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Will

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Great Book. Must read to understand Putin

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-02-16

Well written. Fascinating details about Putin's relation ship with Presidents Clinton and Bush. I could not put it down.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

Great insights into Iran's 20th century history

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-15-16

This book makes it clear that we (the US) have often given up our principles for expediency. In the case of Iran, we have not just supported a dictator, we have actually destroyed a democracy to put our man in power. Our excuse: We were paranoid about the Soviet Union. When it comes to the Middle East, our foreign policy has been a disaster and it all started with Iran.

Clear, concise and accurate

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-08-16

Having lived 8 years under National Socialism and having escaped from the Socialist "Workers Paradise" of East Germany in 1953, I have to congratulate the author on a job well done. I have never seen or read a better description of what Socialism is, how it works and what it does to the people.

Unfortunately, the people, who are steering this country towards Socialism, are unlikely to read this book. History repeats itself, because most of us are ignorant of it.

9 of 12 people found this review helpful

Solution is a bit naive

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-07-16

Senator Lee is right on when it comes to the founders perspective of our Constitution and its subversion by a power hungry government. However, I don't share his hopes that a few good men can restore the powers, the federal government has extracted for itself, to the people. Jefferson was right: "The natural progress of things is for liberty to yield, and government to gain ground. This process is only reversible by a revolution."

6 of 7 people found this review helpful

Mixed Bag

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-15-16

I found the book funny, interesting and absorbing, but the author doesn't quite understand the high tech startup entrepreneurial culture. As an entrepreneur, I take exception to the idea that startup capital is plentiful and Stock Options in lieu of higher salary are exploitation. The average start-up raises $1 million or even less and cannot get going without everyone making some short term sacrifices. Dan thinks Uber should treat drivers using their service as employees - ridiculous! That's a Labor Union position unrelated to reality.

0 of 3 people found this review helpful

Well balanced perspective

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-02-16

This title gets past the propaganda from both sides and puts the Islam vs. Judeo-Christian history into a well balanced perspective.

"Outstanding story of the Berlin Wall"

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-26-14

This story is about the lives of people in Germany, the UK, the US, Poland and the USSR from the building of the Berlin Wall till its torn down. It seems well researched and is quite realistic, although I question the episode where Wally goes back to East Berlin to talk his girlfriend into escaping, after having successfully escaped and killed a border guard in the process. His anti conservative bias is evident in a few episodes. i.e. He accuses Barry Goldwater of being a racist and he gives credit for the collapse of the USSR only to Gorbachov, in contradiction to the generally prevailing view, especially abroad, that most of the credit goes to Ronal Reagan.

Outstanding story of the Berlin Wall

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-26-14

This story is about the lives of people in Germany, the UK, the US, Poland and the USSR from the building of the Berlin Wall till its torn down. It seems well researched and is quite realistic, although I question the episode where Wally goes back to East Berlin to talk his girlfriend into escaping, after having successfully escaped and killed a border guard in the process. His anti conservative bias is evident in a few episodes. i.e. He accuses Barry Goldwater of being a racist and he gives credit for the collapse of the USSR only to Gorbachov, in contradiction to the generally prevailing view, especially abroad, that most of the credit goes to Ronal Reagan.

Human Creativety creates Economic Growth

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-22-13

Economists usually talk in terms of supply & demand, return on investment, productivity, efficiency and so on; a rather materialistic approach. Humans are usually treated like machines, i.e. human capital or human resources.

In "Knowledge and Power", George Gilder takes a different tack to economic growth. According to Gilder, economic growth is a first order function of human Creativity. The Creator is the Entrepreneur. The Entrepreneur knows his field and has rapid access to the information he requires. Therefore, he has the Knowledge required to realize his idea. However, he also must have Power over his project so he'll be willing to take the risk and start a new business. If we give him the Power, he'll create jobs and grow the economy.

What an enlightening and simple concept. Give the Entrepreneur the Power to control his life and his project and he'll be off taking all kinds of risk to realize his dream. That means Power needs to be distributed to where the Knowledge is. If Power is centralized, bad decisions are made due to insufficient Knowledge and lack of skin in the game.

Geoge does not engage in a Zero Sum Game like Marxist economists. He does not endorse the Keynesian theory of Growth though stimulus, which is just another Zero Sum Game. He goes beyond Supply Side Economics. He puts human creativity front and center. When creativity lies dormant, there is stagnation.

Knowledge and Power is well researched. Gilder reviews many other books on the subject.

Growth = f(Entrepreneur + Knowledge + Information + Power)

4 of 5 people found this review helpful

Taleb's Recipe for a Free and Affluent Society

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-08-12

I had a lot of wonderful "Aha" moments listening to this audio book about Antifragile vs. Fragile systems. The author has identified a key underlying paradyne for failure or success, whether personal, in business or with government programs.

Long ago, another book: Leadership and the new science by Margaret Wheatley convinced me that nature is self organizing and business can be set up to be self organizing. Nassim Nicholas Taleb echo's that idea and states, the natural order is overwhelmingly Antifragile, while our manmade order tends to be Fragile. The earth and mankind have evolved all by themselves without some great leader calling the shots, because nature is Antifragile. If we listen/obey leaders who tell us how to live our own lives (which we already know intuitively and logically), we are likely to become Fragile.

Fragility is all about risks. An activity is Fragile, if the downside (negative) risks predominate over the upside risks or the downside risks are greater than the upsize risks. Fragile is the property of most manmade systems. How does that apply to us? Modernity has created structures that allows certain groups of people, like corporate bankers, politicians and academics to take excessive risks without any skin in the game and thereby pass the downside consequences onto others, making them Fragile. One way avoid this Nassim Nicholas Taleb argues, is to make ourselves Antifragile by insisting all decisions makers affecting our lives have skin in the game. However, bankers, politicians and academics usually have no skin in the game. In fact, often they gain at the expense of the people they serve. So the solution is, limit the size and power of banks, corporations and government to minimize the damage.

Taleb also points out that top down decisions by leaders who don't understand complex system, such as our economy, and have no skin in the game pass laws/regulations that make small problems large; for example our Financial Crisis:

1. The Federal Reserve made our financial system Fragile when it tried to prevent a small adjustment/recession by keeping interest rates too low and ended up causing a housing bubble plus the great recession.

2. Taxpayers became Fragile when large banks took excessive downside risk because the government protected the banks against that risk at taxpayer expense.

There is a bit of fluff in the book, but overall Taleb makes a great case limiting downsize risk and how we can achieve it. He deserves Nobel Prize.

24 of 32 people found this review helpful