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Marissa

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  • Guenhwyvar

  • A Tale from The Legend of Drizzt
  • By: R. A. Salvatore
  • Narrated by: Tom Felton
  • Length: 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 335
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 303
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 303

Actor Tom Felton ( Harry Potter) performs the origin story of Guenhwyvar, Drizzt's black panther companion and one of the more mysterious aspects of the Forgotten Realms.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • loved it :D

  • By Rebecca on 08-13-14

Quick but nice

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-13-17

A quick fun short story, which may not prove to be particularly memorable, but was enjoyable nonetheless. It's full of magic and unexpected loyalty. The inherent elegance, intelligence, and power of the panther supersedes the mage's intent to use her as nothing more than a tool. Josidiah, the intended recipient of this magical figurine tool, sees the intelligence of the panther and is reluctant to see her enslaved to his use.

I listened to Tom Felton's narration and was really pleased with how well he did as a narrator.

-Audible 20 Review Sweepstakes Entry

  • And the Band Played On

  • Politics, People, and the AIDS Epidemic
  • By: Randy Shilts
  • Narrated by: Victor Bevine
  • Length: 31 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 506
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 442
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 442

By the time Rock Hudson's death in 1985 alerted all America to the danger of the AIDS epidemic, the disease had spread across the nation, killing thousands of people and emerging as the greatest health crisis of the 20th century. America faced a troubling question: What happened? How was this epidemic allowed to spread so far before it was taken seriously?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The subtitle says it all!

  • By Jan Mitchell Johnson on 03-19-13

Heartbreaking

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-13-17

This is one of the books you read, and somehow along the way you can feel it changing the way you think. I'm nearly twenty-six, and somehow despite decades of varied levels of public health education, I somehow managed to grow up never really knowing what AIDS "did". In school, with exceptionally limited sex ed, you learn that AIDS is the Bad One when it comes to std’s and you get lectures on abstinence and condoms. You don't hear about the massive number of health problems that come along with the disease, not about the cancers or the opportunistic infections or really any of the many many different ways that this disease began to yshow it face--no wonder it was initially so hard to isolate; it isn't a single set of symptoms, it's a pile of over-lapping and separate diseases that no one really expected to see. Unusual forms of skin cancer and unlikely infections... Honestly, I'm disappointed in myself for never making the cognitive leap and realizing that an immune disorder would manifest in so many different ways, but I am also disappointed that even after so many people have died there is still not enough general public education that the full effects of AIDS that I could grow up in the 90s and manage to be ignorant of anything beyond the most basic level.

There should be better and more accessible public education efforts, it's infuriating to read about their absence during the unfolding of the epidemic shown in this book, but it's heartbreaking to realize that even as time continued to pass somehow universal public education on the subject is still lacking. Maybe I'm in a skipped over gray area; maybe the rest of the country is doing better when they teach their children. Hopefully the rest of the country is doing better. Anecdotal experience is not evidence, but it's not like I grew up under a rock. One of the central recurring problems explored in this book is the unwillingness of the media to talk about the disease and the disinterest of the public in hearing about it. I do not think that is a problem that has entirely gone away.

This book is absolutely a monster of masterful reporting. It covers so many years of highly detailed and nuanced perspectives from not just the people infected with the disease, but the medical professionals, politicians (at federal, state, local community levels), community leaders, reporters, business owners (from blood banks to bath houses). One of the frustrating and flat out horrifying things about this account is that so many people, from so many walks of life, were involved in the spread and treatment of the epidemic. So many people involved and yet they were always talking and arguing at cross purposes even if the were on the same side. Doctors who warned patients to limit unsafe sex practices come across as policing morality rather than health. The problem is that some doctors really only meant to help and some did intend for the religious/moral overtones to shine through their advice. People who genuinely wanted to help were not necessarily 100% altruistic or open minded; it's hardly palatable advice to be told not to do something when you know or think you know that the person advising you is “morally” opposed to your behavior. Yet it's frustrating, because the advice wasn't wrong. Unsafe sex practices absolutely needed to be curtailed. It sucks that the history of telling gay people what to do with their love lives has always been a loaded issue. If the baggage that came with the territory had been absent, maybe the story could have had a more productive conversation. It's hard to receive help from people who hate you. And it sucks when the rhetoric of the people who hate you falls into overlap with the people who are trying to help.

The blood banks are god damned evil incarnate in this narrative. Holy shit. Despite evidence that AIDS could be transmissible through blood, they stubbornly refused to acknowledge the danger. They refused to test the blood they were passing around, and even became angry when one blood bank did finally start testing. All because of the expense of testing. Seriously. Lives were being critically endangered at ridiculously alarming rates and the banks stuck to their party line of the “ One in 1 million chance” od contracting AIDS through transfusions, completely refusing to accept culpability until way past the point of no return.

-Audible 20 Review Sweepstakes Entry

  • Something Like Autumn

  • Something Like..., Book 3
  • By: Jay Bell
  • Narrated by: Kevin R. Free
  • Length: 15 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 448
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 421
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 422

For some, love seems an impossible dream. Growing up gay in small-town Missouri, Jace Holden thought his chance would never come. When he meets Victor - a wild soul and fellow outsider - his chances of finding love go from bleak to a very uncertain, maybe. Bracing his heart, Jace chases after his desire, hoping for a warm hand to hold his tight.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Exceptional...

  • By Donald on 09-04-15

I reluctantly began this story.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-25-15

I really enjoyed the first two books in this series, but Jace was easily my favorite character. That made me a bit uneasy about starting this story, as I knew how it would end and I wasn't sure I wanted to watch the emotional turmoil unfold. In the end, I was glad I gave in.

I didn't expect the format of this book. Nearly the first two thirds of the book really belong to Jace and Victor. Their love story is unusual, frustrating, and tragic. As a teenager, I knew a guy quite a bit like victor, and I could sympathize with the allure someone like that might hold for Jace even though, for Jace's sake I wish he hadn't fallen in love with Victor. Victor would never have been able to fill the role Jace needed from a partner.

As the book progressed, I became increasingly anxious. There just wasn't enough time left. I was watching the remaining hours of the book dwindling away and Jace was running out of time to enjoy his mostly happy ending. Ben and Jace's story was running out of time and it wasn't enough. That's part of the point, I guess. Jace didn't get to live the long life he deserved, but he got more than he expected.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Wonderful Story of Henry Sugar

  • By: Roald Dahl
  • Narrated by: Andrew Scott
  • Length: 7 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 138
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 128
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 128

Meet the boy who can talk to animals and the man who can see with his eyes closed. And find out about the treasure buried deep underground. A clever mix of fact and fiction, this collection also includes how master storyteller Roald Dahl became a writer. With Roald Dahl, you can never be sure where reality ends and fantasy begins.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Really fantastic!

  • By Marissa on 10-25-13

Really fantastic!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-25-13

Where does The Wonderful Story of Henry Sugar rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

This has actually been one of my favorite audio books out of the fifty or so that I have listened to.

What other book might you compare The Wonderful Story of Henry Sugar to and why?

These short stories tend to include a bit of magic and wonder and animals. I actually felt compared to compare them to "A Very Old Man With Enormous Wings," by Gabriel Garcia Marquez--part fairytale, part realistic. (I liked this better though)

Have you listened to any of Andrew Scott’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

I have not heard any of his audiobooks before, but I have seen several of his television roles. I know how much attention he has gotten for his role as Moriarty on BBC 's Sherlock, and I must admit that it was his name that attracted me to this particular recording. Despite the lack of reviews, I decided to give this a shot and I was not disappointed.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

The entire story of "The Swan" was beautiful. It made me feel sick and anxious and terrified by the cruelty of those boys, but I was on the edge of my seat listening in horrified fascination to hear how it would all play out. I sat in my driveway for ten minutes after I got home, just to finish it.

Any additional comments?

I was really blown away by this performance. It was engaging and well paced, the narration and the stories themselves combined to create a really great experience.

The only thing I can think of that could have been improved would probably be the Jamaican accents from the first story, which were a little bit jarring. However, I absolutely commend the way he voiced female characters, subtly and non-ridiculous (which seems to be way difficult for a lot of male narrators, I've noticed).

10 of 10 people found this review helpful

  • John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme: The Complete Series 2

  • By: John Finnemore
  • Narrated by: John Finnemore
  • Length: 2 hrs and 46 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 284
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 254
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 247

The complete second series of BBC Radio 4's award-winning sketch show - winner of the Chortle Radio Award of the Year. In these six episodes, which make up the complete second series, you'll hear some moth-based lunacy, an awkward celestial relationship, a heart-warming tale of the days before health and safety, and how The Archers sounds to people who don't listen to The Archers - plus many other sketches featuring acute observations and wonderful wordplay.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Insomnia song.

  • By Marissa on 09-07-13

Insomnia song.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-07-13

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

Yes, and I have. I basically give it a blanket recommendation to everyone I know.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Roger Watiss, founding member of the silent majority.

(Or the man with insomnia)

(Or the chess royalty)

(It is hard to choose, really)

What about John Finnemore’s performance did you like?

He is a genius. His voices--"normal, silly French, and TWO kinds of posh!"--are always engaging and well paced.The whole cast is really really good, they work together extremely well. Every scene showcases the well-tuned, well-played voice acting done by every member of the cast.

Any additional comments?

If you like quick witted comedy, with a special focus on the ridiculous nature of rhetorical flourishes, then this is the show for you. The ghost-stories-that-aren't-ghost-stories at the end of each episode may be some of the most well-crafted parodies I have ever encountered. It walks the line between the ridiculous and the absurdly clever, without losing balance or falling too far off track. The sketches are consistent AND consistently funny.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme: The Complete Series 1

  • By: John Finnemore
  • Narrated by: John Finnemore
  • Length: 1 hr and 51 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 342
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 307
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 302

John Finnemore, writer and star of Cabin Pressure, returns in four episodes of his own sketches, as heard on BBC Radio. These episodes feature a tiger with a gun, reveal the truth behind the war effort, visit some documentary-makers, has a big debate and then treats itself to a little trophy. Plus, there are also some musical interludes from the zoo. John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme is written by and stars John Finnemore (The Now Show, Miranda, That Mitchell and Webb Look).

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • So very special in every special way...

  • By Marissa on 09-02-13

So very special in every special way...

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-02-13

If you could sum up John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme: The Complete Series 1 in three words, what would they be?

Marmite-flavored toothpaste

What did you like best about this story?

It is basically a consistently funny sketch show. If ever there were an elusive creation, that would be it: consistently funny sketch comedy. Almost every skit is right on target, hilarious, well-acted, and well-paced.

What does John Finnemore bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

His voice has the ability to make me instantly want to smile. It is reflexive at this point. The sound of his voice is irreversibly linked in my mind to happiness and laughter.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

YES! However, I love to simply relisten to favorite pieces as well--I can't refrain from sharing them with just about anybody I can get to listen (anyone who has needed a car ride from me in the last eight months is now very familiar with John Finnemore's comedy shows, both souvenir programme and cabin pressure)

Any additional comments?

Listen to it! It will be one of the best choices you could possibly make for your time.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Cabin Pressure: The Complete Series 4

  • By: John Finnemore
  • Narrated by: AudioGO Ltd
  • Length: 2 hrs and 48 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,381
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1,278
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,272

Stephanie Cole, Benedict Cumberbatch & Roger Allam star in the fourth series of the hit sitcom about the tiny charter airline for whom no job is too small, but many, many jobs are too difficult. By John Finnemore (The News Quiz, Mitchell & Webb).

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Laugh out loud

  • By Mary on 06-04-13

Brilliant!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-02-13

What was one of the most memorable moments of Cabin Pressure: The Complete Series 4?

I pretty much adored Arthur's use of the intercom at the Kilkenny airport--by the time he concluded with "love, the airport" I was practically choking on laughter. However, the cliffhanger at the end of the Yverdon episode is probably the most painful/exciting/happy/sad moments in the entire run of the show.

Have you listened to any of AudioGO Ltd’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

I have listened to all four series of Cabin Pressure, and this may be might favorite so far. John Finnemore's performance as Arthur has caused me to develop a crazy love for the hapless steward. Benedict Cumberbatch is fantastic as Martin, the awkward and luckless Supreme Commander. Douglas, who is just as self-indulgent and clever as always actually seems to have learned to relate to others a little better this series--and Roger Allan delivers each line with just the perfect amount of condescension suavity .

Any additional comments?

Cabin Pressure has introduced me to the wonderful talent of John Finnemore, who is just a brilliant comedian. His other radio show, John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme, has a lot of the same flair for the ridiculous, so if you are looking for something similar to Cabin Pressure... (I couldn't get enough, so I pretty much HAD to go find something to help me get my fill)

3 of 4 people found this review helpful