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Wild Wise Woman

Atlanta, GA, United States
  • 99
  • reviews
  • 735
  • helpful votes
  • 131
  • ratings
  • The Perfect Ghost

  • By: Linda Barnes
  • Narrated by: Hillary Huber
  • Length: 9 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 20
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 15
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 15

Mousy and shy to the point of agoraphobic, Em Moore is the writing half of a celebrity biography team. Her charismatic partner, Teddy, does the interviewing and the public schmoozing. But Em’s dependence on Teddy runs deeper than just the job - Teddy is her bridge to the world and the main source of love in her life. So when Teddy dies in a car accident, Em is devastated, alone in a world that she doesn’t understand. The only way that she can honor his memory and cope with his loss is to finish the interviews for their current book....

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Narrator's phony Noo Yawk accents is grating

  • By Wild Wise Woman on 01-15-19

Narrator's phony Noo Yawk accents is grating

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-15-19

I found the delivery of the story impossible to follow in the droning cadence of the narrator. Honestly, I think maybe this book is simply not suited to audio. But the reader's fake "dis is how dey tawk dere" NYC accent was horrific, and I couldn't finish the book.

  • The Handyman

  • By: Bentley Little
  • Narrated by: Chris Andrew Ciulla
  • Length: 11 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,150
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,072
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 1,070

Daniel Martin has never forgotten his childhood encounters with Frank Watkins, the man who built his family a summer home out of cardboard and plywood. Frank's gaze was oddly confusing, as if he was attempting to discern the proper way to behave because he didn't know how to respond in a human manner. Since Frank obviously wasn't an alien, young Daniel thought maybe the man was crazy. In the end, Daniel would learn the terrifying truth about Frank Watkins. And as an adult, Daniel is about to discover there are more of them out there.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Little is back!

  • By JuniorLo on 02-08-18

A low point in Audible history

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-07-19

This book is gross, not scary; misogynistic, not engaging; features graphic and pointless descriptions of child rape and animal torture. I dragged myself through the entire thing, appalled, in grisly fascination, but demanded my credit back. I was interested enough that there might be a resolution to the mystery, but there isn't.

The narrator has a nasal Boston accent, while the main characters are from California and Texas, so that's word, as is the reader's weird, childlike delivery. And the author's innumerable references to bathrooms and their function are unparalleled in the history of written English.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Murder in an English Village

  • By: Jessica Ellicott
  • Narrated by: Barbara Rosenblat
  • Length: 9 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,119
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,955
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,943

The year is 1920: Flying in the face of convention, legendary American adventuress Beryl Helliwell never fails to surprise and shock. The last thing her adoring public would expect is that she craves some peace and quiet. The humdrum hamlet of Walmsley Parva in the English countryside seems just the ticket. And, honestly, until America comes to its senses and repeals Prohibition, Beryl has no intention of returning stateside and subjecting herself to bathtub gin.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Can't Wait For Next Book

  • By Sally W. Harris on 05-22-18

Very enjoyable!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-04-19

I love Ms Rosenblat, and this book is a solid throwback to the English drawing room mysteries of yore. The addition of a famous American adventuress gives it a familiar flavor, and I hope there will be more in the series.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Supernaturals

  • By: David L. Golemon
  • Narrated by: Stephen R. Thorne
  • Length: 16 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 724
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 673
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 670

Seven years ago Professor Gabriel Kennedy's investigation into paranormal activity at Summer Place ended in tragedy and destroyed his career. Now Kelly Delaphoy, the ambitious producer of a top-rated ghost-hunting television series, is determined to make Summer Place the centerpiece of an epic live broadcast on Halloween night. To ensure success she needs help from the one man who has come face-to-face with the evil that dwells in Summer Place, a man still haunted by the ghosts of his own failure.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Review for Anybody Who Owns the Previous Version

  • By Jessica's Bookshelf on 11-04-16

Intriguing, but ultimately disappointing

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-22-18

I wasn't familiar with this author, and snapped this up during a Halloween sale. Initially the story engaged me - a reality ghost hunting show set in the (mythical) house which supposedly inspired Shirley Jackson. A rag-tag group of "Supernaturals" is assembled and hijinks ensue. There are numbers tropes borrowed from Jackson, Stephen King, and finally, tragically, Thomas Harris's "Silence of the Lambs". The mystery concludes on a peculiarly transphobic note, which knocked it right out of the 4-star ballpark.

The writing is nothing to phone home about, either. Golemon needs a thesaurus - not *every* exclamation, intake of breath, cry, gasp or shout is a SCREAM, but the word is a constant presence in the novel. And the references Jackson fall flat: "Whatever walks there, walks alone. Until it doesn't. No, scrap that, it never did."

  • Her Last Word

  • By: Mary Burton
  • Narrated by: Brittany Pressley
  • Length: 10 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,512
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,266
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,253

Fourteen years ago, Kaitlin Roe was the lone witness to the abduction of her cousin Gina. She still remembers that lonely Virginia road. She can still see the masked stranger and hear Gina’s screams. And she still suffers the guilt of running away in fear and resents being interrogated as a suspect in the immediate aftermath. Now Kaitlin has only one way to assuage the pain and nightmares—by interviewing everyone associated with the unsolved crime for a podcast that could finally bring closure to a case gone cold.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Good Story!

  • By Mamacat on 06-10-18

Painfully dull, I finally quit when...

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-13-18

I guess this is a romantic novel rather than the detective story or thriller it purports to be. Maybe fans of that genre will be satisfied. The slow-burn "romance" between the victim and cop is rather disgusting, not to mention illegal and unethical, if you ask me, and when they finally dove in face first, I turned off and deleted the title. Yuck.

  • Cold Moon over Babylon

  • Valancourt 20th Century Classics
  • By: Michael McDowell
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick
  • Length: 9 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,055
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 974
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 974

Welcome to Babylon, a typical sleepy Alabama small town, where years earlier the Larkin family suffered a terrible tragedy. Now they are about to endure another: 14-year-old Margaret Larkin will be robbed of her innocence and her life by a killer who is beyond the reach of the law. But something strange is happening in Babylon: traffic lights flash an eerie blue, a ghostly hand slithers from the drain of a kitchen sink, graves erupt from the local cemetery in an implacable march of terror.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Best audible listen to date...

  • By Bree Salyer on 06-27-16

The BEST Michael McDowell ever!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-07-18

I've loved McDowell's creepy stories for many years, although not many have been made available in audio format. I had never read this gruesome tale before, and Scott Brick's infamously sonorous delivery was in every way perfect. This is a gory delight, and one I will listen to again.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Sum and Total of Now

  • By: Don Robertson
  • Narrated by: Bill Baker
  • Length: 8 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars 1
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars 1

Morris Bird III, who is trying to make do with the sum and total of his present until maturity arrives, has the usual teenage troubles - acne, his dumb name, a squabbling family, and, in this summer of 1948, the looming death of his grandmother. Morris Bird II was 13 years old, and the whole world was funny in his mind.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Sadly dated and uninspired

  • By Wild Wise Woman on 11-23-18

Sadly dated and uninspired

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-23-18

The precursor to this book, The Greatest Thing Since Sliced Bread, has been a dear favorite of mine for almost 50 years. I only recently learned that there were 2 sequels, and now I understand why. This lame Coming Of Age story features the protagonist of the first novel, but now age 13, in 1948. And he's shaping up to be the worst sort of douchy white boy that period could produce. I have no desire to read the third book after this one.

  • The Greatest Thing Since Sliced Bread

  • By: Don Robertson
  • Narrated by: Tony Barbour
  • Length: 7 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 10
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10

On a quiet autumn afternoon in 1944, nine-year-old Morris Bird III decides to visit a friend who lives on the other side of town. So he grabs the handle of his red wagon and, with his little sister in tow, begins an incredible pilgrimage across Cleveland...and out of childhood forever.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Splendid rendition of a modern American classic

  • By Wild Wise Woman on 11-16-18

Splendid rendition of a modern American classic

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-16-18

I'm mortified that this audio book has been available since 2015, and I didn't discover that until 2018. The Greatest Thing Since Sliced Bread has been one of my favorite novels since I first read it in 1972, when I was not much older than Morris Bird III. The book grows and reveals so many truths along with the reader, and narrator Tony Barbour's dry, even delivery is completely perfect.

It's hard to convey the timeless wit and wonder of this story - so tender and so funny and so inspiring. It's mostly focused on 9-year old Morris Bird the Third, in Cleveland Ohio in the midst of World War II, but encompasses the adjacent stories of his many neighbors during a single, disastrous day. The pivotal event really happened, but the characters are fictitious. Hard to believe, because Robertson's writing makes you swear you witnessed the whole thing.


  • Disappearance at Devil's Rock

  • A Novel
  • By: Paul Tremblay
  • Narrated by: Erin Bennett
  • Length: 12 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 527
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 488
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 485

Late one summer night, Elizabeth Sanderson receives the devastating news that every mother fears: Her 13-year-old son, Tommy, has vanished without a trace in the woods of a local park. The search isn't yielding any answers, and Elizabeth and her young daughter, Kate, struggle to comprehend Tommy's disappearance. They feel helpless and alone, and their sorrow is compounded by anger and frustration: The local and state police have uncovered no leads.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Creepy, eerie, and dark.

  • By Alicia on 10-16-16

Like swimming in jell-o, tolerable at 1.45x speed

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-09-18

I listened to HEAD FULL OF GHOSTS over a year ago, and recently a second time, for book club. I loved it, and found the twists and the realistic portrayals of unbalanced, hyper-eager people, especially suburban American girls, to be spot on. There's a lot of social parody in the book, and the writing leaves nothing to be desired. It helps if you're a pop horror fan, and I am.

After my second reading of HFoG, I found I'd slipped another Paul Tremblay book into my library last year, and forgotten about it, so I was glad to cue up Disappearance at Devil's Rock and ---ooohhhhhhmmmyyyyyyggggooooooddddddthisisSOOOSLOOOW. The story is redundant and BORING. Very, very little happens, and when you THINK it does, well, take my word for it, it didn't.

After the first 4 hours, when I realized I could knit an entire row between sentences, I cranked the player up to 1.75x speed. This is something I NEVER do with fiction, but it made the story move along. I wound up reducing that to 1.25x for a long drive, and it sounded completely NORMAL at that velocity! But nudged it to 1.45x for the interminable denouement.

A young teen vanishes into the woods while sneaking around with his friends. Everybody in this book is TERRIBLE at what they do. Bad mom, horrible friends, bad sons, rotten neighbors, lousy cops - you can root for the little sister, maybe, but she's not anyone we're going to want our kids to play with.

It's a very frustrating type of "mystery", because rather than the twists and turns featured in the best of the genre, nothing the reader is told turns out to be true. That's a really sh*tty trope, and makes for a really sh*tty book.

  • Lullaby

  • By: Jonathan Maberry
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick
  • Length: 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 16,682
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15,288
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 15,299

A young couple buys a beautiful house by a picturesque lake in the Catskills, looking to escape the bustle of the city to raise their newborn baby. It is a perfect place for a fresh start. Except that nothing is ever as perfect as it seems. As autumn nights close in around their home, they learn that darkness takes many forms. And sometimes that darkness is hungry. New York Times best-selling author Jonathan Maberry delivers an unsettling Audible Original that will give listeners the Halloween creeps all year round.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • I guess there’s a reason it’s free

  • By Katie Washington on 10-05-18

A sweet little creeper

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-17-18

If I believed in trigger warnings they'd be all over this review. This is a trope-laden ghost story, more sad than scary, but tightly written and delivered.