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Mark T. Branden

  • 3
  • reviews
  • 12
  • helpful votes
  • 4
  • ratings
  • A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

  • By: Mark Twain
  • Narrated by: Nick Offerman
  • Length: 13 hrs and 25 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,215
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,041
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,044

With his trademark mirth and boundless charisma, actor Nick Offerman brought the loveable shenanigans of Twain's adolescent hero to life in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Now, in yet another virtuosic performance, the actor proves that despite being separated by a span of over a century, his connection to the author and his work is undeniable and that theirs is a timeless collaboration that should not be missed.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Mark Twain and Nick Offerman are a perfect match

  • By Philip M. Chute on 10-23-17

Mark Twain + Nick Offerman = Auditory Mirth

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-26-17

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court is a literary treasure as it stands alone. When combined with Mr. Offerman's scotch-smooth rendition, its value only increases. It is as if Mark Twain used his protagonist's time traveling ability to pen a novel knowing the exact person for it to be read by 125 years later.

12 of 14 people found this review helpful

  • The Skeptic's Guide to American History

  • By: Mark A. Stoler, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Mark A. Stoler
  • Length: 12 hrs and 1 min
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,886
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,600
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,561

To take a skeptical approach to American history is not to dabble in imaginative conspiracy theories; rather, it's to reframe your understanding of this great nation's past and actually strengthen your appreciation for what makes American history such a fascinating chapter in the larger story of Western civilization. And in this bold 24-lecture series, you can do just that.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Skeptical but Not Cynical

  • By Ark1836 on 11-20-15

Great

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-13-15

Interesting and diverse topics covering entire history of United States. Engaging lecturer who explained underlying concepts impacting historical events and persons.

  • The History of Ancient Rome

  • By: Garrett G. Fagan, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Garrett G. Fagan
  • Length: 22 hrs and 42 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,954
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,769
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,752

Even today, the influence of Ancient Rome is indelible, with Europe and the world owing this extraordinary empire a huge cultural debt in almost every important category of human endeavor, including art, architecture, engineering, language, literature, law, and religion. At the peak of its power, Rome's span was vast. In the regional, restless, and shifting history of continental Europe, the Roman Empire stands as a towering monument to scale and stability, unified in politics and law, stretching from the sands of Syria to the moors of Scotland. And it stood for almost 700 years.In this series of 48 spirited lectures, you'll see how a small village of shepherds and farmers rose to tower over the civilized world of its day and left a permanent mark on history. In telling Rome's riveting story, Professor Fagan draws on a wealth of primary and secondary sources, including recent historical and archaeological scholarship, to introduce the fascinating tale of Rome's rise and decline, including the famous events and personalities that have become so familiar: . Horatius at the bridge . Hannibal crossing the Alps during Rome's life-or-death war with Carthage . Caesar assassinated before a statue of his archrival Pompey . The doomed lovers Antony and Cleopatra . The mad and venal emperors Nero and Caligula . The conversion of Constantine The course also addresses one of history's greatest questions: Why did the Roman Empire fall? And you'll learn why most modern scholars believe that the empire did not "fall" at all, but, rather, changed into something very different-the less urbanized, more rural, early medieval world.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Accessible

  • By Sean on 10-05-13

Great

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-06-15

Well spoken, entertaining, and very organized. The lecturer was easy to listen to and engaging.