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Jugg

Menifee, CA, United States
  • 41
  • reviews
  • 16
  • helpful votes
  • 55
  • ratings
  • Bust Hell Wide Open

  • The Life of Nathan Bedford Forrest
  • By: Samuel W. Mitcham Jr.
  • Narrated by: Dan John Miller
  • Length: 10 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 82
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 73
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 73

The legacy of General Nathan Bedford Forrest is deeply divisive. Best known for being accused of war crimes at the Battle of Fort Pillow and for his role as first grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan - an organization he later denounced - Forrest has often been studied as a military figure, but never before studied as a fascinating individual who wrestled with the complex issues of his violent times. Bust Hell Wide Open is a comprehensive portrait of Nathan Bedford Forrest as a man: his achievements, failings, reflections, and regrets.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Outstanding

  • By B. Wood on 02-23-17

The Greatest Cavalry General?

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-30-18

An excellent and lively reconstruction of Forrest's life and accomplishments. Well researched, superbly written and exquisitely narrated. Mitcham draws a profile of one of The Civil War's greatest leaders and most charismatic personalities.

Highly recommended.

  • 4th Generation Warfare Handbook

  • By: William S. Lind, Gregory A. Thiele
  • Narrated by: Bob Allen
  • Length: 3 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 95
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 80
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 80

Written by the author of the Maneuver Warfare Handbook and an active-duty USMC officer with experience in Iraq, 4th Generation Warfare Handbook is the doctrine for a new generation of war. Over the last 40 years, the world has gradually entered into a post-Clausewitzian state where the wars are undeclared, the battlefields can be anywhere, the uniforms are optional, and the combatants as well as the targets are often "civilian."

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Strange Tides

  • By Mr. Conrad on 05-26-17

Excellent work...

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-28-18

While there were certainly concepts I disagree with. For example, Americans and the American culture will likely never accept a scenario in which combat casualties are skewed in favor of the enemy as a matter of strategy under any circumstances. A Commander in Chief or Commander who attempts to do so will not be in command long. That said,Lind’s ideas in later chapters are exceptional.

Highly recommend.

  • Confessions of a Cartel Hit Man

  • By: Martin Corona, Tony Rafael
  • Narrated by: Jacob Vargas
  • Length: 8 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 380
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 337
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 336

Martin Corona, a US citizen, fell into the outlaw life at 12 and worked for a crew run by the Arellano brothers, founders of the Tijuana drug cartel that dominated the Southern California drug trade and much bloody gang warfare for decades. Corona's crew would cross into the United States from their luxurious hideout in Mexico, kill whomever needed to be killed north of the border, and return home in the afternoon. Martin Corona played a key role in the downfall of the cartel when he turned state's evidence.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Rather Disappointing

  • By Betty Von Schnuuglestein on 08-03-17

Martin Corona is a killer...

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-27-18

A glimpse in how an American citizen, raised in a middle class neighborhood becomes a career criminal and cartel killer. A story that will hold your attention throughout.

Corona's frequent prison stints were simply networking opportunities.

  • A Spy's Guide to Strategy

  • By: John Braddock
  • Narrated by: Kevin Pierce
  • Length: 3 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 75
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 66
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 66

When you're a spy, you see a lot of strategies. It's your job to see grand strategies. Regional strategies. National strategies. Most of all, individual strategies. It's your job to see them and to understand them, because that's how you know when threats exist. To identify threats, you're infiltrating an enemy's organization. You're figuring out who is making decisions. And who isn't. You're collecting intelligence on what they know. And what they don't know. You're figuring out their plans.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent approach to strategy and game theory.

  • By Jeffrey Guy on 09-28-17

Look forward, Reason backward...

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-27-18

For a very short book, there is far too much repeat speak and redundancy - Look forward, Reason backward..., my boss, my boss's boss, my boss's boss's boss...et al.

Look forward, Reason backward is the hallmark statement of the book and is repeated over and over. Yet it is exactly what every competent planner does whether planning a wedding or an invasion.

The BEST piece of advice from the book is this (paraphrasing) - "Never engage in any game where the best outcome you can achieve is zero."

Braddock should've cut the liar loose after the second meeting and saved himself the pain.

I paid very little for this book. It was nearly worth the price.

  • Jack Hinson's One-Man War

  • By: Tom C. McKenney
  • Narrated by: David Colacci
  • Length: 14 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 283
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 257
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 257

A quiet, wealthy plantation owner, Jack Hinson watched the start of the Civil War with disinterest. Opposed to secession and a friend to Union and Confederate commanders alike, he did not want a war. After Union soldiers seized and murdered his sons, placing their decapitated heads on the gateposts of his estate, Hinson could remain indifferent no longer. He commissioned a special rifle for long-range accuracy, he took to the woods, and he set out for revenge.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Historically accurate Nonfiction as captivating as Author's prose

  • By DZ on 01-17-17

A little slow moving at times...Otherwise, a Good solid story

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-04-17

Good story, well researched with excellent narration.

If I have criticisms, they’re minor. First, In my view the story was a little slowing moving especially in the opening chapters. Second, there seemed to be considerable rehashing of information already covered nearly verbatim. This occurred throughout the book.

  • Kill Someone

  • By: Luke Smitherd
  • Narrated by: Matt Addis
  • Length: 8 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 266
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 249
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 249

From the author of the international best seller The Stone Man, short-listed for Audible UK's Book of the Year Award 2015. Here are the rules. Method: you can't use a gun. You can't use explosives. You can't use poison. It has to be up close and personal. You don't have to worry about leaving evidence; that will be taken care of. Victim: no one suicidal. No one over the age of 65. No one with a terminal illness. Choose your method. Choose your victim.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The Good of the Many is More Important...Or is it?

  • By JoanneG on 12-06-16

Slow, Weak and Oppressive...

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-30-17

We've all experienced a person who overthinks every single situation. This book is the literary version of that person.

Blackly humorous with no attempt to do so, this story leaves the reader ready to end the pain by closing the story almost from the beginning. The main character, Chris Summers, lacks any shred of masculinity and is nearly impossible to identify with. In his own words, "A middle class pussy." He comes across as a whiny bitch throughout the story.

I managed to get through the book as I was on a long drive and this was the only book I had loaded. Lesson learned.

The single upshot - the narration is outstanding.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Directives

  • Holding Their Own, Book 8
  • By: Joe Nobody
  • Narrated by: Dave Wright
  • Length: 11 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 134
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 123
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 121

A leaderless, exhausted federal government is pulling out of Texas, leaving nine million survivors of the apocalypse to fend for themselves. In an attempt to fill the void, the Alliance of West Texas prepares to step in. The ruling council establishes five directives; Energy, Agriculture, Transportation, Communications and Security.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Good story - so-so reader

  • By Vicky Rowe on 03-07-16

Good Story

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-09-17

Highly enjoyable story. Good narration, though the voice is so strong he has a difficult time with feminine characterizations. The random sound effects in these later books is distracting and unnecessary. Also, it seems every book has a different narrator. some are quite good. Others would be better suited to a career as a mime.

Bishop better check six, Terri is becoming the real power center.

All said, read and enjoy. It's thrilling and laced with highs and lows that will keep you looking for a quiet spot to listen. I suggest a long, solo drive.

  • Holding Their Own II

  • The Independents
  • By: Joe Nobody
  • Narrated by: Frank Collison
  • Length: 8 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 203
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 184
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 185

The second in the series, Holding Their Own II: The Independents, continues the saga of a young couple trying to survive in the post-apocalyptic American West. Unable to maintain rule of law, the federal government now faces an opposition movement and the threat of civil war. Bishop and Terri are drawn into the struggle and have to risk everything to save both an old friend and the country they love.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Much improvement

  • By Julie on 12-30-13

Good Story

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-16-17

If you're looking for survival tips, this book won't help. Other than that, it's a very good story. Narration is much, much better as well. Lots of action. Bishop's slightly sarcastic, tongue in cheek humor keeps a smile on your face, too. My only reluctance for a 5 score is that Bishop becomes a bit of a Hollywood ninja in this and later books. A name that strikes fear in the hearts of grown men and gives children nightmares.

Regardless, a worthwhile read. Highly recommend.

  • The Perfect Kill

  • 21 Laws for Assassins
  • By: Robert B. Baer
  • Narrated by: Keith Szarabajka
  • Length: 10 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 317
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 285
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 283

Assassination has been dramatized by literature and politicized by infamous murders throughout history, and for Robert Baer, one of the most accomplished agents to ever work for the CIA, it's a source of endless fascination, speculation, and intrigue. Over several decades, Baer served as an operative, from Iraq to New Delhi and beyond; notably, his career was the model for the acclaimed movie Syriana.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Kill the King, Don't Slap Him

  • By Mike on 01-06-15

Meh...

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-25-17

My second Baer book. The prose was much better than the first as was the narration (Baer elected not to narrate this one). The story focuses on the author's CIA days in Lebanon and both his fear and idolization of a Shiite Lebanese political assassin and terrorist. Thus, the title should read 21 laws for POLITICAL assassins. There is a difference.

The author leads us on a fanciful, yet undetermined and unsuccessful effort to track down his nemesis. In doing so, he lays out what he believes are the essential rules for a good political killer. He regularly attempts to use little vignettes to make his point. More often than not however, the stories simply left me trying to decipher the intended relationship.

At the end of both books, I must empathize with Baer. He calls himself a foot soldier. But, in reality is little more than a puffy little bureaucrat left to dangle at the end of an even larger bureaucracy in Washington and Langley. Though he does his best to glamorize it, it must have been an unfulfilling career.

  • Enemies Foreign and Domestic

  • By: Matthew Bracken
  • Narrated by: Mike Kemp
  • Length: 26 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 457
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars 434
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 431

The story begins on opening day of the NFL season, when bullets begin to rain down upon the upper deck of a packed football stadium. A panic stampede ensues, leading to mass casualties. The alleged sniper is found holding a smoking assault rifle, and is killed by a police marksman. One week later, Congress bans the private possession of all semi-automatic assault rifles. Gun owners are given one week to turn in their semi-automatic rifles, or face a five year mandatory sentence.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Great story if you can get past the performance

  • By B. Lambert on 07-09-13

Great Story

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-28-17

Bracken weaves a terrifying story of government corruption and over reach. It gives credibility to the quote "Never let a serious crisis go to waste." And adds "If no good crisis exists, create one." A+++