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Gregory R. Martin

Baton Rouge, LA USA
  • 12
  • reviews
  • 333
  • helpful votes
  • 177
  • ratings
  • Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus

  • The Classic Guide to Understanding the Opposite Sex
  • By: John Gray
  • Narrated by: John Gray
  • Length: 1 hr and 32 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 775
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 472
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 467

Once upon a time Martians and Venusians met, fell in love, and had happy relationships together because they respected and accepted their differences. Then they came to Earth and amnesia set in: They forgot they were from different planets.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Oldie but a Goodie

  • By Shamarie on 05-01-14

Good abridgment

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-08-19

This abridged version runs about 90 minutes and covers the key concepts very well without being too repetitive. If you’re already a little familiar with the general ideas (men value independence above feelings, women value community and sharing above ego) then you may find the shorter version is enough. This book is still relevant for couples today, whether you’re only dating, newlyweds, or more seasoned.

  • Xenocide

  • By: Orson Scott Card
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick, Gabrielle de Cuir, Amanda Karr, and others
  • Length: 20 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,097
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,469
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,492

Xenocide is the third installment of the Ender series. On Lusitania, Ender found a world where humans and pequeninos and the Hive Queen could all live together; where three very different intelligent species could find common ground at last. Or so he thought. But Lusitania also harbors the descolada, a virus which kills all humans it infects, but which the pequeninos require in order to transform into adults.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • full of passion

  • By David on 06-13-04

For strong Ender fans only?

Overall
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-21-04

Most of the other reviewers have already pointed out the primary shortcomings of "Xenocide": it needed tighter editing, the characters bicker too much, some of the characters are undeveloped (especially Novinha), and the plot devices at the end are a little too convenient. I'd also add that Ender himself, the master strategist, seemed uncharacteristically befuddled and nearly senile for most of this book. Strong Ender fans will be able to overlook these problems.

I deducted an additional star from my rating for the narration of this audiobook. I greatly enjoyed the tag-team narration used in "Ender's Game" and "Speaker for the Dead". But in "Xenocide" there are two big problems that were very distracting. First, the assignment of narrators for the characters, as well as the direction, is not as consistent as in the previous audiobooks. Second, one of the narrators performs the Path characters without enunciating the ending consonants clearly. It's highly irritating, and makes these passages very difficult to understand.

4 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • Inside the C.I.A.

  • By: Ronald Kessler
  • Narrated by: Chris Lane
  • Length: 11 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 196
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 83
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 82

Based on extensive research and hundreds of interviews, including two with active directors of Central Intelligence, William H. Webster and Robert M. Gates, and with three former D.C.I.s, Inside the C.I.A. is the first in-depth, unbiased account of the Agency's core operations, its abject failures, and its resounding successes.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Pre- 9/11 look at CIA's strengths and weaknesses

  • By Gregory R. Martin on 08-14-04

Pre- 9/11 look at CIA's strengths and weaknesses

Overall
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-14-04

Sometimes fascinating, sometimes boring, and ultimately somewhat tragic, Kessler's review of the CIA provides some valuable context for readers of the 9/11 Commission report. Written before 1999, this book has little to say about terrorism, and even less to say about the direction of the CIA under Woolsey in the Clinton years. Kessler devotes a large amount of time to subjects like Iran-Contra, Aldrich Ames, the contrasting styles of Casey and Webster, and the basic structure of the CIA. The reader will get a good feel for the CIA's culture, as well as a more realistic (that is, less fictionalized and romantic) view of what the CIA does and how it operates.

Quibbles:
The narrator is, frankly, not very dynamic. Kessler also repeats some details relentlessly; the controversy over the sale of CIA-themed coffee cups and the re-defection of Vitaly Yurchenko are two particularly annoying examples. The combination of a dull, lifeless narration with frequent repetition of details occasionally makes the book a bit boring. Nevertheless, if you are interested in the CIA's history up to about 1994 this is a must-have book.

7 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • Oryx and Crake

  • By: Margaret Atwood
  • Narrated by: Campbell Scott
  • Length: 10 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,200
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,928
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,958

The narrator of Atwood's riveting novel calls himself Snowman. When the story opens, he is sleeping in a tree, wearing an old bedsheet, mourning the loss of his beloved Oryx and his best friend Crake, and slowly starving to death. He searches for supplies in a wasteland where insects proliferate and pigoons and wolvogs ravage the pleeblands, where ordinary people once lived, and the Compounds that sheltered the extraordinary. 

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Very Scary Stuff

  • By Doug on 07-21-03

Challenging book -- not for sci-fi novices

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-29-04

An enjoyable book, with vivid, unforgettable characters and haunting descriptions of a devastated future world. You'll find yourself alternatively amused and horrified by the story as it fluctuates (unintentionally?) between a comedic farce, a satirical commentary, and a sci-fi disaster movie. Stick with it -- you'll have to get through about half of the book before you figure out enough of the backstory to get hooked, but it's definitely worth it. Atwood apparently hates exposition and "info-dumps" to advance a plot, so don't expect to put your brain in neutral for this book. Therefore, I wouldn't recommend this book for readers who are new to the sci-fi genre. On the abruptness of the ending, I had no problem with it. If you pay attention to the story and the relationship between Crake and Jimmy, you won't either. The story really couldn't have ended any other way, and it isn't difficult to figure out what Snowman will do and why.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Getting Things Done

  • The Art of Stress-Free Productivity
  • By: David Allen
  • Narrated by: David Allen
  • Length: 2 hrs and 47 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 3,061
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 573
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 569

From core principles to proven tricks, Getting Things Done has the potential to transform the way you work - and the way you experience work. At any level of implementation, David Allen's entertaining and thought-provoking advice shows you how to pick up the pace without wearing yourself down.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Getting Things Done

  • By Rick on 02-28-03

No fluff, just real productivity gains

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-09-03

Simply phenomenal. If you don't know how to get your e-mail, inbox, office, home, and "honey-do" lists under control, you need this book. There isn't any fluff or existential nonsense here. David leads you through the process of organizing your stuff and making sense of it all. The tips are all practical, very detailed (having the full book for reference helps, but isn't required), and THEY WORK. I've listened twice already, and feel so much more capable of staying on top of everything. You will too. Thanks, David!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Greatest Science Fiction Stories of the 20th Century

  • By: Greg Bear, Terry Bisson, David Brin, and others
  • Narrated by: David Ackroyd, Wil Wheaton
  • Length: 6 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 407
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 228
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 226

A walk around the block, a quick drive, before shutting down your PC ? these short story collections are perfect for when you only have a few minutes to listen."

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Biased toward the last 20 years of sci-fi

  • By Gregory R. Martin on 06-30-03

Biased toward the last 20 years of sci-fi

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-30-03

The only quibble I can find with this collection is the title. This is a great collection of sci-fi short stories, but it's a reach to call it a collection of the greatest of the 20th century. The majority of the stories were published within only the last 20 years or so. However, I still recommend this collection enthusiastically because of the inclusion of "Jeffty is Five", "The 9 Billion Names of God", "Alamagoosa", and "Why I Left Harry's All Night Hamburgers". Overall, a nice introduction to the short story format of sci-fi.

36 of 36 people found this review helpful

  • The Crisis of Islam

  • Holy War and Unholy Terror
  • By: Bernard Lewis
  • Narrated by: Bernard Lewis
  • Length: 4 hrs and 44 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 678
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 196
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 192

Bernard Lewis examines the historical roots of the frustrations and resentments that dominate the Islamic world today and that are increasingly being expressed in acts of terrorism. He looks at the theological origins of political Islam and tells us what the Islamic doctrine of jihad has meant at different times in history.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Absolutely Worth It, HIghly Recommended!

  • By Frank on 04-17-03

Great

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-15-03

For most Americans, the history of the Muslim "world" is a complete mystery. The relevance of historical events such as the elimination of the caliphate is a good example of this. Americans (and most "enlightened" Europeans, too, I'd wager) are oblivious to the significance of many such cultural references that mean nothing to us but are major motivating factors for fundamentalist Islamic terrorist organizations. Listen to this book, and I promise that you'll have many "aha -- now I get it!" moments. Potential Muslim readers should be reassured to know that the author strongly emphasizes the errors in interpretation of the Koran made by terrorists like bin Laden. This book is not just a biased critique of Islam.

6 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • Slander

  • Liberal Lies About the American Right
  • By: Ann Coulter
  • Narrated by: Ann Coulter
  • Length: 5 hrs and 57 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 418
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 47
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 49

Ann Coulter, "pundit extraordinaire," takes a hard look at modern political discourse. Refreshingly honest, unerringly timely, Coulter lashes into liberals and demonstrates how the media obfuscates the issues, belittles the right and praises the left. Her outspoken manner has made her one of the most fascinating women in politics, according to George magazine. Don't miss C-SPAN's Booknotes: Ann Coulter's Slander.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Incredible how lefties just won't accept the truth

  • By Adam on 02-02-04

Exceptionally well-documented & researched

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-24-03

It is fair to criticize Ann Coulter for her abrasiveness, which does get a bit tiring at times. But one cannot fault the research that she did for this book. This is not just a collection of gripes against the mainstream media, but a case-by-case expose of brazen, shocking bias with example after example after example. She gives sources for every contention and quote. There are no doubt people who will not find Coulter's book convincing, but anyone with an open mind will be persuaded to look at the news provided by our major media outlets with a much more critical eye.

33 of 57 people found this review helpful

  • The Millionaire Next Door

  • The Surprising Secrets of America's Rich
  • By: Thomas J. Stanley Ph.D., William D. Danko Ph.D.
  • Narrated by: Cotter Smith
  • Length: 8 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,262
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,872
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,826

Listen to the incredible national best seller that is changing people's lives - and increasing their net worth. Also available:
The Millionaire Mind.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Its OK to drive a Taurus!!

  • By Stephen Dix on 03-30-05

What

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-13-03

This book details the startling results of a comprehensive study on the wealthy in America. The authors fully explain key concepts about wealth-building that will help the listener identify and change their own bad financial habits. Examples: the difference between "high-income earners" and "the rich"; who the wealthy really are; the characteristics of people who are accomplished accumulators of wealth, usually with very moderate incomes; the self-destructive behaviors of people who earn high-incomes that prevent them from accumulating wealth; what to teach your children about wealth; how the wealthy plan the transfer of their wealth to their children and grandchildren. Although long and full of statistical concepts, this book should be required reading for those who truly want to learn how to increase their wealth. There's no theoretical fluff, multi-level marketing promotion or vague "Rich Dad" slogans here. Just hard data based on actual American millionaires and how they built their fortunes.

91 of 98 people found this review helpful

  • The Next Fifty Years

  • Science in the First Half of the Twenty-First Century
  • By: John Brockman, Editor
  • Narrated by: Henry Leyva, Jennifer Wiltsie
  • Length: 7 hrs and 53 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 182
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 27
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 29

A brilliant ensemble of the world's most visionary scientists provides 25 original never-before-published essays about the advances in science and technology that we may see within our lifetimes.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Fascinating

  • By G Tucker on 04-05-03

Not for the casual science fan

Overall
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-21-03

Interesting set of essays, but beware if you aren't already familiar with the basic theories and terms in each field. This is more a recitation of the thorny theoretical problems of today than a set of predictions for how scientific discovery will shape our immediate future. Frankly, a few of the contributing scientists seem to be too insufferably pleased with their own cleverness.

20 of 25 people found this review helpful