LISTENER

Gayle

  • 4
  • reviews
  • 43
  • helpful votes
  • 13
  • ratings
  • The Man without a Face

  • The Unlikely Rise of Vladimir Putin
  • By: Masha Gessen
  • Narrated by: Justine Eyre
  • Length: 10 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 511
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 463
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 461

The Man Without a Face is the chilling account of how a low-level, small-minded KGB operative ascended to the Russian presidency and, in an astonishingly short time, destroyed years of progress, making his country once more a threat to her own people and to the world.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Interesting and entertaining

  • By Bob Jack on 05-08-12

Very interesting

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-06-13

Where does The Man without a Face rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

It is compelling nonfiction - a very interesting look at post Kruschev Soviet/Russian history and the rise of Putin - "the man without a face."

What other book might you compare The Man without a Face to and why?

Lenin's Tomb - by David Remnick - a story of post- Lenin Russia. A more comprehensive book than "Man with out a Face." And more compelling, but in the same ilk.

Which character – as performed by Justine Eyre – was your favorite?

She does adequate characterizations, but the book doesn't require more than adequate. Her voice is a little hoarse and grating at times, but the narration overall is fine.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

The book gives another aspect of post-Soviet Russia - and shows how the soviet legacy of power politics and the crushing of dissent have survived the "fall" of the iron curtain.

Any additional comments?

A very good read for anyone who wishes to see beyond the minimal press coverage of Russia since the 1990's. Also a stark warning to those who see Russia and Russian politics as a benign force to be ignored.

  • 23 Things They Don't Tell You about Capitalism

  • By: Ha-Joon Chang
  • Narrated by: Joe Barrett
  • Length: 8 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 973
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 783
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 777

If you've wondered how we did not see the economic collapse coming, Ha-Joon Chang knows the answer: We didn't ask what they didn't tell us about capitalism. This is a lighthearted book with a serious purpose: to question the assumptions behind the dogma and sheer hype that the dominant school of neoliberal economists-the apostles of the freemarket-have spun since the Age of Reagan.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Interesting but complicated

  • By Christopher Deaton on 05-03-16

If you love straw men you will love this book.

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-01-12

Would you try another book from Ha-Joon Chang and/or Joe Barrett?

This book is balderdash. Hacked up complaints about capitalism - create a straw man and bravely execute him. If you want to learn something, hear an important argument, find a great insight, I have only one bit of advice - look elsewhere!

Would you ever listen to anything by Ha-Joon Chang again?

No

Which character – as performed by Joe Barrett – was your favorite?

N/a

What character would you cut from 23 Things They Don't Tell You about Capitalism?

N/A

13 of 28 people found this review helpful

  • The Complete Infidel's Guide to the Koran

  • By: Robert Spencer
  • Narrated by: Lloyd James
  • Length: 8 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 406
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 336
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 335

The Koran: It may be the most controversial book in the world. Some see it as a paean to peace, others call it a violent mandate for worldwide Islamic supremacy. How can one book lead to such dramatically different conclusions?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Must Read

  • By David on 04-21-15

Indisputable facts

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-03-10

There are those who would shrink from the message in this book - that the Koran is not a religion of peace, that a major theme of Islam is to subjugate all those of a different religion. This book, mostly in tedious way, goes through the Koran in detail. It analyzes the many positions on the Koran, e.g. that sections of it (regarding killing infidels, for example) are read "out of context." It looks at the sections that are contradictory, or that are used to validate the claim that the Koran is just a book of wisdom. The Infide's Guide is somewhat dry and somewhat tedious, as it analyzes the positions and then cites the verses in the book that support or refute these claims.

No one can say that this book is a rant against Islam. That is what makes it so compelling. It is a scholarly, dry, and altogether horrifying look at what the Koran really says. You can't deny it, because the citations are there, and there are many.

This is a must-read for those who want to cut through the rhetoric and conflicting emotional appeals and learn the basic content of the Koran. While the author takes a clear editorial position, the only conclusion that this reader can make is that the editorial bent is driven by a criticial reading of the Koran.

The narration is adequate for the task.

30 of 44 people found this review helpful

  • The Help

  • By: Kathryn Stockett
  • Narrated by: Jenna Lamia, Bahni Turpin, Octavia Spencer, and others
  • Length: 18 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 36,223
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 22,232
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 22,253

In pitch-perfect voices, Kathryn Stockett creates three extraordinary women whose determination to start a movement of their own forever changes a town, and the way women - mothers, daughters, caregivers, friends - view one another. A deeply moving novel filled with poignancy, humor, and hope, The Help is a timeless and universal story about the lines we abide by, and the ones we don't.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • What a great surprise!

  • By Jan on 12-02-09

A "page turner"

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-03-10

I concur completely with the enthusiastic reviews of this book. It would be a great "read", but the dramatization really does improve the book, bringing out the personalities of the three main narrators. I would call this book "Dickensian" in the best sense of the word.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful