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Kyle R Young

Melbourne
  • 7
  • reviews
  • 14
  • helpful votes
  • 149
  • ratings
  • Mindshift

  • Break Through Obstacles to Learning and Discover Your Hidden Potential
  • By: Barbara Oakley PhD
  • Narrated by: Barbara Oakley PhD
  • Length: 9 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 202
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 171
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 172

Mindshift reveals how we can overcome stereotypes and preconceived ideas about what is possible for us to learn and become. At a time when we are constantly being asked to retrain and reinvent ourselves to adapt to new technologies and changing industries, this book shows us how we can uncover and develop talents we didn't realize we had - no matter what our age or background.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Learning by anecdote

  • By Mark B. on 08-11-17

Really worthwhile

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-03-17

Some of the earlier reviews about the performance were far too harsh, I found it easy to listen to.

This is a good follow up to a mind for numbers, a book I really loved and found helpful.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Modern Romance

  • An Investigation
  • By: Aziz Ansari, Eric Klinenberg
  • Narrated by: Aziz Ansari, Eric Klinenberg
  • Length: 6 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 29,404
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 26,165
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 25,963

At some point every one of us embarks on a journey to find love. We meet people, date, get into and out of relationships, all with the hope of finding someone with whom we share a deep connection. This seems standard now, but it's wildly different from what people did even just decades ago. Single people today have more romantic options than at any point in human history.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Entertaining and informative

  • By ty on 08-23-15

Funny and insightful

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-23-15

This is hands down the best read by author narration, and a really funny, insightful and engaging book.

  • So You've Been Publicly Shamed

  • By: Jon Ronson
  • Narrated by: Jon Ronson
  • Length: 8 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 377
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 343
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 341

From the Sunday Times top ten bestselling author of The Psychopath Test, a captivating and brilliant exploration of one of our world's most underappreciated forces: shame. 'It's about the terror, isn't it? ''The terror of what?' I said.' The terror of being found out. 'For the past three years, Jon Ronson has travelled the world meeting recipients of high-profile public shamings. The shamed are people like us - people who, say, made a joke on social media that came out badly, or made a mistake at work.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Required Reading for Navigating Our Current Times

  • By Samantha on 07-17-16

Would definitely recommend

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-07-15

Another really enjoyable Jon Ronson title. I may be biased because I love his other books, but I found this really engaging and insightful.

  • The Happy Atheist

  • By: P. Z. Myers
  • Narrated by: Aron Ra
  • Length: 4 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 373
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 344
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 336

On his popular science blog, Pharyngula, PZ Myers has entertained millions of fans with his infectious love of evolutionary science and his equally infectious disdain for creationism, biblical literalism, intelligent design theory, and other products of godly illogic. This funny and fearless book collects and expands on some of his most popular writings, giving the religious fanaticism of our times the gleeful disrespect it deserves by skewering the apocalyptic fantasies, magical thinking, hypocrisies, and pseudoscientific theories advanced by religious fundamentalists of all stripes.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Entertaining

  • By shawn on 11-04-16

Takes no prisoners

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-08-15

This is a really irreverent and funny book, a guilty pleasure for an atheist rather than any serious attempt to convert anyone (although, that said, I really love the idea of using humour and ridicule to highlight and defeat some of the dangerously stupid ideas that are pushed on society), but a title I enjoyed immensely and laughed out loud many times while listening to.

I would thoroughly recommend.

4 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • The Locust Effect

  • Why the End of Poverty Requires the End of Violence
  • By: Gary A. Haugen, Victor Boutros
  • Narrated by: Arthur Morey
  • Length: 12 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 221
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 182
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 181

While the world has made encouraging strides in the fight against global poverty, there is a hidden crisis silently undermining our best efforts to help the poor. It is a plague of everyday violence. Beneath the surface of the world’s poorest communities, common violence—like rape, forced labor, illegal detention, land theft, police abuse and other brutality—has become routine and relentless. And like a horde of locusts devouring everything in their path, the unchecked plague of violence ruins lives, blocks the road out of poverty, and undercuts development.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Really worth listening to

  • By Adam Shields on 12-15-15

Challenging subject matter

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-08-15

This is a really confronting book at times, but yields amazing insights into the world we think we know and challenges your world view.

I was particularly stunned at the reality of violence against women and the poor in Bangalore, India- given the view in the developing world that it is India's silicon valley and a modern day economic miracle, and through work have daily interaction and dealings with this part of the world- to say this book has adjusted my worldview is an understatement.

While completely different in purpose, the magnitude of dissonance this inspired in my view of the world reminded me of "Man's search for meaning" by Viktor Frankl, in that you can't read this detailed summary of the effects of violence on the poor across the world and come away the same thinker as you were before- and what more could you ask for from a good non fiction book?

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Good Psychopath's Guide to Success

  • By: Andy McNab, Kevin Dutton
  • Narrated by: Andy McNab, Kevin Dutton
  • Length: 9 hrs and 25 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 143
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 127
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 128

If you are bored and unfulfilled by dry and overly worthy self-help manuals, then this is the audiobook for you! Listen to this and take a very different look at yourself! Former SAS hero Andy McNab and eminent psychologist Professor Kevin Dutton are unlikely partners. As Oxford academic and bestselling author of The Wisdom of Psychopaths, Kevin Dutton has plenty of experience of psychopaths, but he'd never met anyone quite like Andy McNab, decorated war hero and special forces warrior.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • I couldn't go the distance

  • By Michael on 06-19-15

Enjoyable, and you might learn a thing or two!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-07-15

I try not to be 'that guy' that tells everyone they should read x,y,z book, but I find myself repeatedly breaking my rule with all of Kevin Dutton's books, especially this one.

The format and interplay between the authors works brilliantly, and it's at once hugely entertaining and interesting. What more could you ask for? You won't be disappointed.

2 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Psychonomics

  • How Modern Science Aims to Conquer the Mind and How the Mind Prevails
  • By: Eric Robert Morse
  • Narrated by: James Foster
  • Length: 9 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 15
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 13
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 14

In Psychonomics, Morse uses captivating stories to bring to life the often mystifying world of behavioral psychology. We hear tales of beautiful fashion models and brilliant finance models, of MVP quarterbacks and GDP architects. In all of these stories, Morse shows how modern science uses the most advanced techne and experiments to defeat the human mind, and, ultimately, how the mind wins.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Best objective analysis on the subject

  • By Padman on 01-14-15

This book is a series of straw men

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-07-15

This is a terrible and dangerous book, and best characterised as the same kind of denialism that affirmed anti science groups draw on- I continued to read on in horror, so that I could in good conscience write a fair review to save you the trouble.

You shouldn't read this book, but if you do- listen to the first chapter through the filter of the following, and then return it for a refund if you agree with me.

The author claims to be a skeptic, but this is straight out of the denial playbook- some examples that characterise the entire book:

From the first chapter he constructs a straw man of behavioural economics to attack, while ironically attempting to point out all the logical fallacies the field suffers. Contrary to the authors opinion, behavioural economists do define rational, and they never claim that there aren't reasons for the heuristics and biases we see evidenced in their experiments or make value judgements like the author claims (he goes so far as to say that because there's reasons for these biases and some stories in which he shows that might actually work out in our favour, that this means we are clearly rational, and ergo behavioural economics is wrong)- but any cursory examination of the work produced by the field shows these biases do exist, do yield clear sub-optimal outcomes, and are easily replicated, yet all of this to the author constitutes a clear attack on the value of the wonderful and amazing human brain (which it should be noted is a kluge of parts cobbled together over our evolutionary history, not a perfectly optimised machine.)

The author moves the goalposts when talking about decision making and neuroscience, saying the studies have only been applied to simple decisions in a lab, and so can't be generalised to the wonders of more complex human decision making in natural environments- I'm sure when this research is done he'll find some other post hoc rationalisation to move the goal posts again. He also then tries to link this back to behavioural economics, railing against the straw man that not having clear free will is akin somehow to an argument that we are irrational beasts- I doubt any behavioural economist has ever made this claim.

The author claims the results of one very large and often repeated behavioural economics study (again... repeated hundreds of times) can't be trusted because there is a control group and a test group, and each participant is only given one scenario- the study might see different results if all participants were given both conditions (seriously- he actually argues this... Hence = denialism, not skepticism)- ignoring the obvious that this is how scientific experimental design works, and that we have rigorous statistical controls for exactly this kind of thing, in one of the books he criticises (Thinking fast and slow by Daniel Kahneman) there is actually a discussion of 'The Linda Problem' in which participants are essentially given both conditions and still make the logically incoherent choice- but the author ignores this because it doesn't suit his purpose: attacking the strawman he has constructed (or he didn't read/understand the subject material he attacks?)

The author generalises behavioural economics as being concerned only with judgements of economic value (i.e. money), and that humans are about more than money, so obviously they are wrong because he gives some supporting stories (seriously) that show that there's more to decisions than money. This is an obvious straw man, behavioural economics is concerned with utility, and even in studies looking solely at money, he fails to show why participants in these studies would be rational in not maximising their earnings when they showed up with the intention of participating for a monetary reward. He fails to address similar studies that show the same heuristics and biases in non monetary conditions- even though he attacks books and authors who talk extensively about said research.

3 of 9 people found this review helpful