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A. Yoshida

  • 252
  • reviews
  • 3,096
  • helpful votes
  • 422
  • ratings
  • Legacies of Great Economists

  • By: Timothy Taylor, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Timothy Taylor
  • Length: 7 hrs and 24 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 218
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 192
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 193

When it comes to economics and economic theory, a few thinkers dominate the landscape. Adam Smith, Karl Marx, Alfred Marshall, John Maynard Keynes, and a handful of others have shaped the world of economics and influenced our lives. These 10 lectures acquaint you with the thoughts, theories, and lives of these great economists.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A fine basic survey: a home run for Prof. Taylor

  • By Philo on 03-19-14

History of Economics

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-12-18

The lectures are conversational and the content engaging (for those interested in the history of economics). It's fascinating how some the famous economists have crossed paths and refined their theories through letters and lively debate.

  • The Year of Less

  • How I Stopped Shopping, Gave Away My Belongings, and Discovered Life Is Worth More Than Anything You Can Buy in a Store
  • By: Cait Flanders
  • Narrated by: Cait Flanders
  • Length: 5 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 880
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 805
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 806

In her late 20s, Cait Flanders found herself stuck in the consumerism cycle that grips so many of us: earn more, buy more, want more, rinse, repeat. Even after she worked her way out of nearly $30,000 of consumer debt, her old habits took hold again. When she realized that nothing she was doing or buying was making her happy - only keeping her from meeting her goals - she decided to set herself a challenge: she would not shop for an entire year. The Year of Less documents Cait's life for 12 months during which she bought only consumables.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Twenty-something coming of age

  • By Kate Terrell on 06-23-18

More of a memoir than guide

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-07-18

It's a story about the author's long journey to quit her many addictions - drug, alcohol, food, and spending. Black-outs and mounting credit card debts weren't enough to get her to change her ways. She has gone through cycles of hitting bottom, quitting, and relapsing. This book is more of a memoir about overcoming addictions than a guide on spending less.

  • A Conspiracy in Belgravia

  • By: Sherry Thomas
  • Narrated by: Kate Reading
  • Length: 10 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,501
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1,401
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,399

Being shunned by society gives Charlotte Holmes the time and freedom to put her extraordinary powers of deduction to good use. As "Sherlock Holmes, consulting detective", aided by the capable Mrs. Watson, she has had great success helping with all manner of inquiries, but she is not prepared for the new client who arrives at her Upper Baker Street office. Lady Ingram, wife of Charlotte's dear friend and benefactor, wants Sherlock Holmes to find her first love, who failed to show up at their annual rendezvous.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Be the change you want to see in the world!

  • By bluestategirl on 01-24-18

Keyword Cipher

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-05-18

Learn about keyword cipher before starting the book. There is frequent mention of codes and different cipher methods. It would be more interesting to understand how the villains are communicating through codes and rotating keywords to keep it uncrackable. I didn't care for the occasional reference to Charlotte Holmes' disreputable past with just hints of what that could have been.

  • Andrea Vernon and the Corporation for UltraHuman Protection

  • By: Alexander C. Kane
  • Narrated by: Bahni Turpin
  • Length: 8 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,584
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,454
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,448

Andrea Vernon always thought she would spend her life living in Paris writing thought-provoking historical novels all day and sipping wine on the Seine all night. But the reality is she's drowning in debt, has no prospects, and is forced to move back to Queens, where her parents remind her daily that they are very interested in grandchildren. Then, one morning, she is kidnapped, interviewed, and hired as an administrative assistant by the Corporation for UltraHuman Protection. Superheroes for hire, using their powers for good. What could possibly go wrong?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Normal Life in an Abnormal World

  • By Arthur D. Rich on 08-26-17

Great narrator

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-28-18

It's "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy" meets "The Office." Ms. Persephone Oh, head of operations for the Corporation for UltraHuman Protection (CUP), steals the show with her outrageous, southern metaphors. Occasionally it's difficult to keep track of all the characters with their silly names, like The Big Axe, Rabbi Diamond, Tiger-man, Kitchen Sink, and Inspector Well Actually (just to name a few). You have to appreciate the silliness and corporate satire to enjoy this book.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Paradox of Choice

  • Why More is Less
  • By: Barry Schwartz
  • Narrated by: Ken Kliban
  • Length: 7 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 967
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 794
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 792

By synthesizing current research in the social sciences, Schwartz makes the counterintuitive case that eliminating choices can greatly reduce the stress, anxiety, and busyness of our lives. He offers eleven practical steps on how to limit choices to a manageable number, have the discipline to focus on the important ones and ignore the rest, and ultimately derive greater satisfaction from the choices you have to make.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • The Tyranny of Pop Economics

  • By Darwin8u on 10-28-13

Seek to satisfice versus maximize

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-19-18

More choices could mean a higher likelihood of getting exactly what we want. But too many choices could mean dissatisfaction. The author explains how the conventional wisdom of more choices is wrong and how we would be better off by:
- Seeking what's good enough instead of seeking the best.
- Lowering our expectations about the results of our decisions.
- Paying less attention to what others around us are doing.

In a study where either 6 varieties or 24 varieties of jam were available for people to sample, more people were interested when there were 24 varieties displayed. However, only 3% of the people exposed to the large array of jams bought a jar, while 30% of the people exposed to the small array bought a jar. Too many choices discourage consumers to make a purchase because of the effort needed to select one. With information overload, consumers decide not to decide. If a decision is made, the effort expended detract from the enjoyment derived from the purchase.

The book describes many ways to ease the burden of making a decision and lessen the stress and dissatisfaction from making picking one. Some of the content is based on research done by Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky. If you're already familiar with their work, some of the content is repetitive.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • A Scone to Die For

  • Oxford Tearoom Cozy Mysteries, Book 1
  • By: H.Y. Hanna
  • Narrated by: Pearl Hewitt
  • Length: 6 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 783
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 709
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 701

When an American tourist is murdered with a scone in Gemma Rose's quaint English tearoom, she suddenly finds herself apron-deep in a mystery involving long-buried secrets from Oxford's past. Armed with her insider knowledge of the university and with the help of four nosy old ladies from her local Cotswolds village (not to mention a cheeky little tabby cat named Muesli), Gemma sets out to solve the mystery - all while dealing with her matchmaking mother and the return of her old college love, Devlin O'Connor, now a dashing CID detective.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Ignore the cover and buy this cozy mystery

  • By Eddie Lynn on 10-01-16

Light, funny mystery

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-14-18

It's a light, funny mystery with a little romantic tension thrown in. Readers who expect that from this book will enjoy it. It's a book where you shouldn't delve too deep into the characters (like why would Gemma dream of opening up a tea shop when she doesn't even know how to cook and how did the handsome, musical, hot-tempered Devlin end up being a detective and wealthy). Otherwise, the inconsistency in some of the characters makes the book unsatisfying.

  • You Do You

  • How to Be Who You Are and Use What You've Got to Get What You Want
  • By: Sarah Knight
  • Narrated by: Sarah Knight
  • Length: 4 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 641
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 577
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 576

From the New York Times best-selling author of The Life-Changing Magic of Not Giving a F*ck and Get Your Sh*t Together comes more straight talk about how to stand up for who you are and what you really want, need, and deserve - showing when it's okay to be selfish, why it's pointless to be perfect, and how to be "difficult". Being yourself should be easy, yet too many of us struggle to live on other people's terms instead of our own. Rather than feeling large and in charge, we feel little and belittled.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Review of You Do You: How to Be Who You Are...

  • By Handy Cathi on 12-28-17

Typical life advice but with cursing

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-14-18

The author's "no bulls*t" advice is simply that she's cursing while giving advice and making it sound more dramatic than it actually is. For example, she gives the advice to be selfish - but with the caveat that you shouldn't hurt others in getting what you want. This is the same advice of "taking care of yourself first" expressed by so many others. This book is more for young adults who are just bumping into life obstacles and find the sample responses helpful.

  • Side Effects

  • By: Woody Allen
  • Narrated by: Woody Allen
  • Length: 3 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 508
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 324
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 331

Now, available in audio for the first time, Side Effects is narrated by Woody Allen himself. A humor classic by one of the world’s funniest writers, Side Effects is a treat for Allen fans and those just discovering how gifted he is. In classics including "Remembering Needleman", "The Kugelmass Episode", "Confessions of a Burglar", and others, Allen discusses such subjects as the nature of relativity, the UFO menace, and the predicament of modern man.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • For Woody Allen's fans

  • By A. Yoshida on 07-01-18

For Woody Allen's fans

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-01-18

Typical of Woody Allen, the humor is offbeat, quirky, and sometimes witty. The book was written in 1980 when his humor wasn't as refined and polished as it is now. Also, many of the stories reflect his preoccupation with sex in awkward situations (like dating the daughter and being attracted to the mother). Only true fans of Woody Allen would enjoy this book.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Everything That Remains

  • A Memoir by the Minimalists
  • By: Joshua Fields Millburn, Ryan Nicodemus
  • Narrated by: Justin Malik
  • Length: 5 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 759
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 662
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 664

What if everything you ever wanted isn't what you actually want? Twenty-something, suit-clad, and upwardly mobile, Joshua Fields Millburn thought he had everything anyone could ever want. Until he didn't anymore. Blindsided by the loss of his mother and his marriage, Millburn started questioning the life he had built for himself.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Audio is best format for this

  • By Mark on 03-10-17

You don't possess your possessions, they possess u

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-25-18

I give this book 3.5 stars. The first half of the book was dull. It was a shallow recollection of the hard times in the author's life (what prompted his minimalist journey) - an alcoholic mother, her early death from cancer, and his failed marriage. He doesn't even mention what led to the divorce other than that it was a good marriage, but not a great marriage (yawn... hardly a page-turner). Then there are interruptions, interjections, and comments from his friend inserted into the first-person narrative. Like a private joke known only between friends, most of these smart-alecky insertions aren't amusing to outsiders. The second half of the book is okay. Some of it is interesting (going from Brooks Brothers suits and a high-paying corporate job to a tiny apartment and no television). It prompts you to reflect on your own life and all your material possessions - things you have to pay off, things you have to keep organized, and things you have to clean. Soon you don't possess your possessions, they possess you.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Unfu*k Yourself

  • By: Gary John Bishop
  • Narrated by: Gary John Bishop
  • Length: 3 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17,651
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15,193
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15,013

Are you tired of feeling f*cked up? If you are, Gary John Bishop has the answer. In this straightforward handbook, he gives you the tools and advice you need to demolish the slag weighing you down and become the truly unf*cked version of yourself. "Wake up to the miracle you are," he directs. "Here's what you've forgotten: You're a f*cking miracle of being." It isn't other people that are standing in your way; it isn't even your circumstances that are blocking your ability to thrive. It's yourself and the negative self-talk you keep telling yourself.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Now I'm F'd for sure!

  • By Kerry Strong on 08-24-17

YOU need to change

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-13-18

One of the quotes in the book is from Seneca, "Fate leads the willing and drags along the reluctant." This epitomizes the theme of the book. If you want a better future, YOU have to take action. If you want to lose weight, eat healthy and exercise. If you want a better job, develop some marketable skills and apply for other jobs. If you want to get out of debt, reduce your spending and pay off your debts. If you want a happy relationship, end your destructive relationship and meet new people. For most problems, the solutions are obvious... or at least the initial steps to move forward. Many people fail to do even that. But of course, the hard part is making a change. How often do people complain about their jobs but haven't even applied for another job? The book is essentially encouragement written in a bunch of different ways.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful