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Donna

  • 6
  • reviews
  • 3
  • helpful votes
  • 21
  • ratings
  • A Confederacy of Dunces

  • By: John Kennedy Toole
  • Narrated by: Barrett Whitener
  • Length: 13 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 5,462
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,183
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 4,190

The hero of John Kennedy Toole's incomparable, Pulitzer Prize-winning comic classic is one Ignatius J. Reilly, "huge, obese, fractious, fastidious, a latter-day Gargantua, a Don Quixote of the French Quarter". His story bursts with wholly original characters, denizens of New Orleans' lower depths, incredibly true-to-life dialogue, and the zaniest series of high and low comic adventures.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Well Done

  • By Jon on 09-18-05

JUST A LITTLE MORE AND PERFECT!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-02-18

The story was brilliant, the characters were so New Orleans -- I found myself relating them to people I knew -- probably based on real people anyway and the performance would have been absolutely perfect had the narrator accurately pronounced street names and other names as pronounced by true New Orleanians!

  • Spectacular Wickedness

  • Sex, Race, and Memory in Storyville, New Orleans
  • By: Emily Epstein Landau
  • Narrated by: Lee Ann Howlett
  • Length: 9 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 39
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 37
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 38

From 1897 to 1917 the red-light district of Storyville commercialized and even thrived on New Orleans' longstanding reputation for sin and sexual excess. This notorious neighborhood, located just outside of the French Quarter, hosted a diverse cast of characters who reflected the cultural milieu and complex social structure of turn-of-the-century New Orleans, a city infamous for both prostitution and interracial intimacy.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A fascinating [academic] read

  • By A. C. Skinner on 08-22-16

GREAT

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-17-18

If you can ignore the references to white privileged and opinion and stick to the history and facts -- great book. I don't feel the author has a personal history in New Orleans. But overall it's worth the listen.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Last Madam

  • A Life in the New Orleans Underworld
  • By: Christine Wiltz
  • Narrated by: Donna Postel
  • Length: 9 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 85
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 83
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 83

1916: Norma Wallace, age 15, arrived in New Orleans. Sexy and shrewd, she quickly went from streetwalker to madam and by 1920 had opened what became a legendary house of prostitution. There she entertained a steady stream of governors, gangsters, and movie stars until she was arrested at last in 1962. Shortly before she died in 1974, she tape-recorded her memories. With those tapes and original research, Christine Wiltz chronicles Norma's rise and fall with the social history of New Orleans.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Loved it!

  • By Sam Simpson on 01-05-19

SO NEW ORLEANS!!!!!!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-17-18

As a New Orleanian this book took me back in time. I could relate people and places in the book to stories told my by parents and grandparents and great aunts and uncles. I knew many of the people while growing up in New Orleans or my family knew them. I could imagine it all in my minds eye. Very authentic, well written and narrated. I wish I could have known Norma --what she described as night life in New Orleans is exactly what I heard from my parents like the Blue Room. I felt her pain seeing how the Quarter changed as my parents did in the late 60s and 70s.. I also wish for the glamour of their days. When my parents went out it was to the Blue Room. They spoke of Phil Harris. The Black Orchid in Gentilly -- Tony Angelo's place -- Daddy hung out there as a young man. Madam Dora Russo last house on Bayou Rd. was located across the street from my Great Aunt's beauty salon. Dora brought the new girls from the country to the salon and had my Aunts change the color of their hair. My Aunt said they were all Ladies! I could go on and on. Fantastic life story - What a Woman!!

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Haunted House Diaries

  • The True Story of a Quiet Connecticut Town in the Center of a Paranormal Mystery
  • By: William J. Hall
  • Narrated by: Callie Beaulieu, Barry Press
  • Length: 7 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 68
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 61
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 60

Nestled deep in Litchfield Hills, Connecticut, a 1790 farmhouse sits near the epicenter of a paranormal commotion. The family that resides there regularly encounters its own ancestors and strangers - human and nonhuman - who seemingly occupy the same physical space in our world while remaining in their own parallel worlds. When famous ghost hunters Ed and Lorraine Warren investigated, they dubbed it "Ghost Central".

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • The narration is beyond horrible

  • By Ttourang on 11-08-17

BORING

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-17-18

The narrator listed the numbered paranormal events in a monotone voice for half the book. I could have made up a list as such. Then the other half was OPINION of what they were. i kept waiting for the E & L Warren investigation which was a bleep, literally a paragraph. When was this woman going to bring in SOMEONE to investigate this house. Finally there was one who kept knocking religion, The Bible, and other paranormal investigators -- saying he could do it better and had a 100% success rate. They even hawked their website. I got the impression this was all about selling a book. The ABSOLUTE worst book I have listened to. If I could I would ask for my money back!

  • Food: A Cultural Culinary History

  • By: Ken Albala, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Ken Albala
  • Length: 18 hrs and 22 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,857
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,575
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,545

Eating is an indispensable human activity. As a result, whether we realize it or not, the drive to obtain food has been a major catalyst across all of history, from prehistoric times to the present. Epicure Jean-Anthelme Brillat-Savarin said it best: "Gastronomy governs the whole life of man."

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • One of my top 3 favorite courses!

  • By Jessica on 12-28-13

More facts; less Liberal/Socialist/Progressive ref

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-10-18

What did you like best about Food: A Cultural Culinary History? What did you like least?

I liked the information rooted in fact on the origin of foods and his explanation of how migration and trade routes brought spices and foods to other parts of the world. The constant slights toward the Catholic church and Christianity in general and the references to every 20th Century Socialist/Marxist/Progressive was annoying. I shouldn't be surprised -- this is a college lecture!!

Could you see Food: A Cultural Culinary History being made into a movie or a TV series? Who should the stars be?

no

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Krampus

  • The Yule Lord
  • By: Brom
  • Narrated by: Kirby Heyborne
  • Length: 16 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,157
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,086
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,090

One Christmas Eve in a small hollow in Boone County, West Virginia, struggling songwriter Jesse Walker witnesses a strange spectacle: seven devilish figures chasing a man in a red suit toward a sleigh and eight reindeer. When the reindeer leap skyward, taking the sleigh, devil men, and Santa into the clouds, screams follow. Moments later, a large sack plummets back to earth, a magical sack that thrusts the down-on-his-luck singer into the clutches of the terrifying Yule Lord, Krampus.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 stars

  • By colleen on 11-17-12

EXCELLENT STORY BUT....

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-29-18

Would you listen to Krampus again? Why?

Excellent story, but WHY must the ONE GOD be referred to as SHE?????? A total TURNOFF! Why must people who believe in the God of Abraham always get the in-your-face intolerance from the enlightened group. I get it; it's fiction! There was no explanation for the change in gender so WHY? It's disgusting! You can't just enjoy a story and lose yourself from the noise of everyday life without the agenda crap oozing its way into every aspect of life. Just a stupid decision. Otherwise, I thoroughly enjoyed the book.