LISTENER

Fredrik Pettersen

Beverly Hills, USA
  • 18
  • reviews
  • 290
  • helpful votes
  • 93
  • ratings
  • Bad Dream

  • By: Kim Newman
  • Narrated by: Kris Dyer, Joan Walker
  • Length: 16 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3

Anne Nielson, an American journalist, comes to London to investigate the strange death of her sister. Soon, she becomes sucked into a netherworld of corruption and perversion and is hurtled toward a final confrontation where she has only the dead as allies. Kim Newman is a well-known and respected author and movie critic. He writes regularly for Empire Magazine and contributes to The Guardian, The Times, Time Out and others. He makes frequent appearances on radio and TV.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Tricky to review

  • By Fredrik Pettersen on 10-15-18

Tricky to review

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-15-18

So here's the thing: I really didn't enjoy "Bad Dreams" very much, but by that I mean the story "Bad Dreams". It was messy and not at all up to Newman's usual standard. I can't tell for sure though, because it may also have been the narrator, who I could not stand; his voice was soft and squishy, and I have a suspicion the book might've been much better with another narrator.
But! In a complete surprise, this book is actually comprised of two stories, and the second one, "Bloody Students" was MUCH better, I'd go so far as to say classic Newman, in that it's a great mash-up of the zombie virus-type genre, The Blob, the Thing, and Resident Evil, all set in a British Uni. The fact that the narrator, Joan Walker, was in this case absolutely fantastic didn't hurt either. So... A one or two-star story coupled with a four or five-star story... Like I said, tricky. I'd say it's worth a credit just for "Bloody Students" in the end, but I can't give the whole package more than three stars.

  • Nemesis Games

  • By: James S. A. Corey
  • Narrated by: Jefferson Mays
  • Length: 16 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,419
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 10,505
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,468

A thousand worlds have opened, and the greatest land rush in human history has begun. As wave after wave of colonists leave, the power structures of the old solar system begin to buckle.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • An excellent bounce back

  • By Lore on 10-27-15

Huh, that was unexpected.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-12-17

I've mildly enjoyed the Expanse-series before this one; they've been solid stories in a realistic future, featuring some great characters (Arasavela) and one terrible one - Holden, sadly also the main character, as well as three underutilized ones (the rest of the crew). They've been mostly solid three-star books.

Imagine my surprise when this book opens up the story, gives Naomi a past, Alex a soul and manages to make Amos possibly the most interesting sociopath I've encountered in ages. I also spent most of the book NOT hoping Holden would die, which is a vast improvement over previous installments.

Add an apocalypse, as well as a narrator who's clearly grown into the series, and yeah... 5 stars from me.

  • The Fold

  • By: Peter Clines
  • Narrated by: Ray Porter
  • Length: 10 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 31,140
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 29,059
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 29,011

The folks in Mike Erikson's small New England town would say he's just your average, everyday guy. And that's exactly how Mike likes it. Sure, the life he's chosen isn't much of a challenge to someone with his unique gifts, but he's content with his quiet and peaceful existence. That is, until an old friend presents him with an irresistible mystery, one that Mike is uniquely qualified to solve.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Fun premise, great performance, weak story

  • By J. Klinghoffer on 08-06-15

Excellent stand-alone follow-up to "14"

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-08-15

Think Chrichton by way of Scalzi, with the pacing of Dan Brown and setting by Lovecraft.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Water Knife

  • By: Paolo Bacigalupi
  • Narrated by: Almarie Guerra
  • Length: 14 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 3,185
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,907
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,901

In the American Southwest, Nevada, Arizona, and California skirmish for dwindling shares of the Colorado River. Into the fray steps Angel Velasquez, detective, leg breaker, assassin, and spy. A Las Vegas water knife, Angel "cuts" water for his boss, Catherine Case, ensuring that her lush, luxurious arcology developments can bloom in the desert, so the rich can stay wet while the poor get nothing but dust.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • The fight for water in a drought fueled apocalypse

  • By Lore on 09-24-15

Superb world-building, good-ish plot.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-20-15

Bacigalupi builds a believable near-future, so much so I changed how my pensions are invested. It's some truly awesome futurism. The story in itself is just good, and ironically is a throwback to the hard-boiled stories of yesteryear, and not just because the squabbling over water-rights brings "Chinatown" right into focus, or the MacGuffin might as well have been a Maltese Falcon. Still, highly recommended, and I hope to revisit this world soon, though hopefully only in fiction.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • EMPEROR: The Blood of Gods, Book 5 (Unabridged)

  • By: Conn Iggulden
  • Narrated by: Michael Healy
  • Length: 13 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 51
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 47
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 47

Julius Caesar has been assassinated. A nation is in mourning. Revenge will be bloody... Rome's great hero has been brutally murdered by his most trusted allies. While these self-appointed Liberatores seek refuge in the senate, they have underestimated one man: Caesar's adopted son Octavian, a man whose name will echo through history as Augustus Caesar. Uniting with his great rival Mark Antony, Octavian will stop at nothing to seek retribution and avenge his father's death.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Terrible narrator made me wince

  • By Fredrik Pettersen on 10-07-13

Terrible narrator made me wince

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-07-13

Would you recommend this book to a friend? Why or why not?

I'd recommend it to anyone who had read the previous books, or anyone wanting to jump in (as the death of Caesar makes a good starting point). However, I would NOT recommend this Audible version, as the narrator ruins the book completely.

What didn’t you like about Michael Healy’s performance?

Everything. It was terrible. But let me try to list my main objections:

- Healy has a strange lilt to his voice that is either an accent or terrible reading skills. The upshot is that every full stop, he lifts his voice the way you sometimes do when reading to young children.

- His reading pace hardly ever changes, meaning even in tense, action-packed moments, it's as if he's reading "My dog Spot" to a room of 5-year-olds.

- He doesn't differentiate between characters as far as I could tell, meaning that when one character interrupts another, it gets reeeeally confusing.

- I don't think he's read the book beforehand; Imagine how you'd say the sentence "I think I'd quite like a sandwich and a nice cup of tea". Now imagine Healy saying, in the exact same way "You're a disgrace to Rome!..." (the exclamation point silent), and then continuing, completely obliviously (and still just as ploddingly) "...shouted Octavian and slammed his fist into the table." The disconnect between how Iggulden claimed Octavian said it and how Healy reads it would be funny, if it wasn't ruining my book.

Any additional comments?

I had to finish this book in hard-copy. Worst narration I've experienced since "Rendezvous with Rama".

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • NOS4R2

  • By: Joe Hill
  • Narrated by: Kate Mulgrew
  • Length: 19 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 162
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 155
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 156

Summer. Massachusetts. An old Silver Wraith with a frightening history. A story about one serial killer and his lingering, unfinished business.Anyone could be next. We're going to Christmasland . . .NOS4A2 is an old-fashioned horror novel in the best sense. Claustrophobic, gripping and terrifying, this is a story that will have you on the edge of the seat while you read, and leaving the lights on while you sleep.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • The apple doesn't fall far from the tree...

  • By Fredrik Pettersen on 05-16-13

The apple doesn't fall far from the tree...

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-16-13

Any additional comments?

If the cat wasn't already out of the bag about Joe Hill's semi-secret parentage, this book would have freed the feline for sure as this could easily have been one of his dad's mid-80s books. "NOS4R2" particularly channels "Christine", with a hint of "IT" (which it even references).

So, if you're a fan of King's, or of Hill's for that matter, whether to pick this up or not is an easy choice.

Oh, and I was surprised to find that this Audio-version actually contains an epilogue (hidden in the audio-book production-credits) not found in my e-book version - and it's also very well read by Kate "Janeway" Mulgrew, so if you're wondering which version to get, Audio is it.

7 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • Oryx and Crake

  • By: Margaret Atwood
  • Narrated by: Campbell Scott
  • Length: 10 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,950
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,704
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,734

The narrator of Atwood's riveting novel calls himself Snowman. When the story opens, he is sleeping in a tree, wearing an old bedsheet, mourning the loss of his beloved Oryx and his best friend Crake, and slowly starving to death. He searches for supplies in a wasteland where insects proliferate and pigoons and wolvogs ravage the pleeblands, where ordinary people once lived, and the Compounds that sheltered the extraordinary. 

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Very Scary Stuff

  • By Doug on 07-21-03

One of the great Sci-Fi novels of the age

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-30-13

Any additional comments?

This is one of the Great Science Fiction novels of the last few years - and yeah, I'm aware that me calling it Sci-Fi would annoy the author, but if it walks like a duck...

The story is set in two undisclosed futures; the 'present' of our main character Snowman, as he struggles to navigate the perils of a post-apocalyptic (a plaguealypse, this time) America, while caring for a tribe of genetically engineered post-humans; and also Snowman's past (and our near-future), where mankind is spinning ever faster towards a gene-tech driven singularity, while trying its hardest to ignore the impending ecocalypse. Snowman, then known as Jimmy, details his relationships with the two eponymous characters, Oryx and Crake, who will both have their parts to play in the catastrophe to come...

The themes themselves won't be new to any regular Sci-Fi readers; I sometimes get the feeling Atwood, like many authors who don't "do" sci-fi (Cormac McCarthy, Colson Whitehead), imagines their 'speculative fiction' is breaking new ground when they're actually on a well-worn track, both in terms of story and themes. But who cares when it's this well written?

The narration was ... well, it was good; it wasn't a detriment to the story in any way, but I sometimes felt it was overly morose. I guess that's not a criticism, just a preference; but for me, it didn't quite live up to the prose, and I found my hard-copy sessions (I always do a read-listen-read relay) more pleasurable. It could be that often the story's the thing for me, but with this particular book, the prose is an end in itself.

So yes, a whole-hearted recommendation from me - as a measure of this, I can say that I started the next novel set in this universe ("The Year of the Flood") literally the minute I had finished this - although i do recommend also going hard-copy/Kindle to get the most out of it. At any rate: Get it!

  • Gone Girl

  • A Novel
  • By: Gillian Flynn
  • Narrated by: Julia Whelan, Kirby Heyborne
  • Length: 19 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 49,798
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 44,347
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 44,439

It is Nick and Amy Dunne's fifth wedding anniversary. Presents are being wrapped and reservations are being made when Nick's clever and beautiful wife disappears from their rented McMansion on the Mississippi River. Husband-of-the-Year Nick isn't doing himself any favors with cringe-worthy daydreams. Under mounting pressure from the police and the media - as well as Amy's fiercely doting parents - the town golden boy parades an endless series of lies, deceits, and inappropriate behavior. Nick is oddly evasive, and he's definitely bitter - but is he really a killer?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Demented, twisted, sick and I loved it!

  • By Theodore on 01-20-13

Deliciously offbeat and wicked

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-27-13

Any additional comments?

I like a book that keeps me guessing, and 'Gone Girl' certainly did that... In many ways, it's the 'Scream' of crime-writing. A familiar setting, the woman who goes missing and the husband who everyone thinks did it... The difference here is that everyone, from the suspect to the cops to the witnesses have all read the same detective novels, and watched the same true crime-shows, that we have; they are all too well aware of the tropes and clichés of the script they find themselves enacting, and yet they seem unable to break out of it.

The narrators did a great job of conveying the characters they portrayed, the husband in the present reacting to his wife's disappearance and the ensuing suspicions; and the wife coming to us from beyond the grave as it were, in the form of her diary entries.

I recommend this whole-heartedly for any fan of the genre - it breaks with convention in ways that some will love and some will hate, but whatever your reaction, at least you'll have experienced something new; and that in itself is worth the price of admission.

  • The Blade Itself

  • The First Law: Book One
  • By: Joe Abercrombie
  • Narrated by: Steven Pacey
  • Length: 22 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,564
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,248
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,256

Inquisitor Glokta, a crippled and bitter relic of the last war, former fencing champion turned torturer, is trapped in a twisted and broken body - not that he allows it to distract him from his daily routine of torturing smugglers.Nobleman, dashing officer and would-be fencing champion Captain Jezal dan Luthar is living a life of ease by cheating his friends at cards. Vain and shallow, the biggest blot on his horizon is having to get out of bed in the morning to train with obsessive and boring old men.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Violent, Ironic, and Absorbing Epic Fantasy Noir

  • By Jefferson on 01-30-13

Took me by surprise with its sheer awesomeness.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-14-12

Where does The Blade Itself rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

This would rank in the top ten.

What other book might you compare The Blade Itself to and why?

It's similar to George R.R. Martin, though the world itself contains more magic. The characters and their moral opacity is very similar though. It also has some of R Scott Bakker in it, in that it presents a group of heroes and a society that we as readers are supposed to think are, well, idiotic and posturing macho prigs and pigs. The charaterizations are faaar deeper than Bakker's, though, and it's much less grim.This book is the start of a (finished) trilogy, and you won't understand the scope of Abercrombie's brilliance until you've read to the end of third book, but trust me, this series is far more subtle than it seems at first glance.

What about Steven Pacey’s performance did you like?

Honestly, everything. He was so good I will actively search out books he reads in the future. Every single character had a disctinct voice, without ever descending into parody (a common failing amongst performers who do 'voices'). The only thing that ever bothered me was his weird way of pronouncing the word grimace, but after three books I'm now on board, and will change the way I say it in the future, instead of grousing :-D

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

It is surprisingly funny, especially the internal monologue of the torturer Glokta.

Any additional comments?

Great writing, some of the best fight-scenes I've read, but also very deep characterizations and a deeper and more philosophical arc over the series than one usually expects from a fantasy series, and also deeply funny - if you have any love for Fantasy at all, buy it now, you won't be disappointed!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Last Policeman

  • By: Ben H. Winters
  • Narrated by: Peter Berkrot
  • Length: 8 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,450
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,326
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,324

What’s the point in solving murders if we’re all going to die soon, anyway? Detective Hank Palace has faced this question ever since asteroid 2011GV1 hovered into view. There’s no chance left. No hope. Just six precious months until impact. The Last Policeman presents a fascinating portrait of a pre-apocalyptic United States. The economy spirals downward while crops rot in the fields. Churches and synagogues are packed. People all over the world are walking off the job - but not Hank Palace. He’s investigating a death by hanging.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Not your regular mystery

  • By Victor @ theAudiobookBlog on 09-20-16

Excellent book with an interesting premise

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-18-12

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

Yes, already have :-)

If you were to make a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

"The End of the World is coming, but that doesn't mean you can get away with murder..."

4 of 5 people found this review helpful