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Doug D. Eigsti

Kansas City, MO United States
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  • Hell Divers

  • The Hell Divers Series, Book 1
  • By: Nicholas Sansbury Smith
  • Narrated by: R. C. Bray
  • Length: 10 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,524
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15,510
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 15,464

More than two centuries after World War III poisoned the planet, the final bastion of humanity lives on massive airships circling the globe in search of a habitable area to call home. Aging and outdated, most of the ships plummeted back to Earth long ago. The only thing keeping the two surviving lifeboats in the sky are Hell Divers - men and women who risk their lives by diving to the surface to scavenge for parts the ships desperately need.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I usually don't read my SciFi however....!!

  • By Michalena on 10-06-17

A Character-Based Zombie Story

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-13-19

I was hoping that Smith was branching out from his standard Zombie Story, but this is more of the same. I had my fill after five Extinction novels. I couldn't finish this one.

R.C. Bray is a great choice for any military-style story, and he is great here.

1 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Thin Air

  • A Novel
  • By: Richard K. Morgan
  • Narrated by: Colin Mace
  • Length: 18 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 554
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 516
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 513

From the author of the award-winning Altered Carbon, which is now an exciting new series from Netflix. On a Mars where ruthless corporate interests violently collide with a homegrown independence movement as Earth-based overlords battle for profits and power, Hakan Veil is an ex-professional enforcer equipped with military-grade body tech that's made him a human killing machine. But he's had enough, and all he wants is a ticket back home - which is just what he's offered by the Earth Oversight organization, in exchange for being the bodyguard for an EO investigator.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Turns out there is life on Mars

  • By Gilbert on 10-26-18

A Mars More Real than Earth Ever Was

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-13-19

Hard boiled crime fiction in the low atmospheric pressure of Mars. Somehow Morgan has managed to transplant the best parts of the crime novel into a post-cyberpunk setting. The place may be future Terra-formed Mars but it feels like the back streets of Prohibition-era Chicago.. Set in the same universe as Thirteen (The Black Man in the UK), this is also a prequel for the Takeshi Kovacs series. And while Altered Carbon may have more shock and awe, Thin Air has the ability to make you feel at home where you have never been, and never really want to visit, except in your imagination. It is a marvel.

I am going to go on record and predict that Morgan is writing a "Twist" trilogy; this being the second installment. Thirteen is the story of a genetically-altered hyper-male Thirteen trying to live in a world dominated by modern man. This Air is similar, with a Hibernoid utilizing his custom-bred toughness and intuition to navigate the not-so-soft underbelly of Martian organized crime. The natural follow-up should have the third type of genetically modified human, a Bonobo, as the protagonist. If he can pull it off, this will rival his Kovacs trilogy—Altered Carbon, Broken Angels and Woken Furies—for sheer cheer-inducing entertainment..

The narrator, Colin Mace, quickly becomes the voice in your head, not just the reader in your ears. He is great! Bringing each of the over-the-top underworld characters to vivid life. You don't need to wait for the movie; with Mace performing, this film-noir will be playing behind your retinas on demand. Top=notch narration. Unsurpassed!

0 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Passage

  • A Novel (Book One of The Passage Trilogy)
  • By: Justin Cronin
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick, Adenrele Ojo, Abby Craden
  • Length: 36 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17,320
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,947
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,927

First, the unthinkable: a security breach at a secret U.S. government facility unleashes the monstrous product of a chilling military experiment. Then, the unspeakable: a night of chaos and carnage gives way to sunrise on a nation, and ultimately a world, forever altered. All that remains for the stunned survivors is the long fight ahead and a future ruled by fear—of darkness, of death, of a fate far worse.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • A new type of vampire

  • By Randall on 06-29-18

Strong Opening then Tedium

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-12-19

First 10 hours: great.
Second 10 hours: not so much.

I bought this book in anticipation of the forthcoming TV show. Like the television preview commercials, the dynamic between the little girl and the FBI agent is everything I had hoped it would be. So if the show remains true to the book it will have a great start.

Sadly, this level of perfection does not hold. As the book develops, the story moves beyond the original characters I had come to love and focuses on a different group that I never formed any attachment with. I hung in there hoping that the story would come around again to explore more of the exploits of the girl and the agent; but no. It was clear that many years had passed and the story was going in a direction in which I had no interest whatsoever.

But look on the bright side: at least you get 10 solid hours of great story telling.Some books aren't even that long in there entirety. Also, the TV show will have enough material to fill an entire season. I will watch the show. But unless it takes an unforseen turn, I will not continues with this series.

7 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • Blood World

  • Undying Mercenaries, Book 8
  • By: B. V. Larson
  • Narrated by: Mark Boyett
  • Length: 12 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,268
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 3,973
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,958

A dirty deal was struck. Humanity was allowed to keep 300 rebellious worlds. In return, we declared war on a powerful enemy from beyond the frontier. A frantic build-up of forces has begun, but the task is hopeless. Seeking allies, Earth's legions are sent to Blood World. A planet on the fringe of known space, where the people only respect masters of combat. Earth's Legions must impress them, but other alien powers have been invited to join the contest. The prize consists of billions of loyal troops - Earth must win.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • “McGill’s World”

  • By Don Gilbert on 03-22-18

McGill is Our Secret Weapon

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-03-18

James McGill, Earth’s best weapon against the Galactics, is once again at the center of the action, so much so that is becomes suspicious to others that he must be the behind the scenes leader of all Earth’s forces in disguise as an ordinary low ranking officer. This is an ingenious scenario and the resolution is a lot of fun. If you have made it this far then you are probably only concerned with knowing if this book is like the previous seven. I can assure all fans of B.V. Larson’s Undying Mercenaries that this is more of the same. More of the same great characters. More of the same witty dialog and more of the same James McGill acting as a loose cannon to dangerous to be left alone but too resourceful to be put on the sidelines. This is good entertainment.

And with Mark Boyett doing the voices this is a movie playing in your head.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Rogue World

  • Undying Mercenaries, Book 7
  • By: B. V. Larson
  • Narrated by: Mark Boyett
  • Length: 12 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,868
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 4,574
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,555

The Galactics arrived with their Battle Fleet in 2052. Rather than being exterminated under a barrage of hell-burners, Earth joined a vast Empire that spanned the Milky Way. Today, Battle Fleet 921 is returning to Earth. It hasn't been seen by human eyes since our blissful day of Annexation. But what should be a joyful occasion, a chance to grovel at the feet of superior lifeforms, is rapidly becoming a nightmare.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I kept thinking about his Toes

  • By Don Gilbert on 07-08-17

McGill Foolishly Risks the World and Wins!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-03-18

This series keeps up the excitement. This is my favorite of all the Legion Varis books so far. The stakes are high but McGill rises to the occasion risking everything in his solo efforts to save all of humanity from being permed. If only his superiors could see what a valuable asset McGill was they he would not get into so much trouble. But then Undying Mercenaries would not be so much fun, would it?

I cannot say enough about Mark Boyett. It is amazing to hear his gravelly voice imitating a delicate female. It has given me pause on more than one occasion to suddenly realize that all these voices are are being done by one man.

  • The Ember War

  • Publisher's Pack, Books 1-2
  • By: Richard Fox
  • Narrated by: Luke Daniels
  • Length: 15 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,208
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,874
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,867

The Ember War, book 1: The Earth is doomed. Humanity has a chance. In the near future, an alien probe arrives on Earth with a pivotal mission: to determine if humanity has what it takes to survive the impending invasion by a merciless armada. The probe discovers Marc Ibarra, a young inventor who holds the key to a daring gambit that could save a fraction of Earth's population. Humanity's only chance lies with Ibarra's ability to keep a terrible secret and engineer the planet down the narrow path to survival.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I want to be ARMOUR

  • By bhagat on 04-30-17

Standard Military Sci-Fi

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-08-18

Several years ago I was exposed to Audible and began to realize that Zombies and Military novels had almost taken over the Science Fiction genre. I then began to sample some of these books. I was pleasantly surprised to find some excellent Military Science Fiction books. I am especially fond of Marko Kloos’ Frontline series and Undying Mercenaries by B.V. Larson. This Ember War two-book-set seems to be a typical offering of the sub-genre. For my taste it did not stand out from the crowd as the aforementioned books did.

Luke Daniels brings his top flight talent to this series. I loved him in the Frontlines series, and it is good to hear some of the same voices making appearances here.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Artemis

  • By: Andy Weir
  • Narrated by: Rosario Dawson
  • Length: 8 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 63,084
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 58,880
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 58,732

Jazz Bashara is a criminal. Well, sort of. Life on Artemis, the first and only city on the moon, is tough if you're not a rich tourist or an eccentric billionaire. So smuggling in the occasional harmless bit of contraband barely counts, right? Not when you've got debts to pay and your job as a porter barely covers the rent. Everything changes when Jazz sees the chance to commit the perfect crime, with a reward too lucrative to turn down.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • A ferrari with no motor

  • By will on 11-18-17

Unlikable Character / Implausible Story

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-08-18

I loved The Martian and was excited to listen his next book. The Martian was full of altruistic characters and noble efforts to survive in the most challenging of environments. Artemis is a portion of a petulant twenty-six year old child used to defying all authority with impunity. I struggle to express how much this novel grated on me. Now I like a good crime drama and can even appreciate some of the motivations of the crooks in some novels but this character, Jaz, was always a bit too smug about her career outside the law. She has a conscience but never listens to it. The crisis moment of the book is wholy contrived and brought on by the character’s bad decisions (She tries to destroy the oxygen generation equipment her moon city, for money, and almost kills the entire population). On the whole this is an unsatisfying story concerning characters I just could not bring myself to like.

Rosarion Dawson has a fine voice but delivers this book in a fashion I would call a “straight read.” To be fair she is always easy to understand. I would have enjoyed her performance more had she provided some more emotion to the life of the defiant criminal Jaz.

  • Paradox Bound

  • A Novel
  • By: Peter Clines
  • Narrated by: Ray Porter
  • Length: 12 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,487
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 11,832
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,817

Nothing ever changes in Sanders. The town's still got a video store, for God's sake. So why doesn't Eli Teague want to leave? Not that he'd ever admit it, but maybe he's been waiting - waiting for the traveler to come back. The one who's roared into his life twice before, pausing just long enough to drop tantalizing clues before disappearing in a cloud of gunfire and a squeal of tires. The one who's a walking anachronism, with her tricorne hat, flintlock rifle, and steampunked Model A Ford.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Traveling through history rather than time

  • By Michael G Kurilla on 11-04-17

Fun as Only Time Travel Can Be

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-08-18

I am always on the lookout for new time travel stories. It is rare that one manages to come up with a fresh take on the subject. In this book the characters travel through “history,” American history, exclusively. The reasons for this are bizarre but fully justifiable within the confines of the scenario established. This book has great characters, a solid plot, terrifying bad guys, and a satisfying ending. There is something very attractive about slipping into the past driving an American car. So, yes this is fantasy time travel (not having a temporal device). and, since it does not allow the past to be changed, this is “Nahin approved” according to the ideas put forth by science author Paul J. Nahin in his great book “Time Machines.”

Ray Porter is fantastic reading this book. He delivers a fine performance. I especially likes his voicings for “the Faceless Men.”

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Empire of Lies

  • By: Andrew Klavan
  • Narrated by: Andrew Klavan
  • Length: 11 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 168
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 126
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 124

Sustained by a deep religious faith, Jason Harrow has built a stable family and become a pillar of principle and patriotism in the Midwest. Then the phone rings, and his past is on the other end of the line. A woman with whom he once shared a life of violence and desire claims her daughter is missing - and Jason is the one man who can find her.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Outstanding Book/Audiobook

  • By Amazon Customer on 04-23-16

Hard-Boiled & Funny Political Thriller

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-08-18

Klavan is first and foremost a gag man. Not that this book doesn’t have a strong thrilling plot—it does. Not that the characters aren’t well rounded and undergo significant development as the story unfolds—they do. Not that this novel doesn’t have a strong moral message that threads in and out the whole thing—it most certainly does. No, Andrew Klavan is a fine storyteller who populates this well-plotted novel with realistic characters who struggle with their own depravity…but if there is a possible joke in there somewhere, he will find it. This is a funny book; funny in the way that hard-boiled noir crime novels are funny: If you know the formula you will find it amusing when you encounter it.

I first heard of Andrew Klavan by listening to his often hilarious political punditry. I decided to listen to Empire of Lies when facing the Klavanless weekend. I knew that he could make some sense of this broken politically correct world, and I was right.

Andrew Klavan the narrator is superb at emphasizing the sarcastic moments. He get all the author’s jokes. One of the characters, Patrick Peresal, is a great caricature of William Shatner and Klavan has his rhythmic manner of speech down pat. This made me laugh out loud several times; to the point that I had to explain what was so funny to my wife lest she think me crazy. My only criticism is that all the female voices come across as nasally and petulant, maybe that is how they were written but there is a limit to how much nasal intonation one finds pleasant; this is too much.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Points of Impact

  • Frontlines, Book 6
  • By: Marko Kloos
  • Narrated by: Luke Daniels
  • Length: 8 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,688
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 2,519
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,511

Earth's armed forces have stopped the Lanky advance and chased their ships out of the solar system, but for CDC officer Andrew Grayson, the war feels anything but won. On Mars, the grinding duty of flushing out the twenty-meter-tall alien invaders from their burrows underground is wearing down troops and equipment at an alarming rate. And for the remaining extrasolar colonies, the threat of a Lanky attack is ever present.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Meeting up with old friends that you actually miss

  • By Mgarneau on 01-10-18

Starting to Go Out with a Whimper

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-08-18

This may not be the end of the series but it seems to be coughing up blood. Gone are the interesting character interactions. Gone are the laugh-out-loud insults from Sgt. Fallon. In fact, the sense of humor is noticeably missing. It seems that as humanity’s situation grown more dire that the tone of the series has, correspondingly, become serious; serious as a heart attack. I think Kloos has lost his way. I think he may have forgotten just what made the series so great to begin with: character driven action and character driven humor. I hope this is not the last episode in the series. I would hate to think of it fading away. Kloos still has a chance to go out in a blaze of glory. He just need to return to the series’ roots.

That said, it does have a decent pot to drive the story. But my expectations are higher that the typical Military Sci-Fi fare. Frontlines has been much more entertaining. This fan frankly does not care if the story folds up into a nice neat package, I want to see the characters kicking butt and taking names all the while having a sardonic smirk on their faces.

Luke Daniels is great here nut he was not given the material to really stretch his legs with this one.