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Louis Macareo

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  • Principles

  • Life and Work
  • By: Ray Dalio
  • Narrated by: Ray Dalio, Jeremy Bobb
  • Length: 16 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,314
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,847
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,788

Ray Dalio, one of the world's most successful investors and entrepreneurs, shares the unconventional principles that he's developed, refined, and used over the past 40 years to create unique results in both life and business - and which any person or organization can adopt to help achieve their goals.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Idea-meritocracy/Principles Reference

  • By Patrick Eberle on 06-30-18

Not bad, but long.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-05-19

I recognize that this was a labor of love for the author and he makes dozens or more good points, but I would recommend (as he does), skipping the first 9 chapters. There ARE good ideas here, but he could have cut the book by 20% if he just said that he loves computers and algorithms to substantialy aid in making decisions. Anyway, some good points about hiring and firing that I thought were some of the strongest of the book, along with the importance of governance.

  • Leaders Eat Last

  • Why Some Teams Pull Together and Others Don't
  • By: Simon Sinek
  • Narrated by: Simon Sinek
  • Length: 8 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,559
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,141
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,066

Why do only a few people get to say "I love my job?" It seems unfair that finding fulfillment at work is like winning a lottery; that only a few lucky ones get to feel valued by their organizations, to feel like they belong. Imagine a world where almost everyone wakes up inspired to go to work, feels trusted and valued during the day, then returns home feeling fulfilled. This is not a crazy, idealized notion. Today, in many successful organizations, great leaders are creating environments in which people naturally work together to do remarkable things.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent message but poor solution

  • By Troyus on 09-03-14

Awesome . . . Just Awesome.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-02-19

don't you hate when you go to write a review and then you accidentally delete the whole thing and have to try to recreate your Genius? In any case why some teams pull together and wind some don't is not a complicated matter. We all know how we like to be lead and how we like to be treated in order to perform at our best but somehow we forget that limber in a leadership role which is always and don't put into practice the simple things that we already know work. well there is a lot of difficulty and subtlety at the detail level of implementation most of the businesses we work for in the culture that they purport fail at the simplest levels do not create a culture of trust empathy in a circle of safety. I won't say more. just buy this book, read it, digest it, love it, live it.

  • Facts and Fears

  • Hard Truths from a Life in Intelligence
  • By: Trey Brown, James R. Clapper
  • Narrated by: Mark Bramhall
  • Length: 18 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,840
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,680
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,678

When he stepped down in January 2017 as the fourth US Director of National Intelligence, James Clapper had been President Obama's senior intelligence advisor for six and a half years, longer than his three predecessors combined. He led the US Intelligence Community through a period that included the raid on Osama bin Laden, the Benghazi attack, the leaks of Edward Snowden, and Russia's influence operation on the 2016 US election.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Speaking Straight, Unbiased Truth to Power

  • By Cynthia on 05-29-18

Good chronicle of a half a century of IC history

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-01-19

this book provided an excellent Chronicle of the last 50 years of intelligence community history but was a little bit short in terms of sharing tradecraft 4 lessons that could be applied a sense of wisdom or how to pursue policy. James Clapper is clearly an honorable individual and we owe him a great debt of service for his continued efforts to speak truth to power. Facebook provides an interesting insight into someone who sat at the table of some of the most trying and controversial intelligent topics of the day but I was left wanting more

  • The Last Days of August

  • By: Jon Ronson
  • Narrated by: Jon Ronson
  • Length: 3 hrs and 43 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 11,317
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,283
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 10,270

In December 2017 the famous porn star August Ames committed suicide in a park in the Conejo Valley. It happened a day after she’d been the victim of a pile-on, via Twitter, by fellow porn professionals - punishment for her tweeting something deemed homophobic. A month later, August’s husband, Kevin, connected with Jon Ronson to tell the story of how Twitter bullying killed his wife. What neither Kevin nor Ronson realized was that Ronson would soon hear rumors and secrets hinting at a very different story - something mysterious and unexpected and terrible.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • a healing masterpiece

  • By A. M. on 01-04-19

Wow. A little self-righteous but Wow.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-25-19

Forget the world they examine. The real take home message is how everyone is fighting battles we know nothing about. How we all see the world differently and inaccurately and how we should all be kinder. Just a little kinder.

  • Power Moves

  • Lessons from Davos
  • By: Adam Grant
  • Narrated by: Adam Grant
  • Length: 3 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,268
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,951
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,913

Power is changing. Private corner offices and management by decree are out, as is unquestioned trust in the government and media. These former pillars of traditional power have been replaced by networks of informed citizens who collectively wield more power over their personal lives, employers, and worlds than ever before. So how do you navigate this new landscape and come out on top?  Adam Grant, Wharton organizational psychologist, went to the World Economic Forum in Davos, the epicenter of power, and sat down with thought leaders from around the world, to find out.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Disorganized

  • By mike a on 01-16-19

Completely Rocked

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-24-19

This was an eclectic and really informative look at leadership, motivation and the future. It flowed very well and is a good example of what an audio presentation can be. I am thoroughly pleased.

  • Skin in the Game

  • No Longer Just a C-Level Employee
  • By: Jim Gilreath
  • Narrated by: Curt Simmons
  • Length: 11 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars 2
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1

This audiobook is the definitive resource for learning the tricks of the trade and potential pitfalls in the hiring process as well as how to conduct an effective skin-in-the-game C-Suite job search. Skin in the Game is about middle-market private equity hiring of C-Suite executives coupled with the author's unique due diligence screening process.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Good in its genre

  • By Louis Macareo on 01-22-19

Good in its genre

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-22-19

I was really just looking for a book on how to prepare and seek a new job and to conduct interviews and I came across this book because of a similar book on leadership I'm thinking called Skin In the game it was not very good. I found this current book interesting even though it was outside of my field and the general tips on how to prepare for job interviews and to seek employment overall very good despite being buried in a sea of detail that I think would be very helpful for those in the exact Market that this book is about.

  • Skin in the Game

  • Hidden Asymmetries in Daily Life
  • By: Nassim Nicholas Taleb
  • Narrated by: Joe Ochman
  • Length: 8 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,921
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,550
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,530

In his most provocative and practical book yet, one of the foremost thinkers of our time redefines what it means to understand the world, succeed in a profession, contribute to a fair and just society, detect nonsense, and influence others. Citing examples ranging from Hammurabi to Seneca, Antaeus the Giant to Donald Trump, Nassim Nicholas Taleb shows how the willingness to accept one's own risks is an essential attribute of heroes, saints, and flourishing people in all walks of life.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliance smothered by Condescension and Petty Squabbling

  • By Jeremy on 03-11-18

Even a stopped clock is right 2x a day, but more

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-21-19

I find him shallow . . .bordering on Trump like idiocy. He is frequently straight up wrong. He misunderstands and mocks many people who have a demonstrated track record of rigorous thinking. The longer his list grows of people he does not like, the more certain I am that he is blinded by his own duning kruger effect. He thinks because he knows math and greek and because he has skin in the game that he is somehow smarter and more correct than others. He does not know what he does not know. He makes conclusory statements instead of asking questions. He is certain about EVERYTHING whereas a rational person has varying levels of confidence depending on the topic. He occasionally stumbles across a basic idea that is worth adding to one's lists of things to keep in mind, but he makes the mistake of thinking those things are dispositive on whatever issue and that anyone who does not see the world as he does is too smart for their own good. Imagine that you understood football only in terms of what worked to score more points. Do you think that you would understand the game merely because you understand the most important metric but nothing else? He is one of these people who apply the same lens to every endeavor of man. For example, if you understand how to take a calculated risk on 4th down, does that mean you understand how to take a calculated risk with 2 outs? . . . . His errors are too numerous to mention. His math may be correct often, but his understanding of the topics he covers that I know well is so shallow that I think it is likely that his knowledge on other things or maybe even as a trader, are equally as shallow. If he got lucky a few times in the market, does that mean that he understands it? Does a player make a better coach necesarily? A better announcer? Sometimes, but not always. If someone gets married at age 19 and stays married their whole life in a successful marriage, does that make them a better expert at understanding women than someone who has dated 100 women? Maybe, but you can see the faulty reasoning that assumes this is true.
It is not that he is ALWAYS wrong and it was worth the read to have his perspective as ONE perspective, but mostly where he was correct (in my estimation) it was almost by chance. He is also so enamored with the pureness and almost holiness of the risk taking entrpreneur (where are these people?) that he equated them with soldiers and he believes that almost by default, what they do is correct, even though many other parts of the book counter his own conclusions.
If one views the kind of knowledge he thinks is superior as just another type of knowledge, then people solely with this knowledge also suffer limitations in their thinking. Plus he goes after his targets in a way that is more flailing than with direct punches. And really this is the key thing that makes me doubt his conclusions. He is all over the place, sloppy and shallow. If his best effort to demonstrate his thinking is a book, then he has demonstrated that he is a scattered and unfocused thinker.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Road to Character

  • By: David Brooks
  • Narrated by: Arthur Morey, David Brooks
  • Length: 12 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,301
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 2,005
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,989

With the wisdom, humor, curiosity, and sharp insights that have brought millions of readers to his New York Times column and his previous best sellers, David Brooks has consistently illuminated our daily lives in surprising and original ways. In The Social Animal, he explored the neuroscience of human connection and how we can flourish together. Now, in The Road to Character, he focuses on the deeper values that should inform our lives.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Rich, textured stories

  • By Amazon Customer on 05-25-15

First and Last Chapter Worthy

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-27-18

The book has a beautiful and I would argue, true premise. It begins ambitiously though the words Adam 1 and Adam 2 themselves are distracting. However, the collection of biographies meant to support the thesis fall a little flat and many of them drift from the central theme though the vignettes of these lives IS motivating and reassurring. The final chapter gives a summation of the key points and if you can accept these without proof, you can save yourself many hours of almost wasted time between the introduction and the final chapter.

  • Happy

  • Why More or Less Everything Is Absolutely Fine
  • By: Derren Brown
  • Narrated by: Derren Brown
  • Length: 14 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 153
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 148
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 148

Across the millennia, philosophers have thought long and hard about happiness. They have defined it in many different ways and come up with myriad strategies for living the good life. Drawing on this vast body of work, in Happy Derren Brown explores changing concepts of happiness - from the surprisingly modern wisdom of the Stoics and Epicureans in classical times right up until today, when the self-help industry has attempted to claim happiness as its own. He shows how many of self-help’s suggested routes to happiness and success - such as positive thinking, self-belief and setting goals - can be disastrous to follow and, indeed, actually cause anxiety. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A witty and thoughtful take on stoicism

  • By Sam Russell on 04-07-19

Love this book. Loved it.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-24-18

I was expecting much much less from this book and maybe if all of life is about expectation management than that is why I'm so happy with it, but I think it is more than that. The author takes on way more than a superficial journey through the major schools of philosophy and most of the big names in the history of thinkerswho have written about happiness, how to achieve it and what it is. While his main focus is on the Stoics and cognitive behavioral therapy, which admittedly I have a penchant for, he does not simply leave it there. Derren justifies and supports his ideas as to why he believes in these approaches and then rounds them each out with additional commentary. In the end we are left with a picture of life that is not boring, nor requires deep suffering and neither does it subscribe to the philosophy that we must always be happy like a AAA battery and that we can control things that we cannot control. Very simply the book was eminently reasonable, practical and I might also say quite funny and Derren's delivery due no doubt to his years of practice on the stage. Overall a simply wonderful wonderful book.

  • On Grand Strategy

  • By: John Lewis Gaddis
  • Narrated by: Mike Chamberlain
  • Length: 11 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 535
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 470
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 464

For over 20 years, a select group of Yale undergraduates has been admitted into the year-long "Grand Strategy" seminar team-taught by John Lewis Gaddis and Paul Kennedy. Its purpose: to provide a grounding in strategic decision-making in the face of crisis to prepare future American leaders for important work. Now, John Lewis Gaddis has transposed the experience of that course into a wonderfully succinct, lucid and inspirational book, a view from the commanding heights of statesmanship across the landscape of world history from the ancient Greeks to Lincoln, and beyond.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Interesting, but fails to offer real lessons.

  • By Zack on 07-04-18

Ambitious. Great middle. Ends with a Wimper

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-05-18

Overall I found this book intriguing and useful. It starts slow and ends weakly, but at full stride uses fantastic examples and counter-examples to teach some age old truths, and subtle ones at that, on Grand Strategy. It largely accomplishes its goals. Certainly it makes one think and to think strategicly, but it is limited when it gets bogged down in specific individuals too deeply. Worth the price of admission for sure.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful