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Kingsley

Henely Brook, Australia
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  • Amped

  • A Kid Sensation Companion Novel
  • By: Kevin Hardman
  • Narrated by: Elizabeth Klett
  • Length: 5 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 112
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 105
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 103

Electra - the beautiful, unflappable girlfriend of teen super Kid Sensation - headlines her own adventure for the first time. A foundling adopted and raised by the Alpha League (the world's greatest superhero team), Electra has exhibited super powers since infancy. However, her past has remained a mystery for the most part, with those few people with any knowledge of her background being reluctant to talk.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I have got a Sensation Complex for Electra

  • By Ray Johnson on 04-22-18

When the kid is away....

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-18-19

While Kid Sensation is offworld his girlfriend, Electra, gets to take the spotlight in her own story. Amped puts Electra front and centre as she goes on a mission of discovery. Orphaned as a child, with no real knowledge of her parents, she goes in search of who she is and who he family was. A path that will take her down roads she may not wish to go, and into the path of one of the most dangerous super villains in history.

Other than the fact that Kid Sensation is a thing, and is currently off world, there isn't too much you need to know jumping into this story. It can be standalone, although it does give some information that may be spoilers for earlier Kid Sensation books. Nothing major, but enough to be cautious. Unlike the Mouse side story, this one takes place in the present, concurrent with the KS books. It is not a prequel.

Overall it is an enjoyable, quick story that expands the Kid sensation universe.

Narration by Elizabeth Klett is good. Well paced, engaging and interesting. Great to listening to, and filled with energy and various characters voices and emotions.

This book was given to me for free at my request and I provided this review voluntarily.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Sea of Galilee Boat

  • Ed Rachal Foundation Nautical Archaeology Series
  • By: Shelley Wachsmann
  • Narrated by: Charles Henderson Norman
  • Length: 9 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 5
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 5
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 5

On a cold, cloudy day in early February 1985, Shelley Wachsmann, then resident nautical archaeologist for the Israel Department of Antiquities and Museums, drove to Kibbutz Ginosar, an agricultural settlement near the shores of the Sea of Galilee. Two brothers, avid amateur archaeologists, had found a boat buried in the lake, its outlines revealed by receding lake waters. The boat was "possibly ancient," according to the handwritten note placed on Wachsmann's desk a day or two before.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Discovery, preservation, excavation and history

  • By Kingsley on 03-18-19

Discovery, preservation, excavation and history

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-18-19

The Jesus Boat - that is what this Galilea Boat became known as in popular media, much to the team working on its chagrin. The boat is a 1st century Galilean boat used for fishing - much like that which Jesus would have used - but highly unlikely to be the one in which he actually was. But the idea it could be was latched on in the media and some people's minds.

Discovered in the 1980's, during a drought, this book tells the story of its excavation, protection and movement into a controlled environment. The book alternates between telling the gruelling story of protecting the extremely fragile boat while trying to move it, and the history of the 1st century Galilean area. told by experts on the removal team, with historians filling in the 1st century details it is an extremely interesting read for fans of both history and of the technical details of excavation, preservation and restoration.

Charles Henderson Norman does well with narration. This is the second or third book of his related to restoration that I have listened to and he is good at the genre. He is clear and makes even the most complex and difficult sections easy to follow. He talks slightly faster than most narrators I have listened to, but this is not a significant issue at all.

Worth checking out.

This book was given to me for free at my request and I provided this review voluntarily.

  • Wraith Knight

  • By: C. T. Phipps
  • Narrated by: Peter Berkrot
  • Length: 10 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 32
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 32
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 32

The King Below, Enemy of the World, is dead. Will his successor save the world...or rule it? Jacob Riverson was once the greatest hero of an age. Cut down during what should have been the final battle against the King Below, he was condemned to centuries of torment as a Wraith Knight in the service of said monster. With the destruction of his master, Jacob finds his free will returning and discovers he is in a world torn by civil war between the King Below's former slaves and the heroes who "saved" them.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Waking up as the bad guy

  • By Kingsley on 03-18-19

Waking up as the bad guy

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-18-19

Jacob Riverson is a knight, one of the 'good guys'. But when he dies in battle he finds himself reborn as a wraith knights - one of the bad guys, and the enemies he was sworn to fight. Plus he has a trickster god talking in his ear. Now he must deal with being a bad guy, and the knowledge of what he has done.

My prior knowledge of CT Phipps work is from the self aware Supervillainy series.A series that is full of knowing winks to other, more mainstream, comic worlds. This is not that. This is a series take on the fantasy genre. While it is built on the works that have come before (Tolkien's Ring Wraiths do come to mind at times) it doesn't have that fourth wall breaking wink-wink to the audience going. If you are looking for more of that from Phipps, this isnt it.

But it is enjoyable. Like the Supervillainy series Phipps has a strong emphasis on character and relationships. How the characters work together and grow together is important. There are not short sections of the book devoted to discussions about feelings and relationships. There is also magic, and war and battle.

The writing is clunky in places. One example is at one point the main character literally asks everyone else to 'tell their backstory'. Backstory is a term very much used by writers and readers around characters, but coming form an actual character within the story it felt really out of place. It might have worked in the more meta Supervillainy books, but here it does not.

Narration by Peter Berkrot is good. It took me a bit to get used to the voice. He sounded much older than I expected for the way the character presents at first, but I adjusted (as did the character) and in the end I enjoyed it. Well paced and engaging, he varies throughout to keep it clear what is going on and who is talking.

This book was given to me for free at my request and I provided this review voluntarily.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Junk

  • By: Les Bohem
  • Narrated by: John Waters
  • Length: 10 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 3,347
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 3,091
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 3,087

Set in present-day Los Angeles, Junk explores an epic conspiracy, one at work for thousands of years that involves total takeover of the planet Earth by aliens. In the wild, souped-up vision of Les Bohem - the acclaimed, Emmy-winning writer of the Steven Spielberg miniseries, Taken - the world is at the end stage of long-range plot that involves a gigantic genetic-engineering project. The aliens who have invaded us have no planet. No spaceship is coming. Instead, a small advance force comes, breeds, and dies - thus becoming an anomaly in our DNA that can’t be explained.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Consider the narrator, and buckle up

  • By D. L. Fields on 03-05-19

Flat narration on a boring story

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-02-19

This is my least favourite original I have listen to to date. I struggled through to the end, not wanting to give up and hoping it came together into something worthwhile.

In the end it doesn't. Its not good. Its not bad per we. It just is. I came away not having cared about a single thing that happened or a single character. There was no excitement, no interest, no engaging or different story here.

The story itself is about a hidden alien agenda, bringing about the end of the world as we know it. It follows a whole lot of people as they discover the conspiracy and try to prevent it.

The story introduces a lot of characters very quickly, none of which stayed with me or made me care about them. They do things. Or not. Who cares? Who remembers?

Half the things in the book that happen or are discussed have to barring on the story or the outcome. And other parts are undercooked, never fully explaining what is going on.

Maybe the writing would work for TV or screenplays, which is where I understand the author is from. Things could be seen don't need to be described. but here it is bland and/or lacking.

I have no particular issue with violence, sex or vulgarity in stories, but it has to serve a point. And here it does not. It is there for the sake or getting a reaction or being edgy.

The narration doesn't do it any favours either, with every person sounds the same. So its hard to follow conversations or tell who is who.

There is variation for action and emotion, but it matters little if you can't tell, or don't care about who is involved.

182 of 209 people found this review helpful

  • The Demon Next Door

  • By: Bryan Burrough
  • Narrated by: Steve White
  • Length: 2 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 8,528
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 7,672
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 7,635

Best-selling author Bryan Burrough recently made a shocking discovery: The small town of Temple, Texas, where he had grown up, had harbored a dark secret. One of his high school classmates, Danny Corwin, was a vicious serial killer. In this chilling tale, Burrough raises important questions of whether serial killers can be recognized before they kill or rehabilitated after they do. It is also a story of Texas politics and power that led the good citizens of the town of Temple to enable a demon who was their worst nightmare.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fascinating and Horrible Story. Expertly Narrated.

  • By Lynn Norris on 03-04-19

Less sensational than advertised

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-01-19

Right now serial killer true crime history is a booming industry. Audible Originals adds to the growing collection of stories with 'The Demon Next Door', the story of serial rapist and murderer of three women, Daniel Lee Corwin.

The blurb for the book suggests a giant cover up and conspiracy, an attempt by a town to ignore and/or hide the crimes. This is not the case.

The first attempted rape, in the 1970s, was prosecuted. There is some disbelief that the person could have done it, but no conspiracy to bury the story like it is suggested. There is some suggestion of victim blaming but some members of the community, as attitudes towards victims sucks in the 1970s, but this is not a special case. The town wanted to forget about it, not because they were protecting Corwin, but because they wanted to move on from the torrid issue and not have it skew the review of the town forever.

This original crime sees Corwin convicted, and he goes to jail. When he gets out in the 1980s (having only serves a quarter of his sentence) he goes on to attack more people, killing three. The fact he did this isn't the fault of the town. There was no conspiracy to hid his first actions, and that certainly didn't lead to a lighter conviction or his next actions.

As for the final question of the blurb, 'Why had local law enforcement been unable to solve and prosecute his murders as they continued?' again it wanst' a conspiracy or a cover up. It was that evidence doesn't match him, descriptions from eye witnesses pointed away from him, his alibis are good, and so forth. General police procedural reasons.

The story of Corwin is interesting, and it is in here is some fairly gory details, but it is not what is advertised.

'The Demon Next Door' is the story of the Corwin, with lots of quotes by people who knew him or were involved in the case. But it is not a collection of audio interviews with a guide filling in between. It is a single piece of writing, read by a single narrator. So more of a traditional audiobook experience, compared to a lot of the NPR/podcast styles that Originals often are.

Narration by Steve White is okay. Nothing outstanding. He reads it fairly straight forwardly, in a well paced, clear voice. There is some enthusiasm, emotion and energy where appropriate, but no variation for quotes or things said by individuals. So sometimes it is not completely clear if the things being said are the author/guide vs being a quote.

[If you enjoy this review please check out my other reviews. I review a lot of small press and indie books - support the small guys and you may find something new you will love]

210 of 225 people found this review helpful

  • Sakina's Restaurant

  • By: Aasif Mandvi
  • Narrated by: Aasif Mandvi
  • Length: 1 hr and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 1,712
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,570
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars 1,568

Sakina's Restaurant breathes new life into an age old story: the emotive tale of an immigrant coming to New York in pursuit of the American dream. Actor, comedian, and writer Aasif Mandvi originally performed his Obie Award-winning solo show off-Broadway 20 years ago. This past October, the iconic play was reimagined and produced by Audible for a limited run at Minetta Lane Theatre in the West Village of Manhattan. Recorded for an Audible-exclusive audience, listeners can forgo the price of admission and embark on the cross-cultural journey with Mandvi.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Immigration and the American Dream

  • By Kingsley on 03-01-19

Immigration and the American Dream

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-01-19

'Sakinas Restaurant tells the story of a family who moved from India to the USA to pursue the American Dream
Man moving from India to NYC to start a restaurant. It talks about the hardship of setting up, and then the second generation losing sight of that and feeling like they are losing the original Indian culture of the family.

The play covers multiple different clashes of culture. That of coming to America from another country, clashes between parents from the old culture and those brought up in the new, kids trying to live in line with culture and belief but being overwhelmed by American culture and desires. It is inter-generational and cultural conflict, and dealing with the fact the the American dream often does not play out in reality how the dream was envisioned.

While it was written 20 years ago, and some things have aged in it (mention of a Nintendo Gameboy for one) the conflicts and the issues are still relevant today.

Nothing groundbreaking in it's content (although it might have been when written 20 years ago) it is still entertaining.

Aasif Mandvi plays multiple parts - effectively several different monologues or one half of a conversation (that we don't hear the other side of). It is hard at times to know exactly who Aasif is playing at anyone one time, and that characters relationship to the others, but a discerning listener should be able to work it out reasonably easy.

Mandvi plays the father coming across to the US (with a heavy Indian accent), and then other characters like the daughter (with an American accent, but not sounding in any way feminine) and son years later. If you can ignore the fact that the daughter does not sound even slightly feminine, the performance is really good. It is full of emotion and energy. It ranges from excitement, to anger, happiness, fear, sadness and so on. It is engaging throughout.

The audio includes music (some minor stuff added between scenes, and some that is clearly meant to be background actually heard by the characters) and sound effects (planes, people talking in background/crown noises, computer games etc). They are there, but for the most part aren't overwhelming or distracting. I also feel they didn't really add anything. You can taken them or leave them, and personally I prefer they would have just left them out.

[If you enjoy this review please check out my other reviews. I review a lot of small press and indie books - support the small guys and you may find something new you will love]


85 of 93 people found this review helpful

  • A Mind of Her Own

  • By: Paula McLain
  • Narrated by: Hillary Huber
  • Length: 1 hr and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 7,051
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,346
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 6,320

Paris, 1893. Twenty-five-year-old Marie Sklodowska is studying science at the Sorbonne - one of the only universities in the world that has begun to admit women. A thousand miles from her native Poland, with no money and the odds stacked against any woman daring to pursue a career in such a rigorous field, Marie throws herself into her studies. She's certain that to succeed in a man's world, she will have to go it alone. Her meticulous plans get thrown slightly off-course when Marie attracts the attention of an accomplished young physicist, himself on the precipice of greatness.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Based on a true story

  • By Kingsley on 03-01-19

Based on a true story

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-01-19

'A Mind of Her Own' is a first person dramatisation of the early life of Marie Curie, chemist, physicist and pioneer on the study radiation. Curie (at this point being Maria Salomea Skłodowska as she had not yet married Pierre Curie) is young female scientist, studying in Paris, at a time when females doing science was looked down on. Females were not given any independence in the late 19th century Paris, so her undertaking studies was often looked down on by those males around her. through her own skill and determination, and with the help of some teachers and colleagues who could look beyond her gender, she was able to make incredible strides in science and eventually win the 1903 Nobel Prize in Physics (with her husband) and the 1911 Nobel prize in chemistry (in her own right).

The story a romance story as well as a biopic of an impressive scientific mind. It does focus on her studies and the hardships, especially those faced due to her being a female, but the story is strongly linked to the story of Pierre Curie and their burgeoning romance. That is really what the book is about. Much of the internal dialogue is Marie feeling she will lose that love of science, or have to play second fiddle to Pierre, if she falls for him. The story is about reconciling those things.

Much like biopic movies there is liberty taken with the story, for the sake of drama and keeping it moving. As it is told in a first person point of view we get reactions and thoughts when we may not actually know what she was thinking (although maybe she wrote copious diaries and we do know). Without knowing her history beyond the basics it's hard to know if the other students are real people and events, or just archetypes to show the sort of reaction and hardship she endured. Are the events and thoughts between Marie and Pierre based on fact or just creations by the author to create drama. Really it doesn't matter, as you do learn about the time, the relationship and her pursuit of science.

I honestly felt it a bit short, although very good. Where it ends is a reasonable place to end, as it is a turning point in her life. But if you don't know about her future after it ends, the work she did, and the recognition she got for it (and not just for her work with Pierre) then it leaves it off in a strange place that feels unresolved. Basically the big impact of the decision is left off the story, and only there for those who know more about Marie Curies life.

Hillary Huber does great narration. He is engaging and enjoyable to listen to. she provides voices for all the characters, including various accents - French, Polish etc. I do find it a little strange that all the characters are given accents except for the French-Polish Marie Curie herself, who speaks and thinks in an American accent. It might give the impression to some that she is an American in Europe, not a European herself.

The audio is straight forward, beyond Huber's great narration. No sound effects, no music. Just clean, clear, enjoyable performance.

[If you enjoy this review please check out my other reviews. I review a lot of small press and indie books - support the small guys and you may find something new you will love]

190 of 197 people found this review helpful

  • After Watergate

  • The Renaissance of Richard Nixon
  • By: Michael A. Endicott
  • Narrated by: Benjamin McLean
  • Length: 6 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 5
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 5
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 5

This is a story about politics, history, and power. But, most of all, this is a story about a working-class kid from the south side of Tacoma, Washington, who became a Secret Service agent and traveled the world, building a relationship with one of America’s most controversial Presidents, Richard Nixon, and Mrs. Nixon. This is a story about perseverance and friendship - and a story no one else can tell.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Another side of the President

  • By Kingsley on 02-22-19

Another side of the President

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-22-19

Nixon is often the villain in whatever piece is is in. The man who believed that the President should be able to do whatever he wants and it should never be called illegal, the man who covered up many political indiscretions, and who resigned before he could be impeached. This book tells a different side to him.

Told by the head of his secret service detail, who became his chief of staff, and considered himself a friend to the Nixons, this book tells of Nixon after he left the White House. It is a personalizing, softening story, to change the 'villain' into an actual human. Showing his personal side, and going through details of what he did post Presidency.

It is not told in strict chronological order, but instead follows themes in chapters and moves about their post-Presidency lives. Stories of family, gatherings of friends, interactions with the public, going to sporting events and so many other 'normal' things. It also covers some not so normal things he did, such as under the table discussions with Russia. It tells of Endicott's interactions with the KGB during this time, as well as other events.

There is nothing ground breaking or scandalous or even overly surprising in here. It's interesting, but more than that is mostly just feels down-to-earth and normal. It goes a long way to demystifying the boogeyman idea of Nixon.

Narration by Benjamin McLean is fine. Possibly more of a 3.5 and a 4, but good either way. Well paced, clear, interesting. Keeps you engaged with the text. Nothing outstanding, and there isn't really much here to flex his capabilities. It is a simple, solid performance from him.

This book was given to me for free at my request and I provided this review voluntarily.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • War on Sacred Grounds

  • By: Ron E. Hassner
  • Narrated by: Charles Henderson Norman
  • Length: 7 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 1

Sacred sites offer believers the possibility of communing with the divine and achieving deeper insight into their faith. Yet their spiritual and cultural importance can lead to competition as religious groups seek to exclude rivals from practicing potentially sacrilegious rituals in the hallowed space and wish to assert their own claims. 

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Extremely well researched and dense

  • By Kingsley on 02-19-19

Extremely well researched and dense

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-19-19

'War on Sacred Grounds' is a very dense and detailed look at fights over sacred sights. It is not about religious wars (such as the crusades) but is about the battles and wars fought over specific locations; locations considered to be important to the religion.

Hassner sets up the book by detailing what exactly is a sacred space, and how that changes and (often) grows over time. He looks at what defines a sacred space and why it is important, with criteria such as the space being indivisible – it cannot be split and shared, for various religious reasons. Reasons with then become political reasons and grow well beyond the original conflict. For example the sacred space of the temple mount in Jerusalem grows over time and the importance and the fight stops being about that one individual spot but becomes about the whole city. The entirety of Jerusalem becomes a de facto sacred space in the eyes of the religions that are fighting over it. The political and the religious become inexplicably entwined.

The entire book looks at the issue through the lens of three contrasting, but not contradictory, ideas: materialist (looking at the political ramifications of bargaining over an indivisible space), interpretist (looking at the significance of the space to the believers) and constructivist (the role of leaders in shaping these spaces).

The book details why mismanagement of the conflict happens so often. Using various examples he points out where failures have previously occurred and points to potential causes. Often it comes to a lack of an understanding of the actual problem, treating the symptoms without understanding the cause, or due to a lack of religious awareness. One example has a hostile situation being broken up by military force, without the military force realising they were doing it on a religiously important day, which thus increased the tensions rather than relieved them

Hassner goes through two big case studies showing where there was some level of successful conflict management - Jerusalem in 1967 and Mecca in 1979. He goes through the history of the event, in a detailed and entertaining way. Meccas in 1979 was particularly engaging to me, as it was one that I knew very little about at all and provided great insight into the various groups and sects within Islam and the region. While Islam forbids any violence within the Grand Mosque, an Imam was able change and shape the rules of the religion to allow for the standoff to end. While it was a violent end, Hassner explains how it can still be seen a successful resolution in some ways.

These subjects addressed in my review only barely touches on much of the content here. It is a dense book, but well worth taking the time to go through it. Is it perfect? No. Buut any issue with it I found to be minor in comparison to the depth of knowledge and insight provided.

Narration by Charles Henderson Norman took a little bit to get used to. Initially he reminded me of an old timey radio presenter, but once I got used to it I really enjoyed it. He is a little quicker paced than most narrators, which combined with the density of the book, meant I had to slow it down slightly from my normal pace. Over all he is clear and engaged with the text and enjoyable to listen to.

This book was given to me for free at my request and I provided this review voluntarily.

  • The Last Stand of the Great Texas Packrat: A Tale of Books and Obsession

  • By: Steve Vernon
  • Narrated by: Derek Dysart
  • Length: 25 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 3

Texas Jack Page, on the eve of his 48th birthday, emptied his last seven cartons of books, placing them volume by volume across his front door - a one-man human cask of Amontillado interring himself inside a shining silver Airstream trailer sized aluminum tomb of tomes.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Short and sharp

  • By Kingsley on 02-13-19

Short and sharp

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-13-19

The Last Stand of the Great Texas Packrat tells the story of 'Texas Jack Page' an trailer park man and collector of books. He has thousands, ranging from rarities to beloved classics to special one of a kinds (such as signed books, or a book 'borrowed' from a President). Texas Jack is known all over the internet as a fine collector of books, but in his life he is a reclusive man, living in a trailer and battling the weight of his history.

It's a much different story to most of the Steve Vernon books I have read. This is a literary work, compared to the horror or humour I have previously seen from him.

The book is abut the magic of books, the ability for them to take you away and create a world for you. To live in and be enveloped by. It's a ode to the love of books. But it's also about how that is a two edge sword, where you can live for your books and escape from the world, to the detriment of your work.

Narration by Derek Dysart is good. Nothing outstanding, but there is little in this book to allow him to show his range and ability. there is little to no dialogue. He is clear and well paced. No issues. So enjoyable and a solid performance.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful