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C Turner

Taos, NM
  • 15
  • reviews
  • 90
  • helpful votes
  • 65
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  • A Man on the Moon: The Voyages of the Apollo Astronauts

  • By: Andrew Chaikin
  • Narrated by: Bronson Pinchot
  • Length: 23 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,717
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,533
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,521

Audie Award, History/Biography, 2016. On the night of July 20, 1969, our world changed forever when Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin walked on the moon. Based on in-depth interviews with 23 of the 24 moon voyagers, as well as those who struggled to get the program moving, A Man on the Moon conveys every aspect of the Apollo missions with breathtaking immediacy and stunning detail.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Long, comforting book on moon exploration

  • By Mark on 06-17-16

Beautiful crafted, fascinating story of the Apollo program.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-21-18

Chaikin spent 8 years preparing and writing this book and it’s evident in the compelling thoroughness and heart with which he fills every page. He gives every single astronaut of the Apollo program, as well as members from flight control and he scientific community a part in telling this extraordinary tale. I’m just mystified how the public and government have become so apathetic towards exploration once the basic task of “conquering” the moon took place. I hope in my lifetime I get to see the trip to Mars or equal space exploration that mirrors the passion that existed in the 60s, almost as Chaikin says like a decade spliced from the 21st century.

  • Educated

  • A Memoir
  • By: Tara Westover
  • Narrated by: Julia Whelan
  • Length: 12 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 29,415
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 26,708
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 26,574

Tara Westover was 17 the first time she set foot in a classroom. Born to survivalists in the mountains of Idaho, she prepared for the end of the world by stockpiling home-canned peaches. In the summer she stewed herbs for her mother, a midwife and healer, and in the winter she salvaged in her father's junkyard. Her father forbade hospitals, so Tara never saw a doctor or nurse. Gashes and concussions, even burns from explosions, were all treated at home with herbalism. Then, lacking any formal education, Tara began to educate herself. Her quest for knowledge transformed her.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The Other Side of Idaho's Mountains

  • By Darwin8u on 03-28-18

Bold, honest, introspective tour de force

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-25-18

I just wrote a review and it disappeared but I loved this book so much I’ll go ahead and type up another with my thumbs on my little old phone... so I “read” the first 90% of this book in a day and then, busy from life, had to put it down for two days. The whole time I couldn’t get it out of my mind. Tara Westover is refreshingly honest, bold and introspective in her memoir about growing up in a conservative, Mormon family. This is about her childhood in this survivalist family of rural Idaho- a family that entirely shunned the public school system and “Illuminati” government to the point of dismissing birth certificates all together. This is also about learning to think for yourself in an environment that glorifies conformity and tradition over independent, rational thought. Westover used her curiosity and stubbornness to take one step after the other, from singing to taking the ACTs, to attending a university and eventually receiving a doctorate, and learn that what she understood to be reality was not in fact what her parents had always forced her to believe. This is a story about understanding rational thought in the face of abuse- physical, mental and emotional- which can be almost impossible when you’re experiencing it, especially from someone you love.

Honestly, every page of this book is steeped in meaning, and that is an enormous relief after having read an 800-page academic book that could have been edited down to 200 pages and had an ounce of the insight I found in this memoir. What it has, and what so many books today seem to lack, is an entirely original mind, with clear, independent thinking and I suppose that came specifically from creating her mind out of the enchanting, powerful, and yet ignorant fabric of a fear-fueled society. I’ll be thinking about- and talking about- this book for many years to come.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Running with the Kenyans

  • Passion, Adventure, and the Secrets of the Fastest People on Earth
  • By: Adharanand Finn
  • Narrated by: John Lee
  • Length: 8 hrs and 7 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 361
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 319
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 320

Whether running is your recreation, your religion, or just a spectator sport, Adharanand Finn’s incredible journey to the elite training camps of Kenya will captivate and inspire you. Part travelogue, part memoir, this mesmerizing quest to uncover the secrets of the world’s greatest runners - and put them to the test - combines practical advice, a fresh look at barefoot running, and hard-won spiritual insights.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • His Curiosity is Contagious

  • By Sharlene on 01-28-13

Not the worst but not the best running book...

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-26-18

I enjoyed this because it is about running and I’m on a running memoir kick. However, the author tries to write a book about a topic- runners in Kenya and why they’re the fastest- without any research, and experiential knowledge, and any real running savvy. I think he’s a pampered British journalist/dilettante who takes himself and his running and his knowledge of running far far too seriously. I’d like to know what his wife and daughters did the whole time they were in Kenya. I’d like to know what OTHER people were thinking but he seems to keep them at arms length, unwittingly, with his aristocratic, yet slightly hippie vibes. It seems a little money and a lot of entitlement allowed him to immerse himself- as a peripheral runner- into the world of Kenya’s elite runners. I think he should really figure out Kenya, running shoes, barefoot running and, well, running before he attempts another scattered diary, I mean book. But whatever, running memoirs are awesome and I’m thankful for each and every one of them.

  • Girl, Wash Your Face

  • Stop Believing the Lies About Who You Are So You Can Become Who You Were Meant to Be
  • By: Rachel Hollis
  • Narrated by: Rachel Hollis
  • Length: 7 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 32,631
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 28,847
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 28,684

As the founder of the lifestyle website TheChicSite.com and CEO of her own media company, Rachel Hollis developed an immense online community by sharing tips for better living while fearlessly revealing the messiness of her own life. Now, in this challenging and inspiring new book, Rachel exposes the 20 lies and misconceptions that too often hold us back from living joyfully and productively.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • More for women who are mothers

  • By MeredithNCSU girl on 04-07-18

Refreshing

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-24-18

I love how honest and open Hollis is, even when she’s talking about intimate or embarrassing subjects. She doesn’t throw her religion or views in your face. Rather she is like a good friend on a wine date discussing body image, marriage, babies, self esteem, work, faith. She is a good girl with careful wording, which I think my mom would love, but she’s also badass. I’d recommend this for any woman- she literally addresses the audience as “ladies”, “girl”, “mama” and I suppose any man who wants to empathize with women better.

  • Mao's Last Dancer

  • By: Li Cunxin
  • Narrated by: Paul English
  • Length: 15 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,318
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,032
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,029

This is the true story of how one moment in time, by the thinnest thread of a chance, changed the course of a small boy's life in ways that are beyond description. One day he would dance with some of the greatest ballet companies of the world. One day he would be a friend to a president and first lady, movie stars, and the most influential people in America. One day he would become a star: Mao's last dancer, and the darling of the West.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Has the "ring" of truth

  • By Deborah on 04-04-08

Pleasant surprise

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-22-18

I didn’t know anything about this when I first downloaded it on audible. I had searched for more “dance” books as I have been on a weird blend of astronaut/medical history/running/ballet kick. So lots of memoirs and some historical fiction. I thought this was fiction at first except quite full and methodical. The narration is a little dry and though I liked the proper English accent I doubted it fit the Chinese man it portrayed.
As I continued however the story gained depth and many clever hints at just how brainwashing and difficult China was under Mao’s communist regime. I looked up there background of the author and realized it was autobiographical and that these bizarre, serendipitous tales were all true. Then the story came to life and while I felt it was still sterile and methodical in parts (could have been partly the monotone quality of the narration) it gained flavor and layers of interpersonal awareness and philosophical undertones.
When our author moves to America, rallies to marry, is held up in the Chinese embassy, and later returns home to reunite with his family and introduce his wife, all of the odd somewhat choppy beginnings come together and everything paints a perfectly clear, emotionally charged picture of this incredible ballet dancer and his fortuitous journey West. I’d recommend this for anyone interested in ballet but as this is secondary to the story, I’d also recommend this to people interested in Chinese history, especially communism and Mao, in the bridge of East and West at that time, the sociological and psychological evolution of a person experiencing extravagance and capitalism for the first time. I’d recommend this to anyone interested in the development of humanity, family, wisdom and love.

  • An Anthropologist on Mars

  • Seven Paradoxical Tales
  • By: Oliver Sacks
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Davis, Oliver Sacks
  • Length: 11 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 929
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 826
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 825

To these seven narratives of neurological disorder Dr. Sacks brings the same humanity, poetic observation, and infectious sense of wonder that are apparent in his bestsellers Awakenings and The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat. These men, women, and one extraordinary child emerge as brilliantly adaptive personalities, whose conditions have not so much debilitated them as ushered them into another reality.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • SACKS IS AN ABSOLUTE JOY !!

  • By Jeff on 09-22-13

Anthropologist with a philosopher’s mind

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-30-18

This is the kind of book you wish you had read with others merely because it has revelations and insights everyone should have and you want everyone to have them with you.

Some parts feel like anthropological Notes, others medical, others like the intimate impressions in a poetic diary, and you’re not sure as a reader if you’ve just experienced a new revelation or something that you understood all along.

Oliver Sacks is one of a kind. I miss him greatly.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Edge of Eternity

  • The Century Trilogy, Book 3
  • By: Ken Follett
  • Narrated by: John Lee
  • Length: 36 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,119
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,167
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,147

Throughout these books, Follett has followed the fortunes of five intertwined families - American, German, Russian, English, and Welsh - as they make their way through the twentieth century. Now they come to one of the most tumultuous eras of all: the enormous social, political, and economic turmoil of the 1960s through the 1980s, from civil rights, assassinations, mass political movements and Vietnam to the Berlin Wall, the Cuban Missile Crisis, presidential impeachment, revolution - and rock and roll.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Some good, some bad

  • By Elisa on 09-22-14

Another epic tale

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-10-18

Another epic tale of everything from politics, war, rape, love, and friendship, by master storyteller Ken Follett. He builds a new reality from known historical moments, weaving seamlessly together fact and fiction to create this historical drama. It’s my sixth Follett book and it just makes me sad to see it end and have to move on to something else with new characters.

I just want to add here- because where else would I?- that strong, stubborn Maud really drove me crazy! She’s the whole reason half her family were stuck in East Berlin AND the Nazi regime of WW2. They could have left! Loved! Lived! Anyway, that’s all my griping.

Thanks again, Ken Follett.

  • Winter of the World

  • The Century Trilogy, Book 2
  • By: Ken Follett
  • Narrated by: John Lee
  • Length: 31 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,388
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,954
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,949

Winter of the World picks up right where the first book left off, as its five interrelated families - American, German, Russian, English, Welsh - enter a time of enormous social, political, and economic turmoil, beginning with the rise of the Third Reich, through the Spanish Civil War and the great dramas of World War II, up to the explosions of the American and Soviet atomic bombs. As always with Ken Follett, the historical background is brilliantly researched and rendered, the action fast-moving, the characters rich in nuance and emotion.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliant Sequel

  • By Tim on 03-15-13

King of Epic Trilogies

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-18-18

Five stars not because Follett is a terrific writer, because frankly I don’t think he is, not like a Ken Kesey or Haruki Murakami or Jane Austen. But he is a brilliant story-maker, entertainer, historian and researcher. He builds characters that I believe he must consider inside and out for years, and even after reading a book of titanic proportions I’m left wanting more. I truly care about some of the characters like you would a good friend or family member.

What I love about these trilogies is following some characters for decades as they grow old, have their own children, pass on... Pillars of the Earth was my first Follett book and remains my favorite, but I’m thoroughly enjoying this series and the in-depth, factual historical references. It takes a true visionary sensibility to craft something so thorough and epic.

Also the narrator Lee is truly talented. He has some very entertaining voices and is spot on with pitch, tone, and diction. So glad he’s narrated all of these books.

  • Fall of Giants

  • The Century Trilogy, Book 1
  • By: Ken Follett
  • Narrated by: John Lee
  • Length: 30 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15,976
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,959
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,927

Ken Follett's World Without End was a global phenomenon, a work of grand historical sweep beloved by millions of readers and acclaimed by critics. Fall of Giants is his magnificent new historical epic. The first novel in The Century Trilogy, it follows the fates of five interrelated families - American, German, Russian, English, and Welsh - as they move through the world-shaking dramas of the First World War, the Russian Revolution, and the struggle for women's suffrage.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Loved it and learned alot.

  • By Louis on 10-19-10

Feels like you are there, living through every scene

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-11-18

Once again Ken Follett has brought me into story that feels too vivid to be fiction. The characters develop and come to life and you can’t help but feel like you are there, living every new hardship or victory with them. Can’t wait to start book two.

  • The Good Girl

  • By: Mary Kubica
  • Narrated by: Lindy Nettleton, Johnny Heller, Tom Taylorson, and others
  • Length: 10 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 15,499
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 13,814
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 13,807

Born to a prominent Chicago judge and his stifled socialite wife, Mia Dennett moves against the grain as a young inner-city art teacher. One night, Mia enters a bar to meet her on-again, off-again boyfriend. But when he doesn't show, she unwisely leaves with an enigmatic stranger. With his smooth moves and modest wit, Colin Thatcher seems at first like a safe one-night stand. But following Colin home will turn out to be the worst mistake of Mia's life.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliant performances, moving story

  • By Roger on 09-11-14

A Good Book

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-21-18

This is somewhere between 3 and 4 stars for me. I enjoyed it but it felt strained in parts, like it was shuffled around and certain scenes were written multiple times and stuffed into the final product more than once. Regardless, I liked the visuals and the way I could feel relationships come together and intimacy form. I’d say plot is secondary here and it’s all about character development and the subtle details of kn between moments. I couldn’t help but feel emotionally connected to the protagonist and her experiences. What felt superficial at the start turned out to be an impactful glimpse into a kidnapping and the unsuspected twists along the way.