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Ed

Bownstown, MI, United States
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  • Zen Golf

  • Mastering the Mental Game
  • By: Dr. Joseph Parent
  • Narrated by: Dr. Joseph Parent
  • Length: 4 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 643
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 404
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 400

In chapters such as "During Your Swing Is Not the Time to Give Yourself a Lesson" and "How to Enjoy a Bad Round of Golf," the author guides golfers with simple yet powerful techniques to prepare for, execute, and, equally important, respond to the results of any golf shot. The author, Dr. Joseph Parent, is a PGA Tour Instructor who draws on his teaching experience to offer special methods that have led to amazing improvements in the games of professionals and amateurs alike.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • All golfers read this book

  • By Patrick on 05-16-04

Good Perspective on Golf

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-11-12

If you're and A-Type personality and are looking for some advice that can help make sense of the evils of golf, this books if for you. I say A-Type because "B" type personalities, and I hate them all, don't struggle with over thinking the game or creating undue stress on their own. They just play and have fun and, by and large, are just better golfers, and athletes in general, because of it. This book will help unravel that mystery.

This is not my first Zen type book. When I was into tournament archery I read one, which taught very similar techniques and broke the sport down in a very similar fashion. It really helped me become a better archer and overcome a lot of obstacles that kept me from reaching my potential and being competitive while enjoying the sport.

This book is well laid out and narrated. It has already helped me not only shave strokes off my game, but play with a more positive attitude and deal with the good days and bad days. I highly recommend this to anyone who wants to improve and enjoy the game of golf.

As a companion to what this book teaches I might also recommend some books on self-hypnosis. Using self-hypnosis can help ingrain some of the ideas and concepts brought out in this book, into your sub-conscious memory. In my experience this makes it easier to go with the flow and let things happen naturally, versus having to think how to think.

  • Under the Dome

  • A Novel
  • By: Stephen King
  • Narrated by: Raul Esparza
  • Length: 34 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18,273
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,560
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,596

On an entirely normal, beautiful fall day in Chester's Mill, Maine, the town is inexplicably and suddenly sealed off from the rest of the world by an invisible force field. Planes crash into it and fall from the sky in flaming wreckage, a gardener's hand is severed as "the dome" comes down on it, people running errands in the neighboring town are divided from their families, and cars explode on impact. No one can fathom what this barrier is, where it came from, and when - or if - it will go away.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Best Stephen King I've Heard

  • By Scott on 02-10-10

Mildly Entertaining at Best

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-09-12

Back in the day I was a big King fan. It's been a while since I read one of his books the last one being Cell which was pretty good. This one was just flat out boring and disappointing. The reviews I read and the overall premise gave me high hopes going in, but it fell flat for me. The narrator is mediocre at best, but I don't think a better one could have saved the book.

I struggled getting through this one near the end. You could tell it was going no where and was going to end badly and that it did. It was a huge almost laughable letdown.

Personally I just don't thing King has it anymore. I mean how can you not make a book about a huge dome covering a city interesting. Like I sad great premise - poor execution. I hope his latest book is better since I gambled and purchased it too and have it queued up.

If you're looking for some good old King brilliance like I was, this book will disappoint. If you are new to King it might be okay, but there are many better books by him. To me it was a wasted credit.



  • The Infection

  • By: Craig DiLouie
  • Narrated by: Peter Ganim
  • Length: 12 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 581
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 433
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 434

Five ordinary people must pay the price of survival at the end of the world. A mysterious virus suddenly strikes down millions. Three days later, its victims awake with a single purpose: spread the Infection. As the world lurches toward the apocalypse, some of the Infected continue to change, transforming into horrific monsters.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Worst Book Yet

  • By Michael on 06-07-12

Unmet Expectations

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-28-11

After reading some of the reviews I decided to take a chance on this book. I can’t say it was a complete disappointment, but it did not meet my expectations. Probably because the bar has been set pretty high after reading Day By Day Armageddon.

That said, I found the story interesting enough to keep me coming back, but I did not look forward to my ride home from work with as much anticipation as a good book brings. I found it hard to follow at times as the author took trips to the past in an attempt to bring some life to each of the main characters. I also found is a bit implausible at times with many of the characters developing Rambo like survivor skills without justification. Sure one could argue a zombie epidemic itself is implausible, but that is accepted going in. On that note I cannot really call this a zombie book since there were many other creatures that morphed from nowhere with little explanation.

My biggest complaint is around the narration. I don’t really fault the narrator, but the style the book was written in. Like Jimmy from Seinfeld. The narration switched to each characters own perspective but then there is a general narration perspective as well. Very unique, but more irritating than unique.

It’s a decent read, but not the best in the genre for sure. Although in many ways it violated traditional zombie protocols, so maybe I just expected a zombie book and this was not one?

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Affair

  • A Jack Reacher Novel
  • By: Lee Child
  • Narrated by: Dick Hill
  • Length: 16 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,658
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,882
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,876

Everything starts somewhere. For elite military cop Jack Reacher, that somewhere was Carter Crossing, Mississippi, way back in 1997. A young woman is dead, and solid evidence points to a soldier at a nearby military base. But that soldier has powerful friends in Washington. Reacher is ordered undercover - to find out everything he can, to control the local police, and then to vanish. Reacher is a good soldier. But when he gets to Carter Crossing, he finds layers no one saw coming, and the investigation spins out of control. Local sheriff Elizabeth Deveraux has a thirst for justice - and an appetite for secrets.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Better than previous Reacher adventures

  • By Susan on 09-30-11

Good Not Great

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-17-11

I've read all the Reacher books and have reviewed them all as well. I was critical of the last two books in the series and was hoping the next would bring something new and exciting and get the series back on track. This book did not fit the bill. It was better yes, but still not on a par with the earlier books.

While it was interesting to go back to see how it all started, it was not interesting enough. I really didn't learn all that much about Reacher that I did not know from reading all the other books or that added much value to the series. Good thought by Childs I suppose but not well executed.

Unlike other reviewers I think Dick Hill, who is one of the best in the business, seemed a little bored with this one. It's nice too that Reacher always gets the girl, but this one was a little hard to believe for me. I am not a prude by a long shot, but the love scenes were a bit over the top and unnecessary. Even Hill seemed a bit uncomfortable reading them. Well at least it made me a little uncomfortable listening to him read them. I guess if the story is weak it doesn't hurt to through in some out of place sex to spice things up. Come on Childs you are better than that.

The story itself was plausible enough. The detective work was a bit lame and it lacked action for my taste, but overall it was entertaining. I’ve just come to expect more. I don’t know what it will take, but Childs definitely needs to mix things up a bit or maybe it’s just time for Reacher to retire. I know it sounds painful, but I’d rather see it end than die a slow death. Let him go out with a bang Childs.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Fifth Witness

  • By: Michael Connelly
  • Narrated by: Peter Giles
  • Length: 13 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,952
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,652
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,634

Mickey Haller has fallen on tough times. He expands his business into foreclosure defense, only to see one of his clients accused of killing the banker she blames for trying to take away her home. Mickey puts his team into high gear to exonerate Lisa Trammel, even though the evidence and his own suspicions tell him his client is guilty. Soon after he learns that the victim had black market dealings of his own, Haller is assaulted, too - and he's certain he's on the right trail. Despite the danger and uncertainty, Haller mounts the best defense of his career in a trial where the last surprise comes after the verdict is in.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • You can't put this one down

  • By Dan on 05-10-11

Even Better than The Lincoln Lawyer

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-15-11

Having cut my teeth on Connelly’s Harry Bosch character I did not think I could get interested in a book about a lawyer, largely based on courtroom drama. I took a chance with Lincoln Lawyer, which was very good. The Fifth Witness is even better still. A lot of the book takes place in the courtroom and Connelly makes you feel like you’re actually in the room. The way Haller and his team investigate the case and follow the clues, brings it all together nicely. It makes the dialogue between the judge, lawyers and witnesses in the courtroom very interesting and believable. Haller’s personal life and development of the people he employs continues to evolve with just the right amount of attention not taking away from the focus of the case, which is the main story. This is a great book and one of my favorites by the author.
If you like the Harry Bosch series I think you’ll enjoy the Mickey Haller character. If you liked Lincoln Lawyer, I know you’ll like this book. I think this one would have made a better movie too.

  • Echo Park: Harry Bosch Series, Book 12

  • By: Michael Connelly
  • Narrated by: Len Cariou
  • Length: 11 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,225
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,905
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,891

In 1993, Marie Gesto disappeared after walking out of a supermarket. Harry Bosch worked the case but couldn't crack it, and the 22-year-old was never found. Now, more than a decade later, with the Gesto file still on his desk, Bosch gets a call from the district attorney. A man accused of two heinous murders is willing to come clean about several others, including the killing of Marie Gesto.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Another excellent Connelly novel.

  • By Joel on 11-05-06

Connelly at his best

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-08-11

If you have read Connelly and the Harry Bosch series, you'll not be disappointed by this book. If this is your first, well it shouldn't be for one thing, I recommend you go back and start at the beginning of the series. But this one stands on its own so new readers will enjoy this one as much as avid readers of the series. This was a good book with some twists and turns along the way. A less radical Bosch versus one more focused on getting the job done with some good detective work. There were moments of the “bad boy” coming out to play, but not so much that is took away from the story as in a few past books. One of those books I looked forward to on my commute. It even helped me get my garage cleaned out. Of course the narrator, Len Cariou, does an excellent job as usual. Worth the credit and must a listen for series fans.

  • Matterhorn

  • A Novel of the Vietnam War
  • By: Karl Marlantes
  • Narrated by: Bronson Pinchot
  • Length: 21 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,408
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,323
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,320

Why we think it’s a great listen: A performance so poignant, we gave Bronson Pinchot (yes, Balki from Perfect Strangers) our inaugural Narrator of the Year award.... In the monsoon season of 1968-69 at a fire support base called Matterhorn, located in the remote mountains of Vietnam, a young and ambitious Marine lieutenant wants to command a company to further his civilian political ambitions. But two people stand in his way.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Matterhorn

  • By Zachary on 04-20-10

Worth the credit...but the narrator...not so good

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-08-11

I don’t know that his book accurately describes what it was like in Vietnam during the war, but the author did paint a pretty graphic picture for the listener. It was a bit hard to follow at times and I was about a quarter of the way in before I really started to feel I was in touch with the main characters. Overall it was a good book and enjoyed the listen. That said, the narrator was definitely a rookie. I don’t know why other listeners commented that he did such a good job. I’ve listened to hundreds of audio books and he is about a 4 on a 1-10 scale. A better narrator would have made this a much more interesting book to listen too. If you can get by that, it's a good book.

  • True Evil

  • By: Greg Iles
  • Narrated by: Dick Hill
  • Length: 17 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,999
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,673
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,674

Dr. Chris Shepard is 36 years old, newly married, and well on his way to a perfect life. Or so he believes. But that future is forever cast into doubt the day Special Agent Alexandra Morse walks into his office and drops a bombshell: Dr. Shepard's beautiful new wife is plotting his murder.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Truely Captivating and Terrifiying!!!

  • By JenniferLOVESThrillers on 01-22-14

Not Quite as Good as Turning Angel

Overall
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-26-11

So I read this one and Turning Angel back to back. I gave Angel a 4 star rating (4.5 really) and would have given this one the same, right up to the end. The ending just lost if for me a bit. I wouldn't say it fizzled out, but it just appeared the author sort of ran out of steam and had some deadline to meet. One of the characters, albeit a supporting one until near the end, gets shot and killed without much of a to do at all. Bada boom bada bing. And this guy was a professional and the killer was not. It seemed to spiral in the same sort of direction after that. A lot of time was spent developing the characters, which was done well, and creating a plausible story, to end it sloppily. It’s like wrapping a diamond ring in a hefty bag. So I am left with a three star rating. It was a good story though and I did enjoy about 95% of it so I can still recommend it. I maybe could stretch it to 3.5

10 of 11 people found this review helpful

  • The Narrows: Harry Bosch Series, Book 10

  • By: Michael Connelly
  • Narrated by: Len Cariou
  • Length: 11 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,553
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,150
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,154

FBI agent Rachel Walling finally gets the call she's dreaded for years: the one that tells her the Poet has returned. Years ago she worked on the famous case, tracking down the serial killer who wove lines of poetry into his hideous crimes. Rachel has never forgotten Robert Backus, the killer who called himself the Poet, and apparently he has not forgotten her either.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • New to Harry Bosch

  • By Eileen on 08-31-04

Best Bosch Yet

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-21-10

I've read all of the Harry Bosch books in order and feel like I almost know him personally - thanks to the writing skills of Connelly. It's easy to take his books for granted, nothing supper flashy or over the top dramatic, just good solid story telling, excellent character development and just the right attention to detail.

This book is no exception - in fact I can say, without reservation, it's the best in the series so far. The story is told from a few perspectives which makes it even more unique and interesting. A very nice twist. It appears that Connelly is getting more comfortable with Bosch and truly enjoys "being" Harry Bosch. It comes out more clearly in this book than in any other. This ones a gem and I highly recommend it to new comers and series fans alike.

Len Cariou does a pretty good job narrating the last two in the series. I had my doubts when Dick Hill was seemingly replace by Ben (he sets a high bar for any narrator), but he does an admirable job.

Credits well spent.

  • Hostile Intent

  • By: Michael Walsh
  • Narrated by: Jay Snyder
  • Length: 11 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 125
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 59
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 59

Code named Devlin, he exists in the blackest shadows of the United States government--operating off the grid as the NSA's top agent. He's their most lethal weapon-and their most secret. But someone is trying to draw him out into the open by putting America's citizens in the crosshairs--and they will continue the slaughter until they get what they want.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 3-1/2 Stars - Could Have Been Better

  • By Ed on 08-26-10

3-1/2 Stars - Could Have Been Better

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-26-10

I purchased this book based on some other reviews I saw on Amazon and because the narrator is Jay Snyder who has done some nice work on other books I have purchased. Plus others have compared Walsh to Vince Flynn, which he is not, but I was drawn in and must say I did enjoy the story.


There was a lot going on in this book and the premise was believable enough, however, and this is my main criticism of this book, there was just not enough detail. I don’t say this often, but the book could and should have been about twice as long. I’m confident the author had the knowledge to add more detail based on the few times it was provided, but for some reason he chose to be a bit skimpy on details when they were needed. More than once I felt as if I had missed a chapter. It appeared that every now and then the story was in fast forward mode.


When it was moving at normal speed it was a very good story and managed to keep my attention and had me looking forward to my rides to and from work.


Overall a decent read and I’d probably purchase other books by Walsh, but Vince Flynn he is not. Then again, that’s a high bar for anyone in my book. I would recommend this book even though it felt more like an abridged version.

18 of 19 people found this review helpful