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Chelsea

  • 25
  • reviews
  • 18
  • helpful votes
  • 60
  • ratings
  • Significant Zero

  • Heroes, Villains, and the Fight for Art and Soul in Video Games
  • By: Walt Williams
  • Narrated by: Kevin T. Collins
  • Length: 9 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 75
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 72
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 72

When his satirical musings in a college newspaper got him discharged from the Air Force, it became clear to Walt Williams that his destiny in life was to be a writer - he just never thought he'd end up writing video games, let alone working on some of the most successful franchises in the industry - Bioshock, Civilization, Borderlands, and Mafia, among others. Williams pulls back the curtain on an astonishingly profitable industry that has put its stamp on pop culture and yet is little known to those outside its walls.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Revealing insight into the games industry

  • By Anonymous User on 10-06-17

it's a bad autobiography not what the title says

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-22-17

Terrible book. From the title I was expecting a thoughtful examination of art vs. function/commerce in the industry. It is actually a boring autobiography of a videogame writer who is utterly unlikeable. So much of it is self-indulgent, off-topic, tedious and unnecessary that I'm convinced even the author doesn't know what he set out to write. I feel ripped off by the misleading title and the fact that the writing is so mediocre and riddled with cliches and lacking in worthwhile insight... not to mention it is frequently (probably unintentionally?) condescending to the reader and moreso to game consumers in general.

I hung on until the end hoping for some semblance of value out of it but in the end it has been a waste of a credit and of my time. I could have given it an extra star if the title was at least reflective of the content but it is deceitful and inexcusable.

2 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Journal of the Gun Years

  • By: Richard Matheson
  • Narrated by: Stefan Rudnicki
  • Length: 7 hrs and 25 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 34
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 26
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 25

Back East, they told tall tales about Marshal Clay Halser, the fearless Civil War veteran who became known as the “Hero of the Plains” for his daring exploits in the Wild West. But the truth, as revealed in his private journals, is even more compelling.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A pleasant surprise

  • By Chelsea on 11-21-17

A pleasant surprise

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-21-17

Wasn't expecting too much but there is a bit of a lack of decent western novels devoted entirely to gunfighters and gunfights. this one intentionally cuts out most of the details that don't add to the construction of a gunfighter character and is a really enjoyable read. the narrator has some great moments and some moments where he is hard to take but on the whole I would enthusiastically recommend the book for straight up old west gunfighter story seekers.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Letterman

  • The Last Giant of Late Night
  • By: Jason Zinoman
  • Narrated by: Michael Goldstrom
  • Length: 9 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 293
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 263
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 260

In a career spanning more than 30 years, David Letterman redefined the modern talk show with an ironic comic style that transcended traditional television. While he remains one of the most famous stars in America, he is a remote, even reclusive figure whose career is widely misunderstood. In Letterman, Jason Zinoman, the first comedy critic in the history of the New York Times, mixes groundbreaking reporting with unprecedented access and probing critical analysis to explain the unique entertainer's titanic legacy.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Fails to Capture What Made Letterman Great

  • By Richard D. Ross on 04-21-17

Excellent.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-14-17

Great narration. Well researched. Insightful and occasionally poignant. Doesn't dwell unnecessarily on childhood like many biographies. Superb read overall.

  • Believe Me

  • A Memoir of Love, Death and Jazz Chickens
  • By: Eddie Izzard
  • Narrated by: Eddie Izzard
  • Length: 14 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,463
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1,382
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,376

Over the course of a 30-year career, Eddie Izzard has proven himself to be a creative chameleon, inhabiting the stage and film and television screens with an unbelievable fervor. Born in Yemen and raised in Ireland, Wales, and postwar England, he lost his mother at the age of six. In his teens he dropped out of university and took to the streets of London as part of a two-man escape act; when his partner went on vacation, Izzard kept busy by inventing a one-man act, and thus a career was ignited.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • My three least favorite words: "End of footnote."

  • By David H. Lawrence XVII on 06-20-17

slow start but excellent overall read

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-02-17

The childhood portion is a little slow but by the time he hits his stride the book is riveting and naturally he makes a superb narrator. And his ad libbed footnotes are an added bonus. highly recommended.

  • We Don't Need Roads

  • The Making of the Back to the Future Trilogy
  • By: Caseen Gaines
  • Narrated by: Ron Butler
  • Length: 8 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 292
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 268
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 271

Long before Marty McFly and Doc Brown traveled through time in a flying DeLorean, director Robert Zemeckis and his friend and writing partner Bob Gale worked tirelessly to break into the industry with a hit. For the first time ever, the story of how these two young filmmakers struck lightning is being told by those who witnessed it. We Don't Need Roads includes original interviews with Zemeckis, Gale, Christopher Lloyd, Lea Thompson, Huey Lewis, and over 50 others who contributed to one of the most popular and profitable film trilogies of all time.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Great for fans - good for others.

  • By Pete Johns on 06-25-15

Entertaining but little depth or insight.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-15-17

narrator was good. content was what you would expect from an author who basically amounts to a fan. Entertaining if you are also a fan but very limited in any kind of depth. Author says even less about the sequels than he does about the original, and is very easy and apologetic about the franchise's faults and imperfections.

  • No Country for Old Men

  • By: Cormac McCarthy
  • Narrated by: Tom Stechschulte
  • Length: 7 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,020
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,476
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,492

Cormac McCarthy, best-selling author of National Book Award winner All the Pretty Horses, delivers his first new novel in seven years. Written in muscular prose, No Country for Old Men is a powerful tale of the West that moves at a blistering pace.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Exceptional, engrossing, frightening.

  • By P. Giorgio on 07-27-13

Novels don't get any better than this...

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-27-17

...and neither do audiobooks.

That's all I want to say but the app forces you to write more.

  • Death by Video Game

  • Tales of Obsession from the Virtual Frontline
  • By: Simon Parkin
  • Narrated by: Toby Longworth
  • Length: 7 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 16
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 13
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 13

In Canada, volunteers are raising money for charity by playing marathon stints of Penn & Teller's Desert Bus, probably the worst video game ever created. Across the globe, thousands of viewers tune in to Kurt J. Mac's epic but seemingly pointless voyage towards the outer realms of Minecraft's procedurally-generated world. In Iraq, mothers encourage their children to enter Call of Duty competitions to keep them off the bomb-ravaged streets of Baghdad.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Not really about what the title suggests

  • By AmazonUser on 09-01-15

Excellent content and narration - annoying audio

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-25-17

some of the best analysis of video game player behaviour I've ever read. Excellent narration, but the first few hours the audio needed to be more compressed - some speech was too loud and other things too quiet to be heard clearly. Not much of a detriment though - definitely recommended.

  • The Internet of Things

  • The MIT Press Essential Knowledge Series
  • By: Samuel Greengard
  • Narrated by: Derek Shetterly
  • Length: 4 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 100
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 81
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 81

The Internet of Things is a networked world of connected devices, objects, and people. In this book Samuel Greengard offers a guided tour through this emerging world and how it will change the way we live and work. Greengard explains that the Internet of Things (IoT) is still in its early stages. Smartphones, cloud computing, RFID (radio-frequency identification), technology, sensors, and miniaturization are converging to make possible a new generation of embedded and immersive technology.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Was expecting more

  • By Chelsea on 10-14-16

Was expecting more

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-14-16

I was expecting more detail and more analysis of the IOT's implications for the future. This felt like a book report about a better book.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Masters of Doom

  • How Two Guys Created an Empire and Transformed Pop Culture
  • By: David Kushner
  • Narrated by: Wil Wheaton
  • Length: 12 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,130
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,912
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,896

Masters of Doom is the amazing true story of the Lennon and McCartney of video games: John Carmack and John Romero. Together, they ruled big business. They transformed popular culture. And they provoked a national controversy. More than anything, they lived a unique and rollicking American Dream, escaping the broken homes of their youth to produce the most notoriously successful game franchises in history - Doom and Quake - until the games they made tore them apart. This is a story of friendship and betrayal, commerce and artistry.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • How it was

  • By Ryan on 08-27-13

very interesting and entertaining untold history

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-19-16

excellent performance. interesting sliver of history that is only going to be more and more interesting as decades go by. very worthwhile read

  • Freemasons for Dummies, 2nd Edition

  • By: Christopher Hodapp
  • Narrated by: Tom Dheere
  • Length: 12 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 233
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 208
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 209

Take the mystery out of the Freemasons. Fascinated by Freemasons? Freemasons For Dummies is the internationally best-selling introduction to the Masons, the oldest and largest "secret society" in the world. This balanced, eye-opening guide demystifies Freemasonry, explaining everything from its elaborate rituals and cryptic rites, to its curious symbols and their meanings.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • This should be required for all new Freemasons!

  • By Tony Virelli on 05-17-16

Mostly useless

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-26-15

Any additional comments?

As with any book written about Freemasonry by a Freemason it is hindered by the oath of secrecy. This book contains the usual tone of masonic writing addressing wild accusations and misconceptions with mild dismissive humour but without providing any insight to make acknowledging them worthwhile. It teaches virtually nothing about masonry and focuses on making it appear unthreatening and mundane. There's nothing here for anyone who is already past the apprehension about it and simply wants a balanced insight.

2 of 4 people found this review helpful