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  • 18
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  • 1776

  • By: David McCullough
  • Narrated by: David McCullough
  • Length: 11 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,381
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,723
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,696

In this stirring audiobook, David McCullough tells the intensely human story of those who marched with General George Washington in the year of the Declaration of Independence, when the whole American cause was riding on their success, without which all hope for independence would have been dashed and the noble ideals of the Declaration would have amounted to little more than words on paper.  

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Front Seat on History

  • By Mark on 10-22-05

huge disappointment from McCullough

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-30-18

as s huge fan of David McCullough i was eager to listen to such a vibrant and important part of our nation's history.

I'm not sure how this book came too be. it starts well after the beginning of the war with the battle of Boston, moves to excruciating detail of the battle losses of New York, then the defeat of the British at Trenton. the end.

in the final minutes of the book he briefly wrote of the few generals left and a passing comment of the surrender at Yorktown.

i suppose you have to take the title of the book quite literally. it is ONLY what happened in 1776.

it just came up so short I'm my expectations of a writer such as McCullough.

His age is clearly audible in his narration and at times distracting. This isn't his best work. Not by a long shot.

  • The Civil War: A Narrative, Volume I, Fort Sumter to Perryville

  • By: Shelby Foote
  • Narrated by: Grover Gardner
  • Length: 42 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,221
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,195
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,196

The Civil War: A Narrative, Volume 1 begins one of the most remarkable works of history ever fashioned. All the great battles are here, of course, from Bull Run through Shiloh, the Seven Days Battles, and Antietam, but so are the smaller ones: Ball's Bluff, Fort Donelson, Pea Ridge, Island Ten, New Orleans, and Monitor versus Merrimac.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Storytelling brilliance

  • By Tad Davis on 07-17-08

If you like details this is for you

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-26-17

Shelby Foote is an amazing story teller. If you want highlights of battles Bruce Catton is your guy. If you want an incredible amount of detail Shelby wins hands down.

You had better have a LOT of time to listen cause these books are long. Shelby goes very deep into the social, political at local, state and national level and then he details the actual battles in amazing detail.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Ghost Rider

  • Travels on the Healing Road
  • By: Neil Peart
  • Narrated by: Brian Sutherland
  • Length: 15 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 368
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 337
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 344

In less than a year, Neil Peart lost both his 19-year-old daughter, Selena, and his wife, Jackie. Faced with overwhelming sadness and isolated from the world in his home on the lake, Peart was left without direction. That lack of direction lead him on a 55,000 mile journey by motorcycle across much of North America, down through Mexico to Belize, and back again.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Not happy, but fascinating

  • By Jim In Texas! on 09-25-14

A man's journey to accepting his. it is, what is

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-15-16

This book by Neil Peart the drummer for the band RUSH tells the story of how even the "Rich and Famous" are affected by the loss of those you love. The opening chapters are riveting as he lights the fuse of his journey rocket. The feelings and emotions are raw, real and, let's face it quite sad.

Neil's only recourse..... "Keep moving"

It's important to note that this story didn't start out to be a book. Like many books it was a personal collection of his thoughts and feelings in the form of a journal. It wasn't until sometime after he collected this thoughts and put them in the form of a book.

So the story begins, with lost love and his journey to accepting "what is" his chosen method is the Motorcycle. His bike becomes a metaphor for his personal, emotional, and spiritual survival. As long as he keeps moving, his mind remains occupied.

The early parts of the book were great. His travels across Canada, to Alaska, and the Arctic circle. His trip continues back through Alaska, and into Washington, California and then the deserts of the Midwest, then to Mexico. Each of these "mini trips" told with great detail. Detail so clear you can almost be riding with him...

For me as the story continued it started to become ... Bla Bla Bla... His letters to his best friend Brutus seemed to be a crutch for actual writing a book. Perhaps because it wasn't a book originally...

Towards the end, Neil takes you at times on what seems like a day by day account of his life in the late 1990's both on and off his bike. Life as a famous drummer, Friend and human. Then he kind of skips a few years, says he got re-married and they live happily ever after..

I was left with a WTH just happened moment. In my mind he kind of "punted" the ending... After a long journey you often look back, and after the Ghost Rider journey I looked back and could easily see the wake of the writing.

Phase 1 A lot of detail, feelings emotions, and suffering

Phase 2 I'm getting board now but I have to make more pages

Phase 3 Page count hit... We all lived happily ever after

In short, it is a good enough book that I gave it 4 stars across the board. I'm glad I listened to it, but it is not one I'd listen to a second time.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • The Wright Brothers

  • By: David McCullough
  • Narrated by: David McCullough
  • Length: 10 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,336
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,351
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,335

Two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize David McCullough tells the dramatic story behind the story about the courageous brothers who taught the world how to fly: Wilbur and Orville Wright.

On December 17, 1903, at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, Wilbur and Orville Wright's Wright Flyer became the first powered, heavier-than-air machine to achieve controlled, sustained flight with a pilot aboard. The Age of Flight had begun. How did they do it? And why?

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Great Story but narration is a little boring

  • By Vince on 08-20-15

Loved it..

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-19-15

What made the experience of listening to The Wright Brothers the most enjoyable?

Having heard Mr McCullough on a recent NPR radio program promoting the book, it was clear he had done extensive research. Living in NC myself, and having visited Kitty Hawk as a tourist the material seemed relatable.

What was one of the most memorable moments of The Wright Brothers?

Mr McCullough's depiction of the humbleness of the two brothers and their kindness to all that they encountered. Their unwavering commitment to their beliefs both personally and professionally makes one proud to be an American

What does David McCullough bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

David's voice brought a warmth to the brothers that mere words would not have done justice.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

Commit and Conquer the air with kindness and tenacity

Any additional comments?

Almost every American knows the names Wilbur and Orville Wright. They know Kitty Hawk as the birthplace of flight. But few know the depths of their commitment to the task, and to each other and their closest friends and family. Their true kind hearts and lack of material gain is as refreshing a story as you will ever hear. I felt like I was watching it happen and couldn't wait for the next story.

  • American Sniper

  • The Autobiography of the Most Lethal Sniper in U.S. Military History
  • By: Chris Kyle, Scott McEwan, Jim DeFelice
  • Narrated by: John Pruden
  • Length: 10 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 23,596
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 20,693
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 20,703

From 1999 to 2009, U.S. Navy SEAL Chris Kyle recorded the most career sniper kills in United States military history. The Pentagon has officially confirmed more than 150 of Kyles kills (the previous American record was 109), but it has declined to verify the astonishing total number for this book. Iraqi insurgents feared Kyle so much they named him al-Shaitan ("the devil") and placed a bounty on his head.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • It's been censored by the publisher

  • By K9NSP on 10-21-17

A real sence of who Chris Kyle was as a person and

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-11-13

What made the experience of listening to American Sniper the most enjoyable?

I liked learning what made Chris tick. From his early days in Texas growing up, through his troubles with getting into the military at all, and through his efforts in the middle east. Never was there TOO much of one area before he quickly rejoined the story in Iraq/Afghanistan.

Who was your favorite character and why?

I enjoyed the section his wife Tia (sp?) wrote... it added a third dimension to his stories told from a completely non military perspective, yet it added depth to the overall story I found very enjoyable. I didn't much care for the manner in which John Pruden read her parts. The publisher sped up the cadence to a point it sounded almost dumb.

Have you listened to any of John Pruden’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

I have never listened to John before.. Overall I think he did a fabulous job communicating in a way that it almost could have been Chris speaking the part

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

There is a point in the book, in which he talks about doing so many near miss, what would have been fatal encounters thought out his multiple deployments. His wife says he must have a superman cape keeping him safe. Knowing that Chris lost his life,, not in battle, but on US soil to a mentally ill soldier he was attempting to help, was both sad and sobering.

It wasn't just the sadness of his sudden death, but his humor and the stories of off the battlefield shenanigans got had me chuckling throughout.. He seemed to have been an awesome young man. Someone I hope my son grows up to be like..