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  • reviews
  • 5
  • helpful votes
  • 28
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  • How to Talk to Anyone

  • 92 Little Tricks for Big Success in Relationships
  • By: Leil Lowndes
  • Narrated by: Joyce Bean, Leil Lowndes
  • Length: 8 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 5,319
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 4,565
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 4,543

What is that magic quality that makes some people instantly loved and respected? Everyone wants to be their friend (or, if single, their lover!) In business, they rise swiftly to the top of the corporate ladder. What is their "Midas touch?"

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • It could do with some editing

  • By Gudrun on 04-29-16

good if outdated tips

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-30-16

There are some good ideas worth practicing and exploring, but sometimes it's woefully outdated. It's a supplement more than a bible, which should and will always be How to Win Friends and Influence People, which somehow is more relevant than this material.

0 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Wright Brothers

  • By: David McCullough
  • Narrated by: David McCullough
  • Length: 10 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,357
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,369
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,352

Two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize David McCullough tells the dramatic story behind the story about the courageous brothers who taught the world how to fly: Wilbur and Orville Wright.

On December 17, 1903, at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, Wilbur and Orville Wright's Wright Flyer became the first powered, heavier-than-air machine to achieve controlled, sustained flight with a pilot aboard. The Age of Flight had begun. How did they do it? And why?

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Great Story but narration is a little boring

  • By Vince on 08-20-15

Listenable and enjoyable history

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-03-16

How would you have changed the story to make it more enjoyable?

The Wrights as characters are hard to pin down and make likeable -- admirable, yes, but they come across as a bit lacking. The best that can be said is that they're easy to admire and they are a marvel of Yankee ingenuity.

Have you listened to any of David McCullough’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

David McCullough is one of the great historytellers of our time. Listen to anything he's narrated and try not to be absorbed in it!

  • Rebellion

  • The History of England from James I to the Glorious Revolution
  • By: Peter Ackroyd
  • Narrated by: Clive Chafer
  • Length: 19 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 231
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 213
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 212

England's turbulent seventeenth century is vividly laid out before us, but so too is the cultural and social life of the period, notable for its extraordinarily rich literature, including Shakespeare's late masterpieces, Jacobean tragedy, the poetry of John Donne and Milton, and Thomas Hobbes's great philosophical treatise, Leviathan. Rebellion also gives us a very real sense of the lives of ordinary English men and women, lived out against a backdrop of constant disruption and uncertainty.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Essential Background Plus A Good Story

  • By Kathy on 02-01-15

Interesting and saucy

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-16-15

What made the experience of listening to Rebellion the most enjoyable?

The author focused on the theme, rebellion, and as a result included plenty of saucy details in an age of wit and irreverence. The narrator was great.

Who was your favorite character and why?

PEPYS.

Which character – as performed by Clive Chafer – was your favorite?

Pepys. A million times Pepys.

Any additional comments?

The author glossed over the true significance of the era. The Civil War was the penultimate event of the liberal western tradition that started with the ancient Greeks. The American and French revolutions, and thus the modern western tradition, wouldn't be possible without the rebellions against the Stuarts. None of this is touched upon, and it doesn't make use of any authoritative sources; it's merely a good collection of biographies and events.

  • The Rise and Fall of the British Empire

  • By: Patrick N. Allitt, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Patrick N. Allitt
  • Length: 18 hrs and 9 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,379
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,238
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,227

What were the forces that thrust the British Empire to its extraordinary position of greatness and then just as powerfully drove it into decline? And why is nearly every nation on earth, in one way or another, the consequence of the British Empire?In these 36 lectures, Professor Allitt leads you through four centuries of British power, innovation, influence, and, ultimately, diminishment-four profound centuries that literally remade the world and bequeathed the complex global legacy that continues to shape your everyday life.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Learn About Great Britain from a Great Briton!!!

  • By Mike on 04-26-14

Sunrise and sunset of the British Empire

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-19-15

Would you listen to The Rise and Fall of the British Empire again? Why?

It was pretty thorough and a good survey, but I can't imagine any reason to listen again.

What did you like best about this story?

Professor Allitt seems to have a pretty good command of the material, vast as it is, and he presents it well.

  • Turning Points in American History

  • By: Edward T. O'Donnell, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Edward T. O'Donnell
  • Length: 24 hrs and 28 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 634
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 562
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 558

These 48 lectures are your chance to relive the most groundbreaking moments in the fascinating story of the United States. They offer you a different perspective on the sweeping narrative of U.S. history. Spanning the arrival of the first English colonists to the chaos of the Civil War to the birth of the computer age and beyond, this lecture series is a captivating and comprehensive tour of those particular moments in the story of America, after which the nation would never be the same again.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliant, Informative, Entertaining!

  • By Quaker on 04-01-15

Totally boring

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-06-15

Would you recommend this book to a friend? Why or why not?

No. Prof O'Donnell may be a good professor, I don't know, but he doesn't know how to craft a narrative, and he delivers everything as if he was reading from a book.

Any additional comments?

If you never took an American history class in college, this might be a decent choice for you. Otherwise, if you're like me, you won't find anything interesting, insightful, or new about this book. It just spins the same old yarn that you learned throughout high school and college delivered like a bedtime story.

1 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • The Men Who Lost America: British Leadership, the American Revolution and the Fate of the Empire

  • The Lewis Walpole Series in Eighteenth-Century Culture and History
  • By: Andrew Jackson O'Shaughnessy
  • Narrated by: Gildart Jackson
  • Length: 21 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 188
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 174
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 171

The loss of America was a stunning and unexpected defeat for the powerful British Empire. Common wisdom has held that incompetent military commanders and political leaders in Britain must have been to blame, but were they? This intriguing audiobook makes a different argument. Weaving together the personal stories of ten prominent men historian Andrew O'Shaughnessy dispels the incompetence myth and uncovers the real reasons that rebellious colonials were able to achieve victory.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent!

  • By Rayl on 10-31-16

It didn't lose me

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-28-15

What did you love best about The Men Who Lost America: British Leadership, the American Revolution and the Fate of the Empire?

Excellent story that was well researched, performed, and organized.

What did you like best about this story?

Always interesting or entertaining.

Which character – as performed by Gildart Jackson – was your favorite?

Most of them come off as sympathetic, though Lord North was especially so. When taunted by an opposition member with North's habit of sleeping in the House, “Even now, in the midst of these perils, the noble lord is asleep,” North replied, “I wish to God I were,”.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

Moved to know as a longtime American History buff there is still plenty to learn.

Any additional comments?

Probably one of the best audiobooks I have ever read.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • The History of the English Language, 2nd Edition

  • By: Seth Lerer, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Seth Lerer
  • Length: 18 hrs and 27 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 284
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 245
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 246

This course offers an overview of the English language that is literary, historical, cultural, political, and scientific in its scope and designed to give you greater insight into the written and spoken word.The lectures provide a thorough understanding of the history of the English language - from its origins as a dialect of the Germanic-speaking peoples through the literary and cultural documents of its 1,500-year span to the state of American speech today.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Sparkling

  • By Amazon Customer on 02-26-15

Pedantic and uninteresting for amateur listeners

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-30-15

Would you say that listening to this book was time well-spent? Why or why not?

No. Most of the material was above my head or outside of my interest. I came to this course after seeing the excellent BBC series "The Adventure of English" and wanted a deeper understanding of the history and development of our language, but this was a pedantic and uninteresting tirade-like overview of the language.

Would you be willing to try another one of Professor Seth Lerer’s performances?

Not from Prof Lerer. I thought he was kind of pretentious.

Do you think The History of the English Language, 2nd Edition needs a follow-up book? Why or why not?

I didn't finish the first one so I can't see why I would ever get a followup.

1 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • The Story of Human Language

  • By: John McWhorter, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: John McWhorter
  • Length: 18 hrs and 15 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,950
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,675
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,638

Language defines us as a species, placing humans head and shoulders above even the most proficient animal communicators. But it also beguiles us with its endless mysteries, allowing us to ponder why different languages emerged, why there isn't simply a single language, how languages change over time and whether that's good or bad, and how languages die out and become extinct.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • You'll Never Look at Languages the Same Way Again

  • By SAMA on 03-11-14

Decent overview, but largely unsatifactory

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-30-15

Is there anything you would change about this book?

Prof McWhorter; He seems to know his stuff alright, but he is completely awkward in his performance, and much of his focus is on material and topics that I found boring.

What was the most interesting aspect of this story? The least interesting?

The stuff about Indo-European was pretty interesting.

What did you like about the performance? What did you dislike?

Prof McWhorter's jokes were awkward and almost always fell flat. He made references about obscure things, and I was often baffled about what he was talking about.

Was The Story of Human Language worth the listening time?

No.