LISTENER

77Tango

  • 37
  • reviews
  • 34
  • helpful votes
  • 139
  • ratings
The Sisters audiobook cover art

Very Enjoyable! Please produce more!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-10-19

This is definitely worth a series!! Nice story, natural easy dialogue, enjoyable narrator, and definitely begging for more stories.

Living the French Revolution and the Age of Napoleon audiobook cover art

Phenomenal Lecturer and Historian

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-29-19

Suzanne Desan is one of the most engaging lecturers I've ever heard. As an absolutely brilliant subject matter expert on the world of the Revolution, she capably weaves the grand narratives of economic forces and class conflict with intimate looks at the prime movers and precipitating moments. In effect, she makes you feel that you've lived it yourself and know the people well.

A Grown-Up Guide to Dinosaurs audiobook cover art

Fantastic narrator and podcast!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-24-19

Fun and fascinating podcast that offers deeper intel on species far more unusual than typically portrayed by Hollywood and children's books, and other less commonly known facts about their life and times. Very enjoyable AND interesting.

The Celtic World audiobook cover art

Drop the sarcasm and teen-speak...

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-11-19

Dr. Paxton starts off strong, mapping her systematic approach to Celtic history. She presents a thorough historiographical basis for current scholarship. However while she promises to debunk simplistic arguments or outdated scholarship on Celtic culture, she too comes up with annoyingly simplistic explanations that reek of 21st century American culture. One example: after debunking the perception of a geographically unique Celtic art style, describing the wider findings of regional archaeology, she concludes that there was nothing culturally or genetically contiguous about Celtic/Insular art: "It was just popular".

I also want to complain about her lecturing style.
She uses sarcasm so persistently, I find myself strongly disliking her, as a person, while still trying to apprehend all of her valuable, otherwise well presented, information.

More Bedtime Stories for Cynics audiobook cover art

Pop-Nihilism for Millennials

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-16-19

You know that feeling you get after pissing away the entire beautiful weekend in a fetal position alone, curtains drawn, watching reruns of the Twilight Zone and Star Trek Original? During commercials you stare into the fridge looking for anything that goes with bologna and whipped cream, too lazy to go to the grocery store much less reach for the whipped cream and bologna, and too hideous to subject the pizza delivery guy to? You contemplate your existence on earth but then opt for the evening reruns of Star Trek Next Generation instead of suicide, or, just getting out, for instance?
If you don't know what that feels like, listen to this. You're welcome.
Or, you know, don't, and live your best life ever.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

Religions of the Axial Age: An Approach to the World's Religions audiobook cover art

Great lecture, but misleading intro

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-16-19

What captured my attention in selecting this lecture was the intro, which asserted it would be asking why, and how, the historical and socioeconomic conditions of the Axial Age gave rise to some of the world's greatest religions. In my opinion that line of inquiry was inadequately pursued. It was examined to some degree in the very beginning, but any mention of it later was more as historical narrative, rather than a point of inquiry. I had expected a far more multidisciplinary approach, incorporating archaeological, political, geographic and climatological data in order to thoroughly evaluate the question being raised.
All considered, this course is more of a survey of ancient far east and south east Asian religions and their beginnings. If thats what you are interested in, then this is the perfect course for you. The professor is fantastic - an engaging and relatable expert. If you, like me, want to understand the historical and socio-economic conditions of specific epochs that give rise to, and then sustained, such compelling systems of belief, this can only be an introduction.

No Land's Man audiobook cover art

Completely engaging! I adore him.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-16-19

What a joy to read, but even better to listen to Aasif tell it in his own words. He's a fantastic writer, a brilliant comedian and actor. I could listen to him tell stories for days. I was sad that it ended.

Aasif isn't just a beacon for Muslim-Americans (albeit a hilarious beacon), he's a beacon for people like me too: disaffected irreligious irreverent cocktails from all over the world, strangers in their own countries, and foreigners where they call home.

Feeding the Dragon audiobook cover art

I didn't want it to end...

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-13-19

Beautiful, charming, profound. I only wish there was more. Thanks Ms. Washington for sharing these rich memories.

A Mind of Her Own audiobook cover art

So many tropes, so little time

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-06-19

Marie Sklodowska was a 19th century Polish émigré in Paris. To McClain, she is Disney's Americanized 'Belle' from Beauty and the Beast. Her Polish bestfriend is a chubby female side kick - a trope of Eastern Europe deadpan sensibility. Pierre Curie is a sulky, proud Frenchman, endlessly intrigued by Marie's peerless interest in *his* work, and her proud resistance to his affections.

As far as character voices go, Marie's Polish cousin sounds distinctly Russian and her bestfriend slightly so - though occasionally French, if her dialogue follows a French "speaker". Marie's slightly older sister, with an accent of undetermined origin like Marie's father, speaks with the alto and sobriety of a world weary 50 year old. Marie herself may as well be from Ohio, girlish, and speaking with child like wonder at the marvels of science, instead of the disciplined, meager-living, woman of science, and loner, that she most likely was.

As far as historical development goes, McClain's historical context is explained in asides that seem to be coming from Marie's character, but with comments and labels that would only be written by a modern historian. The end of the story and commentary is also written in Marie's voice, but awkwardly, and in the third person, as if she was writing her own romantic glowing eulogy from beyond the grave.

Understanding Cultural and Human Geography audiobook cover art

Essential, Engaging & Data-rich - 1 big complaint

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-20-19

This is an absolutely essential listen for anyone interested in having an informed, historical and science-based understanding of how geography impacts human civilization. The professor is extremely cogent and engaging.

My only complaint is his early rushed and mischaracterizing critique of Jared Diamond's work. It does everyone a disservice - especially future readers.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful