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Daniel Foster

  • 7
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  • 5
  • helpful votes
  • 30
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  • The Chapo Guide to Revolution

  • A Manifesto Against Logic, Facts, and Reason
  • By: Chapo Trap House
  • Narrated by: Felix Biederman, Virgil Texas, Brendan James, and others
  • Length: 7 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 522
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 477
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 471

In a manifesto that renders all previous attempts at political satire obsolete, The Chapo Guide to Revolution shows you that you don’t have to side with either the pear-shaped vampires of the right or the craven, lanyard-wearing wonks of contemporary liberalism. These self-described “assholes from the Internet” offer a fully ironic ideology for all who feel politically hopeless and prefer broadsides and tirades to reasoned debate.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • my beautiful boy virgil has a voice like an angel.

  • By D. Coleman on 08-22-18

Literally the best work of nonfiction America has ever produced

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-15-18

This book should be required reading in all public schools grades kindergarten, possibly preschool, and up.

  • Che Guevara

  • A Revolutionary Life
  • By: Jon Lee Anderson
  • Narrated by: Armando Durán
  • Length: 36 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 691
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 455
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 460

Che Guevara was a dashing rebel whose epic dream was to end poverty and injustice in Latin America and the developing world through armed revolution. Jon Lee Anderson traces Che's extraordinary life from his comfortable Argentine upbringing to the battlefields of the Cuban revolution, from the halls of power in Castro's government to his failed campaign in the Congo and his assassination in the Bolivian jungle.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Encompassing and Fair Look at an Historical Man

  • By Matt on 08-10-11

The best biography I’ve ever read. By far

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-11-18

In depth depiction of Che’s incredible life. Was in tears by the end of it

  • Kill All Normies

  • Online Culture Wars from 4Chan and Tumblr to Trump and the Alt-Right
  • By: Angela Nagle
  • Narrated by: Mary Sarah
  • Length: 4 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 230
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 204
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 201

Recent years have seen a revival of the heated culture wars of the 1990s, but this time its battleground is the Internet. On one side the alt-right ranges from the once obscure neo-reactionary and white separatist movements, to geeky subcultures like 4chan, to more mainstream manifestations such as the Trump-supporting gay libertarian Milo Yiannopolous. On the other side, struggle sessions and virtue signaling lurk behind a therapeutic language of trigger warnings and safe spaces. The feminist side of the online culture wars has its equally geeky subcultures.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Some false equivalences, but otherwise great analysis

  • By Daniel Foster on 04-23-18

Some false equivalences, but otherwise great analysis

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-23-18

It comes off as trying to say the sensitive tumblr crowd is somehow the left’s alt-right, but it’s hard to compare people who just get butthurt easy to those who lionize a mass shooter and are openly Nazi in a lot of cases. Also it seems like the author doesn’t think TERFs are a thing, but it only takes about 10 minutes on twitter to see that they are and they’re active. Lastly, anarchists aren’t progressives. They’re in their own category. Berkeley riots had nothing to do with progressivism. Progressives are too scared to actually meet anyone in the streets lol

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Kill Anything That Moves

  • The Real American War in Vietnam
  • By: Nick Turse
  • Narrated by: Don Lee
  • Length: 8 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 138
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 120
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 122

Americans have long been taught that events such as the notorious My Lai massacre were "isolated incidents" in the Vietnam War, carried out by a few "bad apples." However, as award-winning journalist and historian Nick Turse demonstrates in this pioneering investigation, violence against Vietnamese civilians was not at all exceptional. Rather, it was pervasive and systematic, the predictable consequence of official orders to "kill anything that moves."

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A book that shakes you to your core

  • By Gary Yevelev on 04-26-15

This should be required reading

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-31-18

This is a history of the war that is literally never talked about or taught anywhere. The Reagan white washing of the war has made our loss, let alone massacres and blatant war crimes fall by the wayside. Someone had to document them in an easy to grasp book like this one.

  • Democracy in Chains

  • The Deep History of the Radical Right's Stealth Plan for America
  • By: Nancy MacLean
  • Narrated by: Bernadette Dunne
  • Length: 10 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 700
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 629
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 625

Behind today's headlines of billionaires taking over our government is a secretive political establishment with long, deep, and troubling roots. The capitalist radical right has been working not simply to change who rules but to fundamentally alter the rules of democratic governance. But billionaires did not launch this movement; a white intellectual in the embattled Jim Crow South did.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A must read if you believe in democracy

  • By H. L. Nelson on 10-11-17

Should be required reading

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-28-17

The sooner Americans realize that what we're facing is a class struggle and not a racial one, the sooner that we'll be able to go about fixing this shit.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • October

  • The Story of the Russian Revolution
  • By: China Mieville
  • Narrated by: John Banks
  • Length: 11 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 403
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 366
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 366

The renowned fantasy and science fiction writer China Mieville has long been inspired by the ideals of the Russian Revolution, and here, on the centenary of the revolution, he provides his own distinctive take on its history. In February 1917, in the midst of bloody war, Russia was still an autocratic monarchy: nine months later it became the first socialist state in world history. How did this unimaginable transformation take place? How was a ravaged and backward country, swept up in a desperately unpopular war, rocked by not one but two revolutions?

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • The 20th Century's New Weird History

  • By Darwin8u on 08-12-17

An honest portrayal of the revolution and it's aftermath from a leftist's perspective

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-06-17

Nearly the entire book except for the last 30 minutes are focused soley on the events of 1917, but China did lay out the mayhem that Stalin created following Lenin's death

  • The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich

  • A History of Nazi Germany
  • By: William L. Shirer
  • Narrated by: Grover Gardner
  • Length: 57 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,115
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,710
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,694

Since its publication in 1960, William L. Shirer’s monumental study of Hitler’s German empire has been widely acclaimed as the definitive record of the 20th century’s blackest hours. The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich offers an unparalleled and thrillingly told examination of how Adolf Hitler nearly succeeded in conquering the world. With millions of copies in print around the globe, it has attained the status of a vital and enduring classic.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Held my interest for 57 hours and 13 minutes

  • By Jonnie on 11-08-10

One of the best history books I've read

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-23-17

Easily one of the best books on Nazi Germany that I have ever read/listened to. The only minor, and I mean minor, point that I think is worth mentioning is the author's attitude towards homosexuals. He consistently refers to it as a perversion towards the beginning of the book, going as far as even saying that one of Hitler's cronies being a homosexual helps explain why someone would be that way (embracing the brutality Nazism). Also, it was a little disturbing to see the author go out of his way to say that Hitler tolerated gays in his ranks in the early years, insinuating that Adolf Hitler was more tolerant than he was on the issue.

That all being said, I don't think it takes away from the book at all. It's a very minor issue that is only talked about in the brief period between the creation of national socialism and Hitler being named chancellor.