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Laura

Sherman Oaks, CA, United States
  • 3
  • reviews
  • 7
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  • 4
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  • The Story of the Volsungs

  • The Volsunga Saga
  • By: Anonymous
  • Narrated by: Antony Ferguson
  • Length: 4 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 157
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 148
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 148

Originally written in Icelandic in the 13th century AD by an anonymous author, The Story of The Volsungs is a legendary saga based on Norse mythology. The epic describes the legendary history and heroic feats of several generations of mythic Viking families and derives from many sources, including preexisting Edda, or heroic poems, Norse legends, historical events, and orally transmitted folklore. The saga is imbued throughout with themes of power, jealousy, love, vengeance, and fear.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Passionate, Poetic, Bloody, Heroic, & Tragic Saga

  • By Jefferson on 03-28-12

A Great Glimpse into Early Scandinavian Culture

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-24-12

What was one of the most memorable moments of The Story of the Volsungs?

This saga is mythic - a fairy tale - but brutal as the greatest fairy tales are. In one tale, as a mother prepares to murder her children, they advise her that such a plan, although horrendous, is a parent's right.

What about Antony Ferguson’s performance did you like?

His different voices for the male and female characters really made the drama come alive.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

Brunhilda's having second thoughts about rejecting Sigurd. This woman of great wisdom lapsed into a jealous hag - timeless!

Any additional comments?

In the preface, the author states, to my surprise, that never before has this Icelandic saga been translated into English. All English-speaking readers should rejoice that the author has rectified this and so very eloquently.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Out Stealing Horses

  • By: Per Petterson
  • Narrated by: Richard Poe
  • Length: 7 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 384
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 235
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 241

Multiple award-winning author Per Petterson delivers an eloquent, meditative novel. 67-year-old Trond Sander lives secluded in a far corner of Norway. Casting his mind back to 1948, he recalls a horse-stealing prank with his best friend that turned tragic and changed his life forever.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Quiet and powerful

  • By KP on 01-24-10

Not Disappointing - Amazing!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-13-12

Would you listen to Out Stealing Horses again? Why?

To say that the ending is disappointing is to miss the point of the book. This book is a first person, stream of consciousness narrative about the impact a person's life adventures have had on him. Characters like

What about Richard Poe’s performance did you like?

Richard Poe WAS Trond, and he made me care about Trond from Minute One. His narration was understated and perfect for the book.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Eating for England

  • The Delights and Eccentricities of the British at Table
  • By: Nigel Slater
  • Narrated by: Nigel Slater
  • Length: 6 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 43
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 26
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 26

The British have a relationship with their food that is unlike that of any other country. Once something that was never discussed in polite company, it is now something with which the nation is obsessed. But are we at last developing a food culture or are we just going through the motions? Eating for England is an entertaining, detailed, and somewhat tongue-in-cheek observation of the British and their food, their cooking, their eating, and how they behave in restaurants.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A Must-Hear!

  • By Laura on 07-04-08

A Must-Hear!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-04-08

I will never read a Nigel Slater book, now that I have heard two! Not all books are well-served by being spoken, but this one - with its brief, self-contained food essays - is very enjoyable as one races around the track or (even more so) walks to the local deli. Slater's dry sardonic wit (a perfect example is his deconstruction of the trifle) is amplified when the author delightfully reads his own work.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful