiness that really adds to the atmosphere.

44 of 44 people found this review helpful

  • Out of My Mind

  • By: Alan Arkin
  • Narrated by: Alan Arkin
  • Length: 2 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,040
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 951
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 946

In this Audible Original “mini-memoir”, the Academy Award-winning star of Little Miss Sunshine and Argo looks back on his life as a series of philosophical turning points, learning experiences, and a-ha moments. Drawn from a collection of seemingly inexplicable stories and encounters from Arkin's 84 years on this planet, Out of My Mind is a candid, relatable and delightfully irreverent take on how one man went searching for meaning and ended up discovering himself.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Amazing journey into Alan's self!

  • By Amazon Customer on 12-09-18

One Man's spiritual journey

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-07-18

Alan Arkin is a famous actor, director, screenwriter, and Academy Award winner. But this autobiography is not about his career in movies. It's about his journey of self discovery through Eastern religion and mysticism, primarily Buddhism and Hinduism.

He tells of his beginnings as a 'know it all' who was sure there was nothing beyond this world, and his change and he came to understand he didn't know it all. He anecdotes from his life of feeling movements of 'spiritual energy' and healing. He espouses the benefits of meditation, how it has helped him, and how he advocates for other to do it (although he says he has mellowed and no longer talks about it unless someone asks him first). He discusses his spiritual mentors through his life, particularity a life long friendship with a man named John. He talks of not worrying so much if it is actually true, but living as if it is true and the effect that peace has brought him.

If you are hoping for an insight into his acting career, this is not for you. If you were wanting a traditional biography telling of the where and whens, you won't find it here. This is much more story like, with subjective ideas and events weaving together. It is based on the theme of his spirituality.

Alan Arkin does fine with his narration, as you would hope for a respected, seasoned actor. The entire piece is just him, no friends or interviews or sound effect or background music. He is telling stories, and there isn't a whole lot of range of emotion or action in those stories to flex the acting skills, but he does make them engaging and provides energy where it is needed. He is clear, well paced and enjoyable to listen to.

39 of 42 people found this review helpful

  • Jingle Bell Pop

  • By: John Seabrook
  • Narrated by: Erin Moon
  • Length: 1 hr and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,090
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 999
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 999

On Christmas Eve, 1818, in a small Austrian village, a local Catholic priest and a church organist composed a Christmas carol that changed the course of holiday music forever. Exactly two hundred years later, it’s not the holiday season until you’ve heard “Silent Night” in the car, at the store and on TV – all in the same day. 

In Jingle Bell Pop, John Seabrook, acclaimed author of The Song Machine, takes us deep inside the holiday music business. We go behind the scenes to meet some of the producers, songwriters and recording artists responsible for the timeless tunes we hear on repeat between Thanksgiving and Christmas every year.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Making of a Christmas Hit

  • By Kingsley on 12-07-18

Making of a Christmas Hit

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-07-18

What makes a Christmas or Holiday song? Why do so many song writers attempt it? Part history, part musical analysis, that is what that audio production tries to answer.

'Jingle Bell Pop' focuses on the 'Christmas Canon', the most popular Christmas and holiday songs that we hear over and over again every year. It looks at the history of them, who created them and why they have stuck around.

There is discussion on how the 'canon' is effectively closed, with no holiday songs with sticking power having been created for a few decades. It discussed how Christmas songs/albums were once in vogue, then fell out and became the thing for artists well past their prime, and it's eventual return to being a 'must have' in many artists catalog.

It looks at the different types of songs such as traditional carols with Christian themes, holiday songs with no Christmas references (just winter/snowy imagery type stuff), WW2 era songs with their dour approach, right up to 'modern' classics.

It discusses the styles (the use of sleigh bells, janglely pianos etc; how often even the newer songs use elements to sound like older songs and invoke nostalgia) and writers (a surprising number are Jewish - mostly writing 'holiday' songs rather than 'Christmas' songs) and much more.

One of the most interesting, yet obvious in hindsight, things in this is the discussion on how writing a Christmas song that comes back every year can truly make an artist rich. You write a #1 pop song, and it sits in the chart for a dozen weeks and you make some quick cash. You make a Christmas song that sticks (either an original or a version that people will play again and again), and it comes back for six weeks every year for the next 50 years. Paying royalties to the artist or their estate for long into the future. A good Christmas/holiday song is a golden ticket.

Erin Moon is good as a main narrator. Clear, well paced and engaging. There is lots of interview snippets throughout, with music experts and historians, but Moon is the vast majority of the audio.

For a audio product about music there is not a huge amount in here. There is snippets of songs every now and again (for example 10 seconds of 'Santa Baby' during the discussion of that song's history) and there is some light instrumental music in the background, but generally the use of music within his is fairly well constrained. It's not over bearing or over used. There are dozens (hundreds) of songs mentioned in passing that no musical reference is made. If you know the song then you know it, if not you move on. There is no way they could have done a musical reference for every song mentioned. It would have been too much. A very good balance between reminding giving the listened a taste and overwhelming the listener is struck.

If you are interested at all in the pop culture history this is an extremely interesting audio documentary and worth listening to.

38 of 42 people found this review helpful

  • The Diary of a Hounslow Girl

  • An Audible Original
  • By: Ambreen Razia
  • Narrated by: Ambreen Razia
  • Length: 1 hr and 36 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 433
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 394
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 392

You’ve heard of an Essex Girl or even a Chelsea Girl, but what about a Hounslow Girl? Definition of a Hounslow Girl: a young Muslim woman who wears hooped earrings with her headscarf and grapples with traditional values while hustling her way through urban London. The Diary of a Hounslow Girl is a bold and provocative one-person play, written and performed by Ambreen Razia. From the joys of traditional Pakistani weddings to fights on the night bus, this is a comic story of dreams, aspirations and coming of age, told through the eyes of a 16-year-old British Muslim girl. 

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Standard coming of age with Islamic slant

  • By Kingsley on 12-07-18

Standard coming of age with Islamic slant

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-07-18

The 'coming of age' story is a fairly well trodden path. This story has much of the same stuff that has been seen many times before in the genre - a young woman finding her place between family expectations and obligations, her social life outside the family, and her desire to be more and see more, to not be trapped in the same small place she grew up in. I've read and seen this story dozens of times before.

The broad strokes are the same - conflicting cultural influences (here it's modern British culture vs traditional Islamic), meeting a boy whom the parents wouldn't approve, having to decide if the love of the boy is more or less important than familial relationships, the need to live up to an older sibling who is meeting all the familial expectations. The difference her is the basis of the Islamic culture. The Pakistani-British life, and the pull between the two parts. I've seen this story told with other cultures - Greek, Chinese, Indian etc. but not an Islamic one.

So is it groundbreaking? No. But it's a good story that keeps you attention. And it's an insight into the particulars of the Pakistani-British culture that I would not have otherwise had.

'The Diary of a Hounslow Girl' started as a stage play, and has since been (apparently) made into a TV show, and now adapted into an Audible Original show. Unfortunately, for me, that adaptation leaves a lot to be desired.

The voice acting is good. There are times I found it too be almost too quick, during times of excitement, but is generally well done. But it's the production that really dragged it down for me

The audio productions is too much here. There is sound effects, vocal effects, breathing, music and all sorts that actually drown out the play, both literally - making it hard to hear some parts - and figuratively - the music and other parts can make the 'this part is emotional' overly in your face. There is no subtlety to it.

For the first part of the play the main character is running a lot. And you get loud heavy breathing through everything she says. Other points include background noise of traditional cultural music and what sounds like a bazaar, that don't really fit. During some 'deep thought' / epiphany type moments there is over the top and also has a slight (and highly distracting) echo effect on the narration.

They threw as much audio effect and production as they could into this, and for the most part I did not think it added value.

The last 15 minutes is an interview with writer Ambreen Razia. This is certainly interesting and it explains the process of writing and what she was trying to capture in the play.

62 of 62 people found this review helpful

  • The History of Iran from Ancient Persia to the Ayatollahs

  • By: M Clement Hall, Charles River Editors
  • Narrated by: Tracey Norman
  • Length: 4 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars 9
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 8
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars 8

How did Iran get to where it is today, at the forefront of global affairs? The history of Iran and the theme of Persian conflict with the West stretches back thousands of years, and it is a unique history of empire, culture, art, pride, and religious nationalism. The History of Iran from Ancient Persia to the Ayatollahs comprehensively and descriptively covers this history, progressing through a timeline dating back to antiquity and examining all of the different religious, political, foreign, and military issues that affect Iran and are affected by Iran today.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Interesting

  • By J and M on 12-09-18

Date. Event. Date. Event. Repeat

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-04-18

'The History of Iran from Ancient Persia to the Ayatollahs' is effectively a long list of dates and events.

'Year X: this happened. Year X+1: this happened" and so it flows for several hours. While it might be hard to cover the 3000 year history in under five hours, I was hoping for more from this book. There is no flow between these events, no discussion of how one relates to another, no cohesive 'narrative' of Iran and what makes it what it is.

Even as it get's into modern times and there is more potential for discussion it doesn't really change. The details get more - we get specific dates rather than years - but there is still little cross referencing or discussion of one event to another, how they affected one another or built off previous events.

There are some cool tidbits in among all this. Like the ruler who was crowned in utero (how did they know he was going to be a he?). But these little bits don't make up for the rest.

The date and list might work well enough for a text based book, because it can be a quick reference or you can flip to a particular date, but you cannot do that with the audiobook and thus it becomes a long list of 'date: event' that never really comes together as a whole piece.

Narration by Tracey Norman is fine. They do the best they can with the text provided. It is clear, well paced and easy to follow. No issue with the narration itself.

This book was given to me for free at my request and I provided this review voluntarily.

  • American Legends: The Life of Howard Hughes

  • By: Charles River Editors
  • Narrated by: James Romick
  • Length: 4 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 9
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 9
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 9

Howard Hughes lived a life that was quintessentially American, and his personal history was so varied, improbable, and extraordinary that he practically resembled a living folk hero. Hughes was barely in his 20s during America's Roaring Twenties, but he had already begun to command the nation's headlines as a multitalented millionaire, and the varied pastimes that his talents and wealth afforded him made him nearly impossible to ignore.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Boring Account of An Extraordinary Life

  • By Tom Anderson on 12-10-18

Highs and Lows of The Aviator

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-04-18

In his life Howard Hughes was many things - record setting aviator, engineer, movie producer and director, philanthropist, seducer of young women, consummate liar, and reclusive germophobe. 'American Legends: The Life of Howard Hughes' gives a interesting and detailed recounting of his life, the highs and the lows. The good and the bad.

From confusing beginnings (Hughes always lied about his early life - adoption, one of triplets, unknown birth date or location) through to his reclusive end (the last photo of him was taken more than 20 years before he died) Hughes led an interesting life. The book gives details of that life, including some of the less savory aspects of his life - continually getting acting jobs and seducing younger and younger women, getting engaged to them but never marrying. At some points he was stringing several along and was engaged to multiple people at once.

His issues with mental health are also a large part of who he was, as he descended more and more into fears for his health. The book covers some of the early health issues he had as a youth that would have fed into this later fear. It also seems the straw the broke the camels back was a sexually transmitted disease, which he would have got because of his unending womanising.

This book is a great biography of an interesting man. Well told, it is quick paced and engaging.It delves into not just what he did, but also what made him tick.

Narration by James Romick is good. Clear, well paced, interesting and engaging. Very happy with his work and would listen to more books he narrated.

This book was given to me for free at my request and I provided this review voluntarily.

  • The 88 Laws of the Masculine Mindset: How to Elevate Your Life to the Next Level

  • By: John Winters
  • Narrated by: Jacob Tyler
  • Length: 1 hr and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 5
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 4

The book is a collection of the most important mindset and personal development laws or guidelines for men. The laws are listed from one to 88. The format allows you to load up 88 important ideas into your mind very quickly. This book is designed to be an introduction to all of the most valuable personal development ideas I have used to change and improve my own life. If you had one hour to find the most important ideas to change your life, then this book will help you achieve that goal.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A life-changing listen

  • By Anonymous User on 11-13-18

How to be friendless unlikable and rich

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-03-18

'The 88 Laws of the Masculine Mindset' has a very narrow idea of what masculine means. It is basically equates to 'success at all costs', especially when 'success' means rich and dating hot girls. Does not matter if you end up friendless, alone and pretty much considered a jerk by everyone you know, because you will have succeeded.

Not all of the rules are bad. Some are actually really good (like rule #1 - taking responsibility, even if it's not your fault) but overall this book does not present a picture of what masculinity should be, or what people should strive to be like.

I said you might end up successful but alone because part of the meat it talks about includes saying that spending time with friends is wasted time, that you must be selfish, that you must focuses almost exclusively on your goal. It also says (multiple times) that if anyone says that you have changed and that they like the old you better this is a good thing. Them not liking who you have become is an indication that you are on the right path.

It also says that the 'biggest responsibility' is for a man to be rich. To make a lot of money. Not serving, protecting, honoring, caring, supporting or anything like that. Getting rich.

There are some good rules in here too. It's not all bad. There are also many that are generally good advice and have nothing to do with masculinity. They could be 'laws' given to females and provide just as much benefit.

My issue is not solely with the rules, as there is many good ones, but in how they are presented. The rule itself sounds good and reasonable, and then you read the detail in the chapter and realise how warped the view is.

There is also a whole lot of outdated and wrong 'women are emotional and you shouldn't be emotional, men are rational' type discussions. it's not so much the rules themselves by the condescending way that 'the other' is discussed - called losers, bitches, wimps. Basically a whole lot of disdain for anyone who isn't on the path to his version of success.

Some of the rules (both god and bad ones) in this book include:
- Take ownership of your life, even if it's not your fault. (the good and the bad)
- be the centre of your reality. Make everything revolve around you.
- admire successful people (which sounds fine, until it started describing the opposite as 'disgusting' and 'losers')
- don't be yourself (it not enough)
- don't ask for permission to do what you want to do (it's not your family or friends business what you do)
- find any excuse to win
- don't share your feelings with anyone, because noone cares about them
- become very selfish (your mission should be priority over everything - friends, girlfriend, wife, family, whatever)
- never have a vacation or a break (travelling is fine, if you work while you travel)
- sacrifice short term fun for long term gain
- your mission is priority for your time (they suggest should be 90% of your time)
- make friends with your shadows / dark side (this chapter mentions that you need to embrace the stuff that 'stupidly gets called toxic masculinity' )
- treat 'sheep' with disdain - you are a lion
- meat is the foundation of your diet eat meat and lots of it - it's the source of your masculine power.
- take a holistic approach to improvement
- take risks without a safety net, get out of your comfort zone
- people are not equal,
- action on a mediocre idea is better than no action on a great idea
- become a man who confronts his 'inner bitch'
- winning is important. participation trophies are for losers.
- try things that scare you
- influence the world
- don't settle or quit in any situation
- go on the offense


Narration by Jacob Tyler is good. He has a husky voice that suits the stereotypical 'manly idea, fitting with the author's outlook. He is well paced and clear. The audio is a little frustrating with every single chapter (which are only a few minutes long) starting with 'chapter xxxx, law xxxx'. It didn't need the chapter numbers, because the law numbers made it clear it was a new chapter.

This book was given to me for free at my request and I provided this review voluntarily.