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Farren Joy

  • 18
  • reviews
  • 8
  • helpful votes
  • 36
  • ratings
  • Instrument of War

  • The German Army 1914-18
  • By: Dennis E. Showalter
  • Narrated by: Julian Elfer
  • Length: 10 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 1
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 1

Drawing on more than a half-century of research and teaching, Dennis Showalter presents a fresh perspective on the German Army during World War I. Showalter surveys an army at the heart of a national identity, driven by - yet also defeated by - warfare in the modern age, that struggled to capitalize on its victories, and ultimately forgot the lessons of its defeat.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • German Side Of WW1

  • By Farren Joy on 06-21-18

German Side Of WW1

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-21-18

Excellent book. German Armies War, just a dash of Navy. Not a General History Of All sides. Some new material for me at least. Well reasoned and written

  • Kill the Dead

  • Sandman Slim, Book 2
  • By: Richard Kadrey
  • Narrated by: MacLeod Andrews
  • Length: 13 hrs and 25 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,418
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,142
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,143

James Stark, a.k.a. Sandman Slim, crawled out of Hell, took bloody revenge for his girlfriend’s murder, and saved the world along the way. After that, what do you do for an encore? You take a lousy job tracking down monsters for money. It’s a depressing gig, but it pays for your beer and cigarettes. But in L.A., things can always get worse. Like when Lucifer comes to town to supervise his movie biography and drafts Stark as his bodyguard.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • EVERYBODY IN CALIFORNIA IS A BUDDHIST FOR ABOUT 15

  • By Jim "The Impatient" on 12-20-14

Going Downhill

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-20-18

Book one was significantly flawed but I gave Book two in series a chance. More flaws. Angels, Fallen Angels, God, Magicians, Zombies, Humans, Los Angeles, The Department Of Homeland Security, Our Main Character - all seem to be lacking in any redemptive qualities. Not really sure what the authors message is? Is the message there is no message? Maybe it’s all explained in Book Three?

  • Sandman Slim

  • By: Richard Kadrey
  • Narrated by: MacLeod Andrews
  • Length: 10 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 4,172
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,715
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 3,726

When he was 19, James Stark was considered to be one of the greatest natural magicians, a reputation that got him demon-snatched and sent downtown - to Hell - where he survived as a gladiator, a sideshow freak entertaining Satan's fallen angels. That was 11 years ago. Now, the hitman who goes only by Stark has escaped and is back in L.A. Armed with a fortune-telling coin, a black bone knife, and an infernal key, Stark is determined to destroy the magic circle.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • jack bauer + spawn = sandman slim

  • By Mike Naka on 11-03-12

It Has Series Potential But

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-20-18

This is the first book in series. I was looking for something along the supernatural magic noir lines since Jim Butcher has been a real slacker when it comes to getting out the next Harry Dresden novel. This book has all the pieces of a great book but just doesn’t manage to deliver in the end. There are some really good ideas but the plot holes and choppy storyline are hard to get past. The main character is a dysfunctional antihero. He has some power - but what exactly that is - Well it’s never really explained. He was sent to Hell by the villain at age 19 and spends 11 years there as a gladiator then assassin. Then he escapes. How did he survive as a human in the arena? Sort of explained but not. The fallen Angels Of Hell are apparently stupid and he escapes back to earth. Seeking vengeance on the group that sent him to Hell this hardened gladiator returns to earth and gets shot in the chest right off the bat by the most inept character in the book. This guy has taken on the worst of the worst off hell and triumphs but let’s himself get shot by a simple human? Our antihero clearly isn’t smart, nor much of a ninja assassin it seems. He is sort of a disgruntled, sulky angry 30 year old teenager with understandable but unredeeming anger issues. Of course he smokes and drinks like John Constantine. His real superpower seems to be the ability to get ripped apart (literally) but never killed. Now Angels and Fallen Angels can be and are killed. Nonsensical as it sounds even our antihero can be killed, but we’ll he just isn’t for some reason. A powerful magician before he went to hell and even more deadly after learning “Hell” magic he never seems to use any interesting magic. Nope - it’s knives, guns, and superhuman strength he developed in Hell that he uses primarily. He has this really interesting sort of snarky oracle coin that was cool, but he gives it away. Hmmm. The villain is a nonentity in the book which makes the finale uninspiring. That said there was - is potential here.

  • Forest

  • The Afterlife Investigations, Book 2
  • By: Ambrose Ibsen
  • Narrated by: Joe Hempel
  • Length: 5 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 205
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 191
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 191

Professor Stephen Barlow is no longer a skeptic. Having faced the horrors of Chaythe Asylum, he turns his attention to the man responsible for the Third Ward Incident - the enigmatic Dr. Corvine - in the hopes of finding answers to his many questions. But some things, he soon learns, are better left lost to history. Traveling to a remote cabin in Michigan in search of the doctor and his research, Stephen finds himself descending deeper into a world of terror and madness.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliant sequel.

  • By Natalie @ ABookLoversLife on 10-06-17

Short Book

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-14-18

This is Second book in series. While the first book Asylum can be read as a stand alone story this book is a direct continuation of the first book. The storyline is not as compelling as the first book’s and it ends unresolved. That means you have to get the Third Book in the series to find out what happens. It really feels like the 2nd and 3rd book were really just One book broken into 2 parts. When a book is 30 hours breaking it up into 2 separate books might be justified. This book is Just 5 hours and Book 3 is 6 hours. Since each book cost 10$ or 1 credit that’s pretty pricey especially when it seems like the entire series of three books could have been easily been released as one book or two at the most. The series is good but it artificially overpriced.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Occupant

  • The Afterlife Investigations, Book 3
  • By: Ambrose Ibsen
  • Narrated by: Joe Hempel
  • Length: 5 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 186
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 176
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 176

The door has been opened. It's already too late. The hunt is on for the thing that escaped from Chaythe Asylum. A life hangs in the balance. Dark plots set in motion more than thirty years ago wind to a close in this final, terrifying volume. Will Stephen Barlow intervene in time to spare the world the horrors of the Occupant?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fantastic finale

  • By Spooky Mike on 11-14-17

Good Series

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-14-18

This is the first set of books I’ve read (listened to) by the author. This may not be great Literature but it’s better than most of the books in this genre. I liked that the author spent some time after the books climax at the End wrapping up the series.
My only problem is the price. These are very short books 5-6 hours each. I actually like quick reads like this when it comes to horror stories. However spending 1 credit or 10$ for each book is a little pricey. For about 15 hours (3 books in series) you pay 30$.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Asylum

  • The Afterlife Investigations, Book 1
  • By: Ambrose Ibsen
  • Narrated by: Joe Hempel
  • Length: 6 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 440
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 412
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 411

College professor Stephen Barlow needs cash. Badly. He puts his skepticism aside and signs on to a paranormal research organization in the hopes of scoring a fat bonus. Enter Chaythe Asylum: a long-shuttered and controversial institution where patients were allegedly subjected to unethical experiments. Stephen deems the old building, closed in 1989 after a series of grisly murders, as good a place as any to explore the possibility of the supernatural, and arranges to take a tour with his students. But it turns out that the asylum is not as abandoned as it seems. There is something sinister in the building.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Haunting!

  • By Todd (Toad) Vogel on 08-18-17

An Old Fashion Ghost Story

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-13-18

Sort of slow but Book is not very long and I did not get bored listening to it in the background. Plain but well written. More implied horror that graphic blood and gore but a decent ghost? story

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Girl in the Moon

  • Angela Constantine, Book 1
  • By: Terry Goodkind
  • Narrated by: Elisabeth Rodgers
  • Length: 16 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 322
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 312
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 308

When Angela was young, before she came to realize she had a rare ability, she was a rather ordinary girl. At least, that was what everyone said. But Angela is anything but ordinary. The daughter of a meth addict, she is convinced she was born a freak. Haunted by an abusive childhood, she was forced to become a woman far too soon. And in the process, she became more.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Intense and heart-pounding!

  • By Michelle on 03-14-18

Some Good, Some Bad

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-13-18

Didn’t realize the author was The TG from Wizards First Rule (which I remember enjoying) just thought the story sounded interesting. Did not read NEST the earlier book in this series.
The Good - Potential. Very interesting mix of genres. A sort of spy novel with a psychic twist. Interesting main female lead with her coming of age story. I don’t mind the pedophilia or violence as much as some reviewers since it was used for purpose not as filler. Those things happens in the real world all the time so why get upset when it’s in a book. The main character is a female “Dexter” with psychic ability.
The Bad - The Author seemed to use very stereotypical characters. I wasn’t sure at first if the book was satire or just, well, bad.
The book characterizes everything in terms of good and bad. Muslim fanatics spout America the Great Satan every other line of dialogue. This group devotes their entire lives training for and enacting one mission. They are consummate professionals that manage to avoid detection from the entire world’s Intelligence services and build atomic weapons. They successfully enact a coordinated multiple attack plan in the US n Europe similar to 9-11. So at first they’re a super scary group of bad guys. Then when you meet them as individual characters as the book progresses that perception totally changes. They are the most incompetent dysfunctional elite terrorists you’ll ever meet. Religious fanaticism aside they all share the same fault. American women. If the see a pretty girl it’s screw the mission and it’s gang rape time. If all Elite terrorist groups are as incompetent as these guys - we’ll America can sleep easy. Unfortunately it’s not just the terrorist’s that seem to view women as exploitable sex dolls. The book is filled with Men that seem to be afflicted by the same uncontrollable desire to sexually exploit women every chance then can and every way they can. At first I was righteously upset at the first few men in the story, then I became aware those first guys were not aberrations. Apparently all men (with one or two exceptions) are misogynistic sexual predators in need of painful prolonged torture and death dealt out by our main character. Besides the men are all evil and deserve to die theme the author treats current social and political issues from sanctuary cities, drug abuse, governmental corruption and abuse of power just as heavy handed. It rough going for the reader who might not agree with all the authors very clear opinions on these issues. Regardless considering the interesting premise and main character I think it’s a shame that this book comes off so silly. I see that TG has sold over 25 million books so I guess he can write whatever the heck he wants.

  • Blackhorse Riders

  • A Desperate Last Stand, an Extraordinary Rescue Mission, and the Vietnam Battle America Forgot
  • By: Philip Keith
  • Narrated by: Dick Hill
  • Length: 10 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 51
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 45
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 45

This is the incredible true story of a brave military unit in Vietnam that risked everything to rescue an outnumbered troop under heavy fire-and the 39-year odyssey to recognize their bravery.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Battle Forgotten

  • By Pamela Dale Foster on 06-11-14

Black Horse Riders and Fire Base Illingham

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-04-18

Not bad. Liked both books since events closely connected. A little heavy on the Patriotism in the first book but given Americans lack of Patriotism about American War in Vietnam in the past revision is understandable. The author categorizes men who freeze up in combat as “mental misfits” which is bit much. His exposition on cowardice and bravery seems a bit old fashioned but our society loves “heroes”. What I have the most trouble with is the action in the book. C company - 80ish infantrymen walk into massive U shaped bunker complex manned by 600+, better armed, better supplied, dug in Enemy forces. They are completely surrounded for hours before they are rescued but only sustain 2 Kia’s. The enemy Colonel who tells his version says he knew the American company was coming and he purposefully lured them into a U shaped kill zone where they passed yards away from the Colonels bunker. The NVA, VC troops are touted supermen who rule the night, are masters of Jungle warfare, stealth, camouflage, and ambush according to the words of the American officers involved. The Enemy force has numerical superiority, terrain superiority, firepower superiority, tactical surprise and yet only 2 Americans are killed over hours of battle? Were the NVA troops just really really bad shots? I don’t get it. Still decent books - both.

  • Victory at Peleliu: The 81st Infantry Division's Pacific Campaign

  • By: John Peter DeCioccio, Bobby C. Blair
  • Narrated by: Grant D. Showalter
  • Length: 9 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 5
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3

When the 1st Marine Division began its invasion of Peleliu in September 1944, the operation in the South Pacific was to take but four days. In fact, capturing this small coral island in the Palaus with its strategic airstrip took two months and involved some of the bloodiest fighting of the Second World War in the Pacific.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • A Little Justice

  • By Farren Joy on 09-17-17

A Little Justice

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-17-17

I love the USMC but they brag way to much. Maybe their need to over inflate their accomplishments was rooted in a political necessity to avoid budget cuts or even total dissolution but historically it is misleading. The Marines did not win the Pacific theatre of war in WW2 alone. Unfortunately that's what the majority of books and movies portrays. It is about time inter service rivalry is put aside and a more balanced view showing the Army, Army Air Corps, and Navy helped the Marines - just a little. After that miscarriage of history is cleared up maybe we can start working on non US forces contributions to the Pacific war.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • On Combat

  • The Psychology and Physiology of Deadly Conflict in War and in Peace
  • By: Dave Grossman, Loren W. Christensen
  • Narrated by: Dave Grossman
  • Length: 18 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 1,521
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,400
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,393

On Combat looks at what happens to the human body under the stresses of deadly battle and the impact on the nervous system, heart, breathing, visual and auditory perception, memory - then discusses new research findings as to what measure warriors can take to prevent such debilitations so they can stay in the fight, survive, and win. A brief, but insightful look at history shows the evolution of combat, the development of the physical and psychological leverage that enables humans to kill other humans, followed by an objective examination of domestic violence in America.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A solid read. Very informative and rivreting.

  • By Daniel on 12-18-13

Slow going

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-09-17

Early review 2 hours in so in fairness take this in context.
First the author lists his best selling previous book, his multiple papers and speeches given to renowned organizations from Nobel Prize Medical Organizations and every organization involved with military or law enforcement. He does this for a long long time. I get it he thinks he is an expert. Then he talks about new words he had added to our vocabulary - for instance "killology". WTF? No way I'd be allowed to use that in scrabble. This guy has zero humility. Fair enough.
His Repeated premise "Our civilization could survive a generation without any occupation (medicine for instance) but we could not survive one generation without warriors". Really? I think he's missing the point. First off I'd say farmers are more important. No food and we would all be dead, warriors, doctors, clergy, everybody. Next if there were no warriors there would be no war. How would a generation without war be the end of civilization? By warrior he is referring to military, police, anyone who enters a combat. That warrior he presents as good could just as easily be bad depending our your viewpoint. So I think the world could well afford, actually greatly benefit from a generation without warriors of any kind.
The author also compares being a warrior today like the mythical chivalrous knights of Europe in medieval times. Bad analogy as chivalrous mythological ideals or not they used might to enforce their will. So are we regressing to might makes right.?
Way to many glorious quotes about our noble warriors. Warriors get paid just like everyone else. Heck they volunteer for the job today. Pay them more - no problem they deserve it but don't pretend aggression for hire (even if protecting) is noble.
He gives early example of armed police "running to the sound of the guns". Police rush out of elevator into lethal situation while EMTs try to "wisely" hide against back wall of elevator. He makes EMTs sound almost cowardly. First off the EMTs are going into lethal situation unarmed which is not their job. Why in the world would the police have allowed unarmed EMTs to go up an elevator into lethal situation in the first place. The EMTs were either brave or dumb depends on how you look at it. The police who allowed them to get in that situation weren't doing their job. The author again seems to have missed that point entirely. He glorifies the armed police running into danger - but that is their job, they choose that. They get paid for it.
The topic is very interesting but it's hard to follow logic of this kind. It's slow going packed with quotes, anecdotes, and flurries of random facts that are not given enough context to tell if they are meaningful or just used to promote the authors argument. As Joe Friday would say - "just the facts" and I would add facts given with critical context could have compressed this first 2 hours into 10 minutes

2 of 3 people found this review helpful