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Anaxamaxan

Eugene, OR, United States
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  • All These Worlds

  • Bobiverse, Book 3
  • By: Dennis E. Taylor
  • Narrated by: Ray Porter
  • Length: 7 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 37,778
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 35,362
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 35,258

Being a sentient spaceship really should be more fun. But after spreading out through space for almost a century, Bob and his clones just can't stay out of trouble. They've created enough colonies so humanity shouldn't go extinct. But political squabbles have a bad habit of dying hard, and the Brazilian probes are still trying to take out the competition. And the Bobs have picked a fight with an older, more powerful species with a large appetite and a short temper.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Satisfying End to a Fun Series

  • By Craig Schorling on 08-20-17

Bobiverse started strong, ended meh

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-03-17

The first book mixed science-inspired speculation, social commentary and a personal narrative and the story managed to pull off a hat trick to end up unexpectedly complex and interesting. By the third book, we're forced to suspend disbelief endlessly, tolerate childish takes on sociology, and to top it off the writing is flat.

Gender roles in the story are pulled from the 1950s. Interaction with non-human species barely moves beyond the level of 1960's Star Trek TSOS. The social commentary has degenerated into the sort of stereotypical unempathetic complaints from nerd types about the stupidity of human society, while having very little experience of that society outside of their own suburban bubble. Even the speculation is mostly gone, replaced with refrains like the 'universality' of certain western societal traits among non-human societies.

This series could really have gone somewhere. The author hints at something like when describing how some later generation Bobs question their role as stewards of the "ephemerals". But given his lack of depth in just about every other area, it's not surprising that he fails to explore this, instead opting for a simplistic war narrative hinging on a basic grasp of the relatively slow speed of light.

Thankfully Ray Porter's performance remains on point. So at least there's that.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Agile Project Management & Scrum QuickStart Guides

  • By: ClydeBank Business
  • Narrated by: Dave Barron
  • Length: 1 hr and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 98
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 84
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 83

The ultimate companion for professionals interested or involved in Agile and Scrum, this book will give you a holistic, well-balanced introduction to both subjects while discussing their integration and synergy!

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • a dry performance of a three hour infomercial

  • By kingkongkongming on 06-16-16

The reader sounds almost human!

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-02-16

This is obviously an experiment in using voice synthesis for an audiobook instead of paying voice actors. As such, it's not bad at all. It reminds me of the computer voices in many sci-fi movies and shows in the past. The second computerized voice, the British one, occasionally flubs on word emphasis but is generally more interesting than the first one, which reminds me of a talking digital skull.

The books themselves are a little like reading technical specifications documentation, at least in terms of style, diction and story, but the information given is useful, and the format is conducive to the use of voice synthesis in place of actual human readers.

Caveat audiens.

Start with Why audiobook cover art
  • Start with Why

  • How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action
  • By: Simon Sinek
  • Narrated by: Simon Sinek
  • Length: 7 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15,811
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13,616
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13,535

Why are some people and organizations more innovative, more influential, and more profitable than others? Why do some command greater loyalty from customers and employees alike? Even among the successful, why are so few able to repeat their successes over and over? People like Martin Luther King Jr., Steve Jobs, and the Wright Brothers might have little in common, but they all started with why.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Inspire to find why you do what you do

  • By A. Yoshida on 09-19-13

Yep, a touch repetitive, but very worthwhile

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-29-11

Overall, this is a very good book. In audio form, it's occasionally obnoxious with its repetition. I'm guessing that in written form, there were pull quotes scattered throughout the text. The author just reads those, as if they were part of the text. A bit weird.

On the other hand, the material is great. On the face of it, "start with why" is practically self-evident. Yet, as Sinek illustrates, many companies (and individuals!) forget their "why" and focus too much on the whats and hows of business.

If you're not following this material closely, it might sound like just another business book making hay out of the obvious. Don't get stuck too much on his frequent use of Apple as an example -- it's just one that's easily accessible. However, I do think this would make a more compelling book if Sinek had chosen a better example for the corporate part, told their story, and then kept coming back to *that*. The MLK example was pretty good though.

Other reviewers didn't like Sinek's reading. Aside from reading pullquotes, I think he did quite well. The sound quality isn't superb, but it was perfectly acceptable.

This book has definitely influenced me personally and professionally. I am rethinking what the heck my business (and life!) is about.

  • I, Claudius

  • By: Robert Graves
  • Narrated by: Nelson Runger
  • Length: 16 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,635
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,790
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,795

Here is one of the best historical novels ever written. Lame, stammering Claudius, once a major embarrassment to the imperial family and now emperor of Rome, writes an eyewitness account of the reign of the first four Caesars: the noble Augustus and his cunning wife, Livia; the reptilian Tiberius; the monstrous Caligula; and finally old Claudius himself. Filled with poisonings, betrayal, and shocking excesses, I Claudius is history that rivals the most exciting contemporary fiction.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Unsurpassed, addictive brilliance

  • By Chris on 06-09-09

A great book, excellent reading

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-21-10

I normally listen to audiobooks when doing housework, driving or something similarly menial. But then the dishes would be done, and I'd find myself sitting still, listening to Nelson Runger's reading. Wonderful! The story itself is fiction, but with a fair amount of historicity providing a tremendous reminder of the fascinating and revolting history of the Roman empire. As a bonus, Graves has Claudius end on a sardonic joke. Highly recommended.

  • Good to Great

  • Why Some Companies Make the Leap...And Others Don't
  • By: Jim Collins
  • Narrated by: Jim Collins
  • Length: 10 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,858
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,122
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,064

Built To Last, the defining management study of the 90s, showed how great companies triumph over time and how long-term sustained performance can be engineered into the DNA of an enterprise from the very beginning. But what about companies that are not born with great DNA? How can good companies, mediocre companies, even bad companies achieve enduring greatness?

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Good info, over-the-top narration

  • By Anaxamaxan on 08-31-10

Good info, over-the-top narration

Overall
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-31-10

Yes, the narrator is the author, so maybe that counts for something. But man, he just goes so far over the top over-weighting his words so often, it's pretty comical at times. The sample is a bit misleading, because Collins is just getting warmed up in that. A few more pages in, and He Is Speaking Like A Triumphant Graduate Student Who Has Just...Found...The...PROOF...That...Discipline -- DISCIPLINE! -- is the Key!

Narrative comedy aside, there is a lot of worthwhile information here, though when you boil it down there's a lot of the obvious here. Also in late 2010 the discussion of Circuit City and Fannie Mae as "great companies" is a bit ridiculous; and some of the companies discussed as great have attained their greatness in part by less-than-moral means that have come to light in the years of increasingly ubiquitous internet since the book's publication. Still, Collins' articulation is highly accessible and well-ordered, making "the obvious" easier to digest and retain. 4 stars for content, 2 stars for narration = 3 stars.

61 of 72 people found this review helpful

Getting Things Done audiobook cover art
  • Getting Things Done

  • The Art of Stress-Free Productivity
  • By: David Allen
  • Narrated by: David Allen
  • Length: 7 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 4,444
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 2,814
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,777

From core principles to proven tricks, Getting Things Done has the potential to transform the way you work - and the way you experience work. At any level of implementation, David Allen's entertaining and thought-provoking advice shows you how to pick up the pace without wearing yourself down.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Productive Right Away

  • By Lisa on 02-10-08

Finally, GTD in unabridged audio format!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-04-08

I had listened to the earlier, abridged version previously, and this unabridged version is far superior. In fact, I would say it's superior to the printed book too, because a lot of this book is "coaching", where you're expected to be doing something in conjunction with the book. The unabridged version goes into way more depth than the abridged one.

Plus, Allen is again his own narrator, which adds to the feeling of having a coach guiding one into these new practices.

Those who claim this is outdated in the 21st century are missing the point. As Allen repeatedly points out in the book, it's not the medium that's important but the principles behind the method. Once you understand the principles, you can apply them in any medium you like. The good news is (as Allen would say), the principles are not at all difficult to understand. And believe it or not, most of the working world is still paper-based and/or document-centric. So, paper-based examples are the most accessible to the greatest number of listeners. I'm using the GTD method, and about 95% of my working world is digital (I'm a web developer).

63 of 65 people found this review helpful

  • The Smartest Investment Book You'll Ever Read

  • By: Dan Solin
  • Narrated by: Craig Wollman
  • Length: 2 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 65
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 49
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 44

If your main concern is getting the most out of your money without sacrificing financial security, Dan Solin tells you how to take control of your finances and end up in the top five percent of all professionally managed money.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Nothing new. Bitterly boring

  • By March on 06-27-11

Good, slightly infomercially

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-17-08

I'm a newcomer to investing and especially to investment books. But the little stock market investing I've done has been lackluster, and Solin's book offers some compelling evidence why. I'd recommend getting a print or ebook copy, as there are some numbers and symbols that would be easier to take in visually.

Still, overall the book is quite interesting, informative and an easy listen. I'd definitely recommend it, except that it'll take me some time to put this information to the test!

The reader is just a little over emphatic at times, but generally decent. There are some puzzling repeat references to Vanguard, which make me wonder if Solin is really just selling Vanguard with this book. However he adds in other examples too in the "nuts and bolts" of part 4.

Also -- the audiobook gives an incorrect URL for the Asset Allocation Questionnaire on the author's website. The correct URL for the site is http://www.smartestinvestmentbook.com.

4 of 6 people found this review helpful