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  • The Robots of Dawn

  • The Robot Series, Book 3
  • By: Isaac Asimov
  • Narrated by: William Dufris
  • Length: 15 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,434
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1,307
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,305

Detective Elijah Baiey is called to the Spacer world Aurora to solve a bizarre case of roboticide. The prime suspect is a gifted roboticist who had the means, the motive, and the opportunity to commit the crime. There's only one catch: Baley and his positronic partner, R. Daneel Olivaw, must prove the man innocent. For in a case of political intrigue and love between woman and robot gone tragically wrong, there's more at stake than simple justice. This time Baley's career, his life, and Earth's right to pioneer the Galaxy lie in the delicate balance.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Some of Audible and Asimov's Best

  • By thomas on 08-12-14

Good, not great

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-07-19

Not as good as the first two in the series. Asimov’s vision of a space-age future are fascinating, but his characters’ dialog are all flat, speaking much the way the author spoke, with little variation. His romantic scenes lead one to wonder if the man himself, great though he was, was not a robot. And, similar to the other two books, his version of water-tight whodunit logic and courtroom examination are absurdly unrealistic. All that said, the flaws don’t ruin the experience, merely tarnish it. The narrator performance is appropriate and skillful, with changes of voice per character, and an unforgettable portrayal of robotic characters, in particular.

  • Children of Time

  • By: Adrian Tchaikovsky
  • Narrated by: Mel Hudson
  • Length: 16 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 20,108
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18,749
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18,711

Adrian Tchaikovksy's critically acclaimed stand-alone novel Children of Time is the epic story of humanity's battle for survival on a terraformed planet. Who will inherit this new Earth? The last remnants of the human race left a dying Earth, desperate to find a new home among the stars. Following in the footsteps of their ancestors, they discover the greatest treasure of the past age - a world terraformed and prepared for human life. But all is not right in this new Eden.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fascinating Premise Within an Excellent Story

  • By Kurt Schwoppe on 07-30-17

Great, thoughtful scifi

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-27-17

I struggle to find good sci-fi that isn't just more of the same. This is a great example of creative, unique story telling with enough of a grounding in science to not be pure fantasy dross. Though very different in its telling and focus, it shares a kinship with Asimov, in that it looks to the future and tries to imagine something in the realm of possibility, and explains how that future might have come to pass, rather than just throwing in magic macguffins where needed. Highly recommended.

  • Metro 2033

  • By: Dmitry Glukhovsky
  • Narrated by: Rupert Degas
  • Length: 20 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,779
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,445
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,439

The year is 2033. The world has been reduced to rubble. Humanity is nearly extinct and the half-destroyed cities have become uninhabitable through radiation. Beyond their boundaries, they say, lie endless burned-out deserts and the remains of splintered forests. Survivors still remember the past greatness of humankind, but the last remains of civilisation have already become a distant memory. Man has handed over stewardship of the earth to new life-forms. A few score thousand survivors live on, not knowing whether they are the only ones left on Earth....

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • A bit tedious

  • By Checkers on 03-30-17

Almost gave up, glad I finished

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-04-17

Would you say that listening to this book was time well-spent? Why or why not?

Overall I am glad that I listened to this book. There were some points when I was second-guessing my selection and not enjoying the story due to some elements of the writing. As an example, the author at times rambles off into characters' daydreams or deeper thoughts, which, while interesting, are not always particularly consistent or believable for the character in question.

For example, some of the lines of thought explored by the main character seem far too sophisticated for the level of education and experience he is described as having, and seem to come through more as the author's own opinions on those subjects rather than the idle daydreams of a young man. The same occurs with some of the dialog of other secondary characters, wherein they are presented in one manner, then suddenly they are espousing a point of view that does not seem consistent with what had been presented beforehand.

Those complaints aside, there are some genuinely unique and memorable scenes in the book, and the story finished strong, which made up for my complaints. I am glad that I did not give up on the story and ask for a replacement book (which I was close to doing, about half way through).

How would you have changed the story to make it more enjoyable?

The author's use of Russian location names, while adding to authenticity, is very difficult to follow in an audio-only format for a listener who is not familiar with the language. Many of the metro station names are very similar and often mentioned in relation to each other in quick succession (e.g., sentences along the lines of 'first they went to station A, then from there to station B, and from there made their way to Station C,') which can make it difficult to follow. This likely is not an issue in print form.

Also, the author has a strange habit of using second-person phrasing when describing the experiences of the protagonist, which will bother the English grammar nerds out there (e.g., a scene in which Artyom enters a dark area, and the narration states something along the lines of 'it is so dark that you cannot see anything').

Which character – as performed by Rupert Degas – was your favorite?

Artyom is the main protagonist and also is the most realistic in terms of being a flawed character. Rupert Degas' performance of all the characters was varied and impressive, and the accents applied were very convincing to a listener with little exposure beyond the Hollywood version of a Russian accent. It was seldom difficult to tell which character was which as the performer gave each their own unique tones, inflections, and mannerisms.

Any additional comments?

There is a technical error early in one of the chapters wherein the brief "music" clip that bookends each chapter plays again, overlapping with the narrator's audio. I believe it was around chapter 10 or 12 when it occurred.

46 of 50 people found this review helpful