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RoamingChile

AMBRIDGE, PA, US
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  • The Narnian

  • The Life and Imagination of C.S. Lewis
  • By: Alan Jacobs
  • Narrated by: Alan Jacobs
  • Length: 9 hrs and 45 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 167
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 94
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 94

The White Witch, Aslan, fauns and talking beasts, centaurs and epic battles between good and evil: these have become a part of our collective imagination through the classic volumes of The Chronicles of Narnia. Yet who was the man who created this world? This audiobook attempts to unearth the making of the first Narnian, C. S. Lewis himself.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • C.S. Lewis, lover of fairy tales

  • By RoamingChile on 01-20-06

C.S. Lewis, lover of fairy tales

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-20-06

"The Narnian" gives a glimpse into why C.S. Lewis, Oxford scholar and Christian apologist, wrote fairy tales. It is a fairly complete biography, starting in childhood and ending in Lewis's death in 1963. It also looks into the effects of World War I, the Inklings and more.

At the start, Alan Jacobs deviates a bit too much from biography toward analysis of the Narnia books (containing spoilers). However, the analysis stems from Jacobs desire to take clues about Lewis's life from his writings. The exercise is often quite revealing.

Jacobs also touches on how Aslan came to be the hero of Narnia... stating that the Christian allegory -- in at least "The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe" -- came forth during the writing process and not by C.S. Lewis's conscious design. Lewis was just trying to tell a good story -- a great fairy tale -- that would grab children's attention.

10 of 10 people found this review helpful

The Screwtape Letters audiobook cover art
  • The Screwtape Letters

  • By: C.S. Lewis
  • Narrated by: John Cleese
  • Length: 3 hrs and 1 min
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 888
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 181
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 186

John Cleese's performance brings The Screwtape Letters to life, conveying all the irony, comedy, and terror of this modern spiritual masterpiece.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The Screwtape Letters

  • By Linda on 12-31-02

Perfect reader; fun yet thought-provoking work

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-20-06

John Cleese of Monty Python fame is the perfect British voice to bring Screwtape to life -- devilishly delightful.

C.S. Lewis's imaginative letters give us a fresh and urgent view of everyday temptations.

  • The Young Messiah (Movie tie-in) (Originally Published as Christ the Lord: Out of Egypt)

  • A Novel
  • By: Anne Rice
  • Narrated by: Josh Heine
  • Length: 9 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 497
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 198
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 203

Having completed the two cycles of legend to which she has devoted her career so far, Anne Rice gives us now her most ambitious and courageous book, a novel about the early years of Christ the Lord, based on the Gospels and on the most respected New Testament scholarship.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A tad short of excellent

  • By R. Moore on 11-20-05

fascinating picture of Jesus the boy

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-20-06

This is a great look at Jesus from an angle we hardly see -- Jesus the boy. What must it have been like to grow up in the Roman-ruled world? Anne Rice gives a version that is plausible and definately thought-provoking.

The perspective is a distinctively Roman Catholic one, but that shouldn't turn off Protestant readers. Take the legends and dogma with a grain of salt and move on. Move on because Rice sets up the historical context in which Jesus became a man and then a teacher. (Rice's theory on Mary the perpetual virgin is deft at explaining Jesus's "brothers and sisters" mentioned in the gospels.)

Rice also gives a portrait of Joseph that is touching. We know almost nothing about Joseph the carpenter, but Rice captures a man of God trying to make sense of his burden while trying to be a good father to this mysterious boy.

She works a little too hard working in players that I doubt Jesus encountered as a child (the future high priest Caiaphas), but the idea that Israel is that small and the family lines that intertwined is interesting.

I'd never before read an Anne Rice novel, but I'd heard about her devotion to researching historical background to add authenticity to her work. I was also intrigued by her jump from vampires to Jesus Christ.

She explains how she came to write "Christ the Lord" in a long author's note at the end. It may make a great prologue for fans wondering why the queen of vampires has written a doxology to Jesus Christ.

6 of 6 people found this review helpful