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S.C. James

Waco, TX United States
  • 31
  • reviews
  • 34
  • helpful votes
  • 314
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A bit outdated

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-24-19

I would have truly enjoyed this book when it first came out, but 9 years later it is a bit outdated. And many of the predictions have yet to materialize so it seems it was overly optimistic. Nevertheless, not a bad listen, I would just recommend finding something more current.

Exceeded expectations

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-24-19

In addition to the expected discussion of AI weapon systems, this book delved a lot deeper into things I had not even considered. For example, there were discussions of ethics, human reactions to AI systems, implications for society, humanity, and cultures, legal quagmires, doctrinal impacts, sociopolitical impacts and so on. Quite insightful and the author clearly has spent a lot of time thinking these issues through.

Really dated

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-20-19

As a scifi story, there is not much here. It got pretty boring as the main characters kept getting busy signals on their phone lines. Guess the author could not foresee that we would overcome that problem. Also, they used steamer trunks for luggage. Maybe you learn a little about the plague, but overall this is a slow story without much excitement. Skip it.

A little dry

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-16-19

Not particularly well written. It was a bit hard to stay focused on this book because there were never really any "grab your attention" moments. The soldier was incredibly lucky over and over, but the writing was not at all conducive to the listener being on the edge of his seat as the descriptions were fairly dry.

Not what I anticipated

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-22-19

If you are interested in endless descriptions of the sugar/salt/fat foods prepared at restaurants, then this is for you. I don't understand why it is merely a repetitive description of how bad processed and restaurant foods are for you. None of it surprised me. I was hoping to hear some suggestions or solutions to mitigate overeating....no such luck.

Great book, but digital copy is broken

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-12-19

I really tried to enjoy the book, but the Chapters were jumbled and out of order. The book starts with the first sentence saying, "Part IV, Chapter 19." But it gets worse because thereafter, the chapters do not align with the reading. So, when you advance a chapter, it starts mid-sentence. So, you can't even hunt around and try to recreate the proper chapter order.
Disappointing because each portion I listened to sounded really fascinating.

Not what I expected

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-26-18

This audio book was slower and less exciting than I was anticipating. Good overall job by the narrator. There were stretches of fairly uninteresting/pedestrian achievements in his life.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

You had one job

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-15-18

Let's say you are an audio book narrator. Your job is to ensure that you speak clearly AND accurately. What is it with these clowns that don't even bother to confirm their pronunciation? About the only German name not mispronounced was Hitler. It is like nails on a chalkboard to hear names as simple as Walter Model butchered every time (pronounced mah-del).

Interesting recent account

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-29-18

A worthwhile listen for someone interested in Pearl Harbor history. One aspect I found entirely lacking was not a hint of Toland's book "Infamy." Toland's works are masterpieces and, at the very least, this author should have acknowledged his contribution and probably should either have supported or refuted it. Wish I could ask the author about this glaring oversight of which he simply must be aware.

You will see why it is free

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-15-18

This audio book clearly illustrates the problem with someone with (apparently) minimal scientific literacy writing about a scientific topic. There is far too much artistic license taken with the descriptions herein. For example, when discussing how the main character was sent to Uzbekistan by the DOD, the scientists asks why he was selected to go there. The supposed answer he received was, "Hey, you are a doctor." The scientist responds, "Not that kind of doctor." To which the response was, "You will figure it out." This is a patently false and manufactured conversation. This is absolutely not how the DOD selects employees for overseas assignments. The author is doing himself a disservice by writing with a clear attempt to denigrate government scientists. From personal experience, I can assure you that government scientists are bright, caring people and they do not make spurious, arbitrary decisions. What's more, the government is entirely risk averse and they would not marginalize themselves by taking unnecessary risks. The author's fictionalized account of this story call into question the entire audio book. Don't waste your time on this story as it has little credibility.